Open Access and Its Impact on the Library and Information Science Field
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Open Access and Its Impact on the Library and Information Science Field

on

  • 357 views

This presentation was completed as a complement to the research paper "OA in LIS: What Library and Information Science Students Need to Know About Open Access." This research paper was completed for ...

This presentation was completed as a complement to the research paper "OA in LIS: What Library and Information Science Students Need to Know About Open Access." This research paper was completed for the course LSC-557: “Libraries and Information in Society,” which I am taking towards a Master's degree in Library and Information Science at the Catholic University of America.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
357
Views on SlideShare
253
Embed Views
104

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

2 Embeds 104

http://elizabethlieutenant.com 97
http://elizabethlieutenant.wordpress.com 7

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Open Access and Its Impact on the Library and Information Science Field Open Access and Its Impact on the Library and Information Science Field Presentation Transcript

    • Open Access & Its Impact on the Library and Information Science Field Elizabeth Lieutenant The Catholic University of America LSC-557: Final Project Presentation November 29, 2013
    • What is Open Access? The ALA defines open access as: 1. Pertaining to scholarly material that is made available online without charge to the user. 2. There are two basic open access models: open access archiving (the deposit of a traditionally published journal article in a preprint or postprint server) and open access publishing (publication in an open access journal). Levine-Clark, M., & Carter, T. M. (Eds.) (2013). ALA glossary of library & information science (4th ed.). Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
    • Many Definitions of Open Access Three leading open access statements: 1. The Budapest Open Access Initiative, 2. The Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing, 3. The Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. Goal: “Free Online Access to Journal Articles” Crawford, W. (2011). Open access: What you need to know now. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
    • Open Access Colors & Flavors 1. “ ” OA: Journal publishers provide full-text online access to users immediately upon publication. 2. “Conditional” OA: Journal publishers provide full-text online access to users after an embargo period. 3. “ ” OA: Self-archiving scholarly materials and/or depositing materials within OA repositories. 4. “Gratis” OA: Literature that is available for free online. 5. “Libre” OA: Free online literature that is also free of excessive copyright and licensing restrictions. Crawford, W. (2011). Open access: What you need to know now. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
    • Open Access Materials in Libraries In a survey conducted by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in 2007: • 99% of libraries provide links to OA resources. • 74% of libraries self-host OA resources. Hood, A. K. (2007). Open access resources. Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries.
    • LIS Journal Subscription Costs LIS Journal Subscription Costs in US Dollars 286 2002 319 2003 360 2004 403 424 2005 2006 453 2007 487 2008 Greco, A. M. (Ed.) (2009). The state of scholarly publishing: Challenges and opportunities. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.
    • Citation Impact Scores of LIS Journals 85 journals selected Not OA (50) Full OA (27) Conditional OA (8) 9% 32% 59% 5 of the Top 20 ranked journals were full OA Xia, J. (2012). Positioning open access journals in a LIS journal ranking [Electronic version]. College & Research Libraries, 73(2), 134-145. Retrieved from http://crl.acrl.org/content/73/2/134.full.pdf+html.
    • Why should you support OA? • • • • • Increased access to scholarly materials. Support diffusion of knowledge. Positive reinforcement. Support retention of author copyright. Help contain costs.
    • What can your institution do? • Support publishing in OA journals by paying author-side fees. • Mandate self-archiving for faculty. • Create an institutional repository for faculty and students to self-archive their publications. • Create a knowledge repository for faculty to archive their lesson plans and lectures.
    • What can you do? • • • • • • • • Educate yourself on OA. Educate others on OA. Lobby your institution to support OA practices. Include OA sources in your collections. Cite OA sources in your work. Publish your work in OA journals. Self-archive your work in OA repositories. Volunteer to support OA journals.
    • Most importantly Practice what you preach: “Librarians and LIS scholars need to take a leadership role and set an example for other fields by archiving all articles they publish… It would be at that point that the availability of LIS literature would match the rhetoric of many of its practitioners, and the field could point to its own literature as a shining example of free and open access” (p. 308). Way, D. (2010). The open access availability of library and information science literature [Electronic version]. College & Research Libraries, 71(4), 302-309. Retrieved from http://crl.acrl.org/content/71/4/302.full.pdf+html.
    • References Association of College and University Libraries. (n.d.) Standards for Distance Learning Library Services. (n.d.). Retrieved October 22, 2013, from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/guidelinesdistancelearning. Bailey, Jr., C. W. (2006). What is open access? In Jacobs, N. (Ed.), Open access: Key strategic, technical and economic aspects (13-26). Oxford, England: Chandos Publishing. Crawford, W. (2011). Open access: What you need to know now. Chicago, IL: American Library Association. Greco, A. M. (Ed.) (2009). The state of scholarly publishing: Challenges and opportunities. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Hood, A. K. (2007). Open access resources. Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries. Islam, M. S., Kunifuji, S., Hayama, T., & Miura, M. (2011). E-learning in LIS education: An analysis and prediction [Electronic version]. Library Review, 60(7), 544-559. doi:10.1108/00242531111153579. Levine-Clark, M., & Carter, T. M. (Eds.) (2013). ALA glossary of library & information science (4th ed.). Chicago, IL: American Library Association. Rabina, D. (2013). Reference materials in LIS instruction: A delphi study [Electronic version]. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 54(2), 108-123. Retrieved from http://proxycu.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.proxycu.wrlc.org/docview/1399142267?accountid=9940. Rubin, R. E. (2010). Foundations of library and information science (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc. Sawant, S. (2013). Open access resources useful in LIS education [Electronic version]. Library Hi Tech News, 30(7), 16-20. doi:10.1108/LHTN-05-2013-0029. Way, D. (2010). The open access availability of library and information science literature [Electronic version]. College & Research Libraries, 71(4), 302-309. Retrieved from http://crl.acrl.org/content/71/4/302.full.pdf+html. Willinsky, J. (2006). The access principle: The case for open access to research and scholarship. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Xia, J. (2012). Positioning open access journals in a LIS journal ranking [Electronic version]. College & Research Libraries, 73(2), 134-145. Retrieved from http://crl.acrl.org/content/73/2/134.full.pdf+html. Xia, J., Wilhoite, S. K., & Myers, R. L. (2011). A “librarian-LIS faculty” divide in open access practice [Electronic version]. Journal of Documentation, 67(5), 791-805. doi:10.1108/00220411111164673. Author’s Note: Sources in RED are not available in Open Access format.
    • Questions, Comments, Concerns? • Feeling overwhelmed like Penny the Cat? Don’t be! • OA may seem confusing, but it can be understood with a little bit of time & knowledge. • I’ll do my best to help answer any of your questions. Thank you!