Question formation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Question formation

on

  • 482 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
482
Views on SlideShare
482
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
18
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Question formation Question formation Presentation Transcript

    • Forming Questions E. Siler
    • 2 Types of Questions • Yes/No • Wh (Information)
    • Points to Understand • Questions are formed from clauses. • In most cases, English questions require a verb phrase that has at least two verbs in it. • English yes/no questions form the foundation of many WH-questions. • Thus it is important to start by learning to make yes/no questions.
    • Yes/No Questions • The basic rule is very simple: A. Evaluate the main verb phrase of the clause you are going to turn into a question. B. Determine how many verbs are in the verb phrase. C. Move the first verb to the left of the subject.
    • Simple Practice • That newscaster is explaining the news. A lot of interesting things have been happening lately! There have been a lot of unusual weather events.
    • Find the Verb Phrases • That newscaster is explaining the news. A lot of interesting things have been happening lately! There have been a lot of unusual weather events.
    • Count the Verbs • That newscaster is explaining (2) the news. A lot of interesting things have been happening (3) lately! There have been(2) a lot of unusual weather events.
    • Move the Verbs • That newscaster is explaining the news. A lot of interesting things have been happening lately! There have been a lot of unusual weather events. • Is that newscaster explaining the news? • Have a lot of interesting things been happening lately? • Have there been a lot of unusual weather events?
    • Harder Yes/No Questions • Not all verb phrases have two or more verbs in them. • Some have only one verb in the verb phrase: those that form the simple present or the simple past tense. • In that case, you have to CREATE a second verb using the auxiliary form of the verb “do.”
    • Creating a Second Verb • Start with a clause with a single-verb verb phrase. • • Determine the tense and the number of the verb (if it is in the present tense). • • That dog does likes bones. Turn the main verb (the one on the right) into the simple form. • • That dog likes (1) bones. (present/3rd person singular). Add a form of “do” that is the same tense and number in front of the verb. • • That dog likes (1) bones. That dog does like bones. Move the first verb in front of the subject. • Does that dog like bones?
    • More Practice Remember to consider tense! The dog chewed the bone (1 verb, past tense). The dog did chew the bone. Did the dog chew the bone?
    • Exception to this Rule • Sometimes the verb phrase is a single verb that is a form of “be.” • That is a Golden Retriever. • In this case, you don’t have to make a second verb. • Just put the verb in front of the subject. • Is that a Golden Retriever?
    • Yes/No Questions and Subordination • One problem students have is with the sentences that have multiple clauses. • He knew that his dog was having puppies. • When we make yes/no questions, we use the verb phrase of the main clause in the sentence (the biggest clause). • The others do not change. • Did he know that his dog was having puppies?
    • More on Subordination Sometimes an adverbial clause comes before the subject. You may have to move it to make a good yes/no question. Whenever he slept, he snored. Did he snore whenever he slept?
    • Yes/No Questions and Coordination Yes/No Questions can be hard to form when a sentence is coordinated. • The dog drank the water and chewed the bone. • The dog drank the water and the cat chewed the bone. • The dog drank the water and was making weird noises.
    • Case #1 The dog drank the water and chewed the bone. •When the subject of the coordinated verbs (drank/chewed) is the same (the dog), make one question but turn both verbs into simple form. •Did the dog drink the water and chew the bone?
    • Case #2 The dog drank the water and the cat chewed the bone. •When the coordinated clauses involve different subjects, make two different questions. •Did the dog drink the water? Did the cat chew the bone?
    • Case #3 The dog drank the water and was making weird noises. • In this case the coordinated verb phrases are different. One has one verb; the other has two. Make two different questions. • Did the dog drink the water? Was the dog making weird noises?
    • Making WH Questions • Find the part of the original sentence that you want to question. • If the part you want to question is the subject of the verb phrase in the original sentence, do NOT make a yes-no question. • Remove the subject. It will become the answer to your question.
    • Example • The flashmobcaused a huge traffic jam. > • What caused a huge traffic jam? The flashmob. • The rock star came onto the stage. > • Who came onto the stage? The rock star. • Pullman Washington is her hometown. > • Where is her hometown? Pullman, WA.
    • The Two Step WH-Question • However, if you want to question some other part of the original clause, you must first make the proper yes-no question (slides 1-18) and THEN select the proper WH-Word. Remove the part you are questioning from the sentence!
    • Examples • The flashmob caused a huge traffic jam. > • Did the flashmob cause a huge traffic jam? > • What did the flashmob cause? A huge traffic jam. • He went to the gym.> • Did he go to the gym? > • Where did he go? To the gym.