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Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
Unit 8 project identifying  crime patterns e hall
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Unit 8 project identifying crime patterns e hall

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  • 1. Running Header: Crime Patterns<br />Identifying Crime Patterns<br />Elizabeth Hall<br />Kaplan University<br />Introduction to Crime Analysis CJ110-03<br />Tracy Walker Townsend<br />1.12.2011<br />-409575-114300 COEUR D’ALENE POLICE<br /> Crime Analyst Unit<br /> Part I Crimes Comparison to Previous Year Data<br /> Overall Increase in Part I Crimes <br /> Decrease in Forcible Rape<br /> No Change in Motor Vehicle Theft <br />Crime# Reported in 2003# Reported in 2004Decimal to be ConvertedPercentage of ChangeHomicide15210.440.00%Forcible Rape2319-0.17391304-17.39%Robberies55790.4363636443.64%Aggravated Assaults851150.3529411835.29%Burglaries1251380.10410.40%Motor Vehicle Theft10310300.00%Larceny35380.085714298.57%<br />Work Product of Elizabeth Hall Coeur D’Alene Crime Analysis Unit 1.12.2011<br />Identifying Crime Patterns Essay Questions<br />1. In a short paragraph, explain what you believe the crime trend is for this jurisdiction.<br />I believe that the data for the Coeur D’Alene Police Department jurisdiction depicts an overall increase in Part I Crimes. These crimes are showing a considerable increase in all violent offenses excluding those of a sexual nature (forcible rape). By the nature of the crimes that have increased considerably (robberies, aggravated assaults, and homicides), one might infer that there is increasing gang activity in the area. (Siegel, 2010)<br />2. What information don’t we have that might explain some of the increases?<br />The first piece of information that is missing that might explain some of the increases in Part I Crimes in Coeur D’Alene jurisdiction is the number of population. If there was a large growth in the population of the city, the number of crimes reported might increase, but the per person comparison of the crime rate may stay the same. Another piece of beneficial information to interpret the increases in these crimes would be a map indicating location of incidents. The last piece of information that I feel is missing is the demographical data concerning the locations of the incidents because this data would contain information on unemployment rates, economical fluctuations, and the ethnic makeup of the areas affected by the increase, as all of these factors can explain the increases in jurisdictional crime rates. (Wilson, 2009)<br />3. What crime(s) is (are) staying the same?<br />The only crime that stayed the same in the data that we were provided is Motor Vehicle Theft. Every other crime listed either increased or decreased.<br />4. What crimes should be analyzed a little closer in the hopes of finding a trend? What would you try to identify? Would this be a tactical, administrative, or strategic analysis?<br />I believe that the crimes listed that should be analyzed a little closer in the hopes of finding a trend would be the crimes with the largest percentage of increase. In this case, this would be robberies, with a 43.64 percent increase, homicide with a 40.00 percent increase, and aggravated assaults with a 35.29 percent increase. The first item to identify, is the geospatial location of the incidents, so I could map them. Once this is done, I can locate the incident reports by the address and chart any details given in the individual reports to look for similarities in times, days of the week, modus operandi, offender descriptions, and other details that will help me identify any trends. (Bruce, Hick, & Cooper, 2004)<br />This particular analysis would be classified as strategic, because it is focused on patterns, trends, and causes of crime than in a particular crime or offender or their apprehension. Tactical analysis refers to the daily routine operations that an analyst performs to identify crime series and hot spots in the jurisdiction. This may be focused on aiding the apprehension of a particular offender or group of offenders. Administrative analysis involves any kind of crime analysis reporting to administration in your agency to any other analysis not involving the direct apprehension of criminals. This could be research, statistical reports used in explanation of funding needs for an agency, or demographic charting for the jurisdiction. (Bruce et al, 2004)<br />5. Are the crimes above Part I or Part II crimes? Explain the difference between the two types.<br />According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (2004), there are two types of offenses. The first is called Part I crimes, which are considered serious crimes. The list of these offenses is as follows, criminal homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and larceny with the exception of motor vehicle theft. These crimes happen on a regular basis, and incident data is collected for the Uniform Crime Report (UCR) monthly. (Federal Bureau of Investigation 2004)<br /> The second is called Part II crimes, and are comprised of less serious criminal activity. The only data collected on these crimes is arrest data. The crimes listed in the UCR as Part II offenses are, simple assaults, forgery, counterfeiting, fraud, embezzlement, buying, receiving, or possessing of stolen property, vandalism, weapons carrying or possession, prostitution, sex offenses, drug abuse violations, and other minor offenses. Vagrancy, public drunkenness, and disorderly conduct are even more Part II offenses. (Federal Bureau of Investigation 2004)<br />References<br />Bruce, C.W., Hick, S.R., & Cooper, J.P. (2004). Exploring Crime Analysis Reading on EssentialSkills. International Association of Crime Analysts. Overland Park, KS.<br />Federal Bureau of Investigation, (2004). Crime in the United States 2004. Appendix II- Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting. Retrieved From: http://www2.fbi.gov/ucr/cius_04/appendices/appendix_02.html<br />Siegel, L.J. (2010). Criminology: Theories, Patterns, and Typologies. Tenth Edition. Belmont: <br /> Wadsworth Cengage Learning.<br />Wilson, J.Q. (2009). Crime and Economy Don’t Tell the Whole Story. Los Angeles Times.Retrieved from: http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/editorials/la-oe-wilson8-2009jan08,0,7541431.story<br />**Police logo was found at: http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&expIds=25657,27955,28009,28203&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=police+logo+pics&cp=15&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&ei=wfMtTYqxKo2aOqjFlbkK&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQsAQwAA&biw=1366&bih=575<br />

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