Anticipatory it  b2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Anticipatory it b2

on

  • 480 views

Grammar- it anticipatory and other uses of "it"

Grammar- it anticipatory and other uses of "it"

Statistics

Views

Total Views
480
Views on SlideShare
303
Embed Views
177

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

3 Embeds 177

http://cursodeingles-elena.blogspot.com.es 122
http://www.cursodeingles-elena.blogspot.com.es 52
http://cursodeingles-elena.blogspot.com 3

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Anticipatory it  b2 Anticipatory it b2 Presentation Transcript

  •  ADVANCED B2 GRAMMAR Why Steve Jobs was a genius is clear. It is clear why Steve Jobs was a genius. Anticipatory it
  • If the subject is a long or grammatically complex structure (a that-clause, wh-clause, toinfinitive or if-clause), we prefer to use a pattern with it. This allows us to put those clauses at the end of the sentence, which is the usual place in English for information that is important or new.  Example:  Why  Steve decided to resign Better: It is clear resign. is clear. why Steve decided to
  •  It + is + clear + why Steve decided to resign.  It + is + my ambition + to set up my own business.  Original sentence:To set up my own business is my ambition:  It + is + an honour + that Professor Jobs is attending the conference this evening.
  •  Examples:  It + helps + the cook + to have a sharp knife.  It + upsets + me + to hear people arguing.  It + worried + her parents + that she drove so fast.
  •  Verbs in this group include amaze, annoy, astonish, bother, concern, frighten, hurt, please, scare, shock, surprise, upset and worry.  They also have an alternative pattern, e.g. Her parents were worried that she drove so fast.  Verbs with NO alternative pattern include appear, come about, emerge, follow, happen, seem, transpire, e.g. It turned out that the bike didn’t belong to him.
  •  This structure is common with many adjectives expressing possibility, necessity, importance, etc. Some of them are un/important, essential, necessary, normal, common, un/usual, right, wrong, pointless, vital, etc.
  •  It + is + vital + for + her + to be resilient in her job.  It + is + important + for + the meeting + to start at 8.00.
  • C) IT + VERB + ADJECTIVE/NOUN PHRASE + FOR + OBJECT + TO INFINITIVE  mistake, idea, plan, shame and pity.  It + was + a good idea + for them + to travel in separate cars.
  • C) IT + VERB + ADJECTIVE/NOUN PHRASE + FOR + OBJECT + TO INFINITIVE  un/important, essential, necessary, normal, common, un/usual, right, wrong, pointless, vital, etc.
  •  It refers to a clause that comes later in the sentence.  SUBJECT + VERB+ IT + THAT – CLAUSE/ WHCLAUSE/ IF- CLAUSE  SUBJECT + VERB + IT + NOUN PHRASE/ ADJECTIVE + THAT – CLAUSE/ WH- CLAUSE/ INFINITIVE
  • I + hate + it + that you can swim so well and I can’t.  I + wouldn’t mind + it + if she helped in the house when she stayed with us.  We + like + it + when you cook for us.
  •  have to do with (not) liking, e.g. bear, enjoy, hate, like, love, don’t mind, can’t stand, prefer, resent, understand, etc.
  •  We + found + it + strange + that she hadn’t written.  I + consider + it + a waste of money + to throw food away.  Verbs used with this structure indicate how we see a particular event or situation, e.g. believe, consider, find, feel, think, etc.
  •  Verbs used with this structure indicate how we see a particular event or situation, e.g. believe, consider, find, feel, think, etc.
  •  To drive a car without a licence is illegal.   That she wasn’t hurt in the fall was a miracle.   To sing in a choir is very enjoyable.   If the two countries don’t reach an agreement soon will be surprising.   Where the light was coming from was far from clear.   That the two sides work towards peace is the Foreign Minister’s hope.
  •  That you already know my secret is obvious.   To send his children to study abroad is his intention.   When Max eventually turned up was a relief.   To know basic computer skills is essential nowadays.   That they could get lost on the way back really worries me.   That he has a good rapport with his students is very important for Pete.
  •  Join the sentences using introductory it as an object. You might need to make some changes.  She would like to make a living from her painting. She finds this impossible.  She dances very well. I love this. She moves so gracefully.  Students make the same mistake again and again. I can’t stand this.  People don’t pick up their dog’s mess. I hate this.
  • 1. USES OF IT: IT PRONOUN, DUMMY/PREP IT, ANTICIPATORY IT.  http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internetgrammar/minor/antit.htm 2. IT EXTRAPOSITION ( extra practice)  http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/sentcleft.html#whatcleft weighing content).
  •  http://www.odlt.org/ballast/anticipatory_it. html  Also remember to revise Cleft sentences @:  http://cursodeingleselena.blogspot.com.es/2013/10/b2advanced-2-grammar-unit-1b-cleft.html
  • Adapted from “anticipatory it” notes by Jackie Knowles. Power Point by Elena Gómez.