Absinthe<br />Absinthe is an alcoholic aperitif <br />Made from alcohol and distilled herbs amongst them grand wormwood (A...
WORMWOOD<br />aka Grand Wormwood aka Artemisia Absinthium- <br />Silvery green perennial herb similar to sage, whose white...
Wormwood <br />Consumed by:<br />either grounded up the leaves and combing it with other herbs and some sort of sweet beer...
The Creation of Absinthe<br />Pierre Ordinaire- French expatriate living in Switzerland, working as a country doctor was s...
The History and Mystery <br />of the Green Fairy<br />
Pernod<br />1805 Secret formula landed in the hands of Major Dubied<br />His sons resurrected a distillery in Pontarlier, ...
Absinthe Goes to War<br />1844-1847- The French Army was fighting in Algeria<br />Drops of Absinthe were prescribed to be ...
Paris Bohemia<br />The industrial age resulted in a large population growth, especially between the ages of 15 to 30. <br ...
The Artist, Writers who lived and died by Her<br />Charles BaudelairePoet<br />Arthur Rimbaud<br />poet<br />Paul Verlaine...
The Artist, Writers who lived and died by Her<br />Alfred Jarry<br />Drank Absinthe undiluted<br />Eccentric playwright-<b...
EdouardManetThe Absinthe Drinker<br />
Edgar Degas“L’Absinthe” <br />
Moulin Rouge<br />
Moulin Rouge<br />
Absinthe-International Celebrity<br /><ul><li>End of the 19Century Absinthe is booming
Beginning to surpassing the sale of wine and beer in France
Pernod Factory burns down- minor set back
1908 Multiple distilleries are built and are shipping Absinthe globally
The most famous and the ones that survived to this day are Pernod and Kubler distillery of Switzerland. </li></li></ul><li...
Absinthe Comes to New Orleans<br />Consumed by all from Artist, musicians to new Orleans madams<br />At the heart of it wa...
Nouvelle-Orleans Superieure<br />Each batch of Nouvelle-Orleans is handcrafted by T.A. Breaux <br />The same authentic ing...
Nouvelle-Orleans Superieure<br />Appearance: Clear, bright, light green to it which is an indicator of the use of fresh wo...
Sazerac<br />Recipe<br />1/2 teaspoon absinthe1 sugar cube4 dashes Peychauds bitters2 ounces Sazerac Rye whiskeyStrip of l...
Antoine Amadie Peychaud, a Creole apothecary was serving it late night to his friends<br />The original formula was made w...
   Picasso<br />The Absinthe Drinker<br />The woman drinking Absinthe<br />The Glass of Absinthe<br />
Kubler Superieure<br />Created in 1863 it was launched by J. Fritz Kübler in Motiers,Switzerland. Considered by some to be...
Kubler History<br />1863 J.F. Kübler, started the Kübler Absinthe tradition<br />It continued until the Swiss absinthe pro...
Death in the Afternoon<br />Recipe:1 shot absintheFill to the top with Champagne<br />Directions: Pour absinthe into a cha...
The Beginning of the End<br />1900’s Absinthe was starting to have wearing effects on the public<br />Knock off brands usi...
Lautrec – Van Gogh drinking Absinthe<br />
Vincent Van Gogh<br />One of the most famous and controversial Absinthe drinkers<br />Consumed along with many other famou...
Victor Oliva: The Absinthe Drinker<br />
Beginning of the End<br />Temperance movement begins their battle against Absinthe<br />1907 “ Absinthe makes you crazy an...
Pacifique Verte Superieure<br />Pacific Distillery is a family-owned and operated micro-distillery in Woodinville, Washing...
Pacifique Verte Superieure<br />Color: light green color<br />Nose: Intense nose with warm spiciness blended with crisp al...
Temperance Movement<br />Green Fairy became the scape goat for ill’s of society<br />Alcoholic became known as having Absi...
2003: Suggestion of  mind altering substance<br />
Cry Murder<br />Two Heinous murders sealed Absinthe’s Fate.<br />August 1905 a farmer,  killed his pregnant wife, their tw...
The Death of Absinthe<br />Outrage people of the region petitioned for Absinthe Ban<br />Producers banned together to try ...
Scattering and Survival <br />Pernod-  reformulated their product post Prohibition. <br />Wormwood component was removed<b...
Fake Vs. Real Absinthe<br />Real absinthe should be no less than 50% alc<br />It should be sweetened  <br />It should not ...
Absinthe Label Checklist<br />Minimum of 50% alc<br />No added sugar <br />Look for the term distilled<br />The base alc o...
Lucid<br />2007- The first genuine absinthe to available in the US in over 95 years<br />Created by T. A. Breaux who condu...
The Absinthe Drip<br />1. 5 oz Lucid<br />1 sugar cube<br />4.5 to 6 oz of ice cold water<br />Directions: <br />pour the ...
Louche<br />Cold water allows the essential oils to precipitate of their suspension. <br />It releases the aromas and flav...
Green Tint<br />Is the effect of the maceration and distillation of various herbs.<br />Which results  in the chlorophyll ...
Thujone: Madness or Myth<br />Thujone a natural constituent of wormwood, and regarded as its 'active' ingredient. <br />Th...
Thujone: Madness or Myth<br />Papers published in the 1980's and 1990's postulated thujone concentrations as high as 260 m...
Thujone Conclusion<br />You would have to drink over 7 liters of Absinthe in order to feel the harmful effects of  Thujone...
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The green fairy

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The rise and fall of Anbsinthe and it's return to the US market

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  • Wormwood was quite bitter so the wine was used to soften the taste.
  • Walla a digestive was created and so was absinthe
  • Pernod began distilling absinthe but for the most part it was only consumed by the locales.cities swell, the poor are working harder then ever. Absinthe a spirit said to contain curative powers and also affordable was a logical choice for the poor
  • The painting: L’ Eclipse published a scathing cartoon by Andre Gill in its June 1974 edition showing a soldier drinking a large glass of AbsintheFrench officers and service men brought their favorite drink to Algerias café and nightclubs, where it quickly became fashionable.
  • Absinthes famous imbibers are as varied and intriguing as the drink itself. Fueled by its uniquely stimulating qualities, some of the more notorious wrote, painted and professed with eh green fairy at their side. So popular was the pastime of drinking absinthe that the traditional cocktail hour in Paris became known at the L’hueure Verte “the green hour” . And the cafes provided a backdrop for the exchange of information and ideas.
  • Contemporary Painter- painted what he saw in real life. This painting of a seedy, unkempt man standing beside his glass of absinthe, with the spend bottle at his feet, happened to be a stark portrayal of a local drunkard named Collardet. This painting was rejected by the art show Salon of Paris because the French were not prepared to show the truthful image of the city’s under belly
  • Like Manet he used actual subjects. This is a portrait of a actress Ellen Andree and another fellow artist. The image is a pair of absinthe drinkers seated in a café during&gt;L’huere vert “the green hour”. This was also widely criticized at a London Art show mainly by Franco files afraid of veiling the truth about their city. Parisian woman began to enjoy to Absinthe and it was acceptable in Paris but in London this was not the case, another reason for the vast criticism of this photo. Meanwhile in England it was okay for fashionable women to inject themselves with morphine or consume either-soaked strawberries at dinner parties At this time around the mid 1800’s there were over 30,000 café’s and Cabarets frequented by those observing the Bohemian lifestyle
  • Opened in October 1899 was dazzling experiment design to design one and all. The seedy underclass mixed with the Nobles, at this “ Palace of Women”Artiste Adolphe Willete orchestrated the exotic theme and richly colored décor of the Mouline Rouge. Parisians turned out in the masses to view stand up comics, roving performer, carnival freak and the most infamous the can girls.In house were prostitutes, galleries, garden cafes and in the center a giant elephant which house an Arabian Themed night club complete with belly dancer and opium and through out the Green Fairy played a pivotal role. In the movie Kylie Minogue serenaded absinthe drinking hneri de toulous-lautrec (played by john leuizamo)
  • Kylie Monogue
  • The pernod distillery burned for more then 4 days, it was devastating lost and it took a total of 1 year to rebuild and to begin production again.
  • Absinthe popularity stretched across the US from San Fran to New York but no where was it as popular as New Orleans. A place of equal opportunity for all –gays, mixed couples, artists, woman etc. Absinthe was consumed by all Artist to musicians to story villed madams. The Absinthe house was at the heart of it fueling the spirits popularity. French-speaking travelers and immigrants alike carried their passion for absinthe with them to this vibrant port city, and before long, French apothecary Antoine Peychaud was doling out &apos;healthy&apos; absinthe cocktails from his Royal St. shop. The popularity of absinthe surged in French-speaking Louisiana, and when Henri Degas and Oscar Wilde spent time in New Orleans in the latter part of the 1800s, they had no trouble finding imported French and Swiss absinthes among other familiar comforts. By the advent of the 20th century, cafés like the famous Old Absinthe House were making a name for themselves by cooling the humid summers with Sazeracs, absinthe frappés, and even the occasional absinthe crème de glace. Unfortunately, it all came to a halt with the U.S. ban on absinthe in 1912 .1869 Cayetano Ferrer, a bartender took over the lease in 1874 and rechristened it the Absinthe Room. The establishment was infamous as a gathering of the minds type of watering hole. Attracted of array of famous imbibers including Walt Whitman, Mark Twain and the self proclaimed wickedest man in the world “ Aleister Crowley”Within the Absinthe house a decorative marble fountain used to drip cool water over sugar cubes into glass of Absinthe
  • Jade Liqueurs was founded by T.A. Breaux, a professional scientist who has dedicated over a decade of research toward resolving the mysteries and myths associated with absinthe. His quest for the unadulterated truth has taken him across the globe in search of obscure, overlooked, and forgotten information that documents this often maligned subject. Jade Liqueurs was established in 2000 for the sole purpose of offering the connoisseur the opportunity to experience unequivocal recreations of the classic absinthes that fueled the creative fires of the Belle Époque.The absinthes crafted by Jade Liqueurs are historically accurate and authentic down to unimaginably minute details.The absinthes recreated by Jade Liqueurs are made possible only because T. A. Breaux and his associates possess immaculately preserved bottles of the most famous original absinthes of the 19th century. Armed with an education and experience in applied analytical sciences, Mr. Breaux has worked in conjunction with other accomplished scientific minds in perfecting the sophisticated techniques needed to unlock the many secrets of the original liquor.
  • It is said that this drink was invented by Antoine Amadie Peychaud, a Creole apothecary who moved to New Orleans from the West Indies and set up shop in the French Quarter in the early part of the 19th Century. He dispensed a proprietary mix of aromatic bitters from an old family recipe, to relieve the ails of his clients (Peychaud&apos;s Bitters are still made in New Orleans and sold today, and are an essential component of any truly complete bar), and around the 1830s he became famous for a toddy he made for his friends. It consisted of French brandy mixed with his secret blend of bitters, a splash of water and a bit of sugar. According to legend he served his drink in the large end of an egg cup that was called a coquetier in French, and some say that the Americanized pronunciation of this as &quot;cocktail&quot; gave this type of drink its name. Nowadays we know for a fact that the word &quot;cocktail&quot; predated this by decades, first appearing in print in 1803 and first defined in print in 1806 as &quot;a mixture of spirits of any kind, water, sugar and bitters, vulgarly called a bittered sling.&quot; Research has also shown that brandy-based cocktails were being served in New Orleans before M. Peychaud began dispensing his concoction, and were most probably spiked with Stoughton&apos;s Bitters, a medicinal stomach bitters which didn&apos;t survive the 19th Century. This is, of course, not to say that M. Peychaud&apos;s cocktail wasn&apos;t popular locally -- it was, and became much more so as its fame spread.
  • gentleman named Sewell Taylor, owned a bar called Merchants Exchange Coffeehouse. Not long after, Mr. Taylor started a new business as a liquor importer, with one of his most popular products being a particular brand of Cognac called Sazerac-du-Forge et fils for which Mr. Taylor was the sole importer. Someone else took over the bar, changed its name to the Sazerac Coffee House, and history was made. Around 1870, a gentleman by the name of Thomas Handy took over as proprietor of the Sazerac House, and the primary ingredient was changed from cognac to rye whiskey due to popular American tastes as well as to the difficulty of obtaining cognac at the time -- the phyloxxera epidemic in Europe had devastated France&apos;s wine grape crops, which would take years to recover. Somewhere along the line a dash of absinthe was added, usually used to coat the glass with the excess discarded. Eventually absinthe was banned and was replaced by the locally-produced pastis called Herbsaint, which is ideal in a Sazerac and with which you&apos;ll find them made in New Orleans most often. The bar moved to the Roosevelt Hotel (now the Fairmont since 2009) in 1949, where the Sazerac Bar and Restaurant still stands. Since those days the hotel paid an annual fee to the Sazerac Companyfor the use of the name.The company, which produces, imports and distributes many different liquors, was founded in 1870 by the gentleman who bought the Sazerac Coffeehouse and the Peychaud family&apos;s secret recipe for the bitters.
  • Picasso introduction to Absinthe was instructive, he admired Alfred Jaren a write and playwright and took up drinking absinthe to emulate him. 1900’ Him and his close associate moved to BarcelonaPicasso began to receive some press for his work, but his art changed to whatWe know to be his most famous works when his associate committed suicide in 1901.Picassos subjects change to those of more dark subjects, beggars, prostitutes, street performers etc. This is also when he painted the absinthe drinker and the woman drinking absinthe. Picasso never seemed badly effected by Absinthe but we do see many portraits of addition1902-1903- Picasso turned to cubism. 1911 painted the glass of Absinthe
  • Absinthe became extremely popular in Barcelona, who was sporting their own version of the Parisian Bohemian lifestyle. Frequented by many celebrities it is thought this was where Ernest Hemingway discovered it her and then developed his taste for the spirit in Paris, while hob knobbing with the likes of Gertrude Stein a socialite who through famous parties with writers, photographers as the guest etc. Either way Hemmingway became a huge fan and developed his own drink call the “Death in the Afternoon” He also remarks of the spirit in such books as “ For Whom the bell tolls” Hemingway unfortunately committed suicide eleven years after winning a noble Prize in Literature.
  • Public drunkenness becoming more apparentAsylums filling up imbibers who seem to exert odd behaviorsPernod had a become a national icon for the elixir, one had to ask for Pernod and glass of Absinthe was served. Imposters used inferior and harmful chemicals, poisonous dyes, copper salts, aniline dye, turmeric etc. were being sold to the public and were especially popular among the lower classPernod filed lawsuits and posted warning to consumers, but they drank it anyway.
  • His affair with the green fairy started in Paris where he drank with other artist such Claude Monet, Paul Gauguin, Edgar Degas, Pierre- Augste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Fellow artist Lautrec and Gauguin introduce him to absinthe and hookers.The three of them moved to Arles together. Shortly afterwards in drunken haze Van Gogh confronted Gauguin with a razor in hand. Gauguin stared him down and escaped unharmed but later that evening Van Gough used the razor to cut off a piece of his own ear. Some say he was an addict but others say he did not drink that much. Many say his depression was a side affect of the drink but nonetheless ripe with syphilis he killed himself at the prime of his career.
  • The temperance movement of the 19th and early 20th century was an organized effort encouraging abstinenece or a least moderation. At the forefront of the this movement was mostly woman who had suffered the consequences of their husbands drinking additioncs
  • Color: Pacifique Absinthe Verte Superieure has a nice clear green color with yellow hints pre-louche; nice greenish opalescent color when louched, some pepper (?) sediment on top. Looks perfectly like a glass of fine, classic French absinthe. Louche: Very nice oil trails take their time for a fine show. Once clouds start to form it louches quickly, but there&apos;s still some complexity there. Classic layer of clear green liquor on top of louche. Quite nice. Aroma: Once you get passed the alcohol odor the &quot;trinity&quot; has a fresh fragrance. Other herbs are noticeable, too. Some pepper, light vanilla notes, add to a quality fragrance. Pacifique Absinthe Verte Superieure also contains angelica, coriander, hyssop, melissa and petite wormwood imparting a well-rounded herbal flavor. Flavor: Nice grain spirit imparts no bad taste or aftertaste. &quot;Trinity&quot; is good and balanced, what most reasonable people would want from a French-style absinthe. Perfectly good, herbs taste fresh ... but could the &quot;trinity&quot; benefit from being be slightly stronger? I haven&apos;t tasted a better French-style verte, so I stand by my rating here. Finish: Very fine, wormwood coats the tongue nicely but is not overwhelming. Other ingredients come together nicely. No ill aftereffects. Another good, clean grain spirit base that does not interfere with the stars of the show, the fresh herbs, some of which are allegedly organically grown at the distiller&apos;s estate.
  • If you were a drunk you were absinthe drinker whether you drank it or not. 1863 a species of root louse called Phylloxera Vastatrx, spread itself through the vineyard of Europe creating devastating effects. The wine industry soon found itself seriously crippled.The impact of the vineyards blights was a double edge swordOn one hand it increase wine prices, so the consumption of Absinthe increased but it also caused the wine makers to take the side of unlikely foe “ the Temperance movement” So now you had the wine makers, the Temperance movements and the politicians of the region looking for someone to blame for society ills and Absinthe was it.
  • Phylloxera infestation has been quelled, but the recovery was slow so Absinthe was still a major threat to the wine industry. Formally an Ali of Absinthe, there were now a formidable enemy and teamed up with the Temperance movement to spread bad press and rumors concerning Absinthes Toxicity. The public began to believe the allegations that the habitual use of absinthe resulted in eventual madness and ruin. Eventually together they got ban on Absinthe in France, this was 1915.1912 Absinthe was banned in the US. Absinthe house bar came under attack but thankfully the bar and the fountain was removed and hidden in a warehouse on Bourbon Street.
  • The best historic absinthes were at least 65 percent (130 proof)Sugar: Absinthe was a dry spirit. If a product labels itself as a liqueur/liquor, it most likely has sugar addedBase alcohol: Many modern absinthes are grain or beet neutral alc is perfectly acceptable for absinthe makingColor: Switzerland does allow absinthes to artificially dyed
  • American absinthe expert Ted Breaux broke down the chemical formulas for various pre-ban absinthes by using old recipes, then created his own recipe for the U.S. market and abiding by American regulations with a minimal amount of the key ingredient, thujone. According to Breaux, the amount of thujone, or wormwood, in pre-ban absinthes was much smaller than commonly believed, a claim that is still much debated.) This is how Viridian Spirits describes its Lucid absinthe, which it insists on keeping all lowercase: &quot;... distilled in strict accordance to traditional French methods, lucid is crafted in the historic Combier distillery, founded in 1834 and designed by Gustave Eiffel in the fabled Loire Valley of France. Each bottle of lucid is carefully prepared by skilled craftsmen, using ancient copper absinthe alembics. Unlike most contemporary imitators, lucid is distilled entirely from spirits and European herbs, and uses no artificial additives, oils, or dyes. lucid recalls the rich tradition of Absinthe, and is crafted using a full measure of Grande Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), Green Anise, Sweet Fennel, and other fine European herbs traditionally used in making fine Belle Epoque absinthe.&quot;
  • The most desirable louches are slow forming deliberately milky trails caused by the water dropping the absinths. Many consider thick louches to be a sign of the absinthes strength and quality, it can also signify the overuse of anethole rick star anise which can numb the taste buds.
  • Historically, absinthes was green, amber or clear and exhibited an underlying sweetness produced by macerating fresh herbs in a warm bath of neutral spirits and distilling. This primary distillation produced an aromatic blanche, or clear absinthe rich in flavors. Verte or green absinthe would go through a second process that infused additional hers to enhance the flavor profiles, as a result chlorophyll from the herbs was left behind, giving absinthe its green tint. The final color is determined by the types and amounts of the hers infused and mellow with age and turn amber green.
  • The chemical name for the principle active ingredient in wormwood is thujone. Thujone is a terpene and is related to menthol, which of course is known for its healing and restorative qualities. In its chemically pure form, it is a colorless liquid with a menthol-like aroma. Oil of Artemesia absinthium is typically approximately 60% thujone. Thujone – pronounced &quot;thujone&quot; with a soft &apos;J&apos; – is a naturally occurring substance, also found in the bark of the thuja, or white cedar, tree, and in other herbs besides wormwood - including tansy and the common sage used in cooking.Aside from absinthe, other popular liquors, including vermouth, Chartreuse, and Benedictine, also contain small amounts of thujone. In fact, vermouth, which was originally made using the flower heads from the wormwood plant, takes its name from the German &quot;wermut&quot; (&quot;wormwood&quot;).Most modern “legal” absinthes, in keeping with EU regulations, contains less than 10mg of thujone per liter,
  • Vieux Carré’s flavor and color are derived exclusively from 100% natural herbs. The flavor is complex with both familiar and intriguing notes. The deep green color is reminiscent of a vintage jewel. The spirit is not over filtered, preserving the flavors extracted through the natural coloring process. A miniscule herbal particulate is natural if found. The rich louche slowly builds as the essential oils refract light and create a dynamic opalescence. With the addition of chilled water the complexity of each herbal layer will come to fruition. The warm, long and lingering finish is harmonious, complex and subtle.
  • The green fairy

    1. 1. Absinthe<br />Absinthe is an alcoholic aperitif <br />Made from alcohol and distilled herbs amongst them grand wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) and green anise<br />It also usually including 4 other herbs: petite wormwood (Artemisia pontica), fennel, hyssop, and Melissa (lemon balm).<br />
    2. 2. WORMWOOD<br />aka Grand Wormwood aka Artemisia Absinthium- <br />Silvery green perennial herb similar to sage, whose white flowers and leaves are the Key<br />considered the cure all for all: intestinal ailments, worms, parasite, cramps pains, fever, flatulence <br />
    3. 3. Wormwood <br />Consumed by:<br />either grounded up the leaves and combing it with other herbs and some sort of sweet beer <br />Or by soaking the leaves with the herbs in a wine.<br />The first time it was drank for leisure was among the working class in Tudur England who macerated it in hot ale creating a draught called Purl. <br />
    4. 4. The Creation of Absinthe<br />Pierre Ordinaire- French expatriate living in Switzerland, working as a country doctor was set on creating a digestive tonic. <br />Distilled Absinthium it to remove the bitter qualities and to concentrate the flavors <br />
    5. 5. The History and Mystery <br />of the Green Fairy<br />
    6. 6. Pernod<br />1805 Secret formula landed in the hands of Major Dubied<br />His sons resurrected a distillery in Pontarlier, France. <br />Absinthe begins to take off and Pernod distillery goes into full swing <br />By 1850 twenty six stills were in full production producing 20 thousand liters a day. <br />
    7. 7. Absinthe Goes to War<br />1844-1847- The French Army was fighting in Algeria<br />Drops of Absinthe were prescribed to be <br />To cleanse the water<br />By methodically adding the water to the absinthe made it taste better- Absinthe drip. <br />Drinking of absinthe began to gain popularity and the news of the trend spread to Marseilles to Paris and beyond. <br />
    8. 8. Paris Bohemia<br />The industrial age resulted in a large population growth, especially between the ages of 15 to 30. <br />No Jobs = Bohemian lifestyle<br />Bohemia lifestyle:<br />The carefree, idle and widely promiscuous class of people who love the nightlife. <br />Drinking Absinthe became a big part of this lifestyle<br />L’huere verte (the green hour) <br />
    9. 9. The Artist, Writers who lived and died by Her<br />Charles BaudelairePoet<br />Arthur Rimbaud<br />poet<br />Paul Verlaine<br />Poet<br />Hated Parisians, died of addiction and syphilis<br />V Left wife, dated R, drank Absinthe, beat wife, went to jail lost everything, died<br />
    10. 10. The Artist, Writers who lived and died by Her<br />Alfred Jarry<br />Drank Absinthe undiluted<br />Eccentric playwright-<br />Alcoholic <br />Died at 34 tubercular meningitis<br />
    11. 11. EdouardManetThe Absinthe Drinker<br />
    12. 12. Edgar Degas“L’Absinthe” <br />
    13. 13. Moulin Rouge<br />
    14. 14. Moulin Rouge<br />
    15. 15. Absinthe-International Celebrity<br /><ul><li>End of the 19Century Absinthe is booming
    16. 16. Beginning to surpassing the sale of wine and beer in France
    17. 17. Pernod Factory burns down- minor set back
    18. 18. 1908 Multiple distilleries are built and are shipping Absinthe globally
    19. 19. The most famous and the ones that survived to this day are Pernod and Kubler distillery of Switzerland. </li></li></ul><li>London<br />Oscar Wilde<br />Successful writer/play write, happily married with children<br />Has affair <br />Jail time<br />syphilis <br />Died at 46<br />
    20. 20. Absinthe Comes to New Orleans<br />Consumed by all from Artist, musicians to new Orleans madams<br />At the heart of it was the Old Absinthe House<br />
    21. 21. Nouvelle-Orleans Superieure<br />Each batch of Nouvelle-Orleans is handcrafted by T.A. Breaux <br />The same authentic ingredients, methods and equipment used over a century ago<br />A French absinthe distilled in Samur, a small city near the Loire Valley at the Combier Distillery <br />This absinthe macerated and then distilled in beautiful antique absinthe specific copper pots stills under Ted's personal supervision. <br />. <br />
    22. 22. Nouvelle-Orleans Superieure<br />Appearance: Clear, bright, light green to it which is an indicator of the use of fresh wormwood <br />On swirling, leaves a very thin coat on the glass with scalloping and almost no legs developing. Louche is interesting to watch - puddles, pools and swirls mightily followed by a very rapid change to that lovely light opalescent green that signals a first class absinthe.First Impression: Intensely herbaceous and floral, with mint, anise (licorice smell), lemon balm, verbena and a host of others making for a heady bouquet. <br />Taste: a pronounced wormwood bitterness but in a pleasant round herbal way - not just bitter. Intense tingling with mint and anise notes with floral and citrus providing a aromatic backdrop. <br />Finishis long and pleasant with a minimal burn for a 124 proof product. Rather complex and multifaceted- bitter (wormwood and gentian), played off with the mint, verbena and (some) sugar with star anise both in front and on its heel coating your tongue while the coriander, fennel, mint and rosemary dance around in different areas of the tongue blending and playing off each other.<br />
    23. 23. Sazerac<br />Recipe<br />1/2 teaspoon absinthe1 sugar cube4 dashes Peychauds bitters2 ounces Sazerac Rye whiskeyStrip of lemon peel <br />Glass: Rocks Glass<br />
    24. 24. Antoine Amadie Peychaud, a Creole apothecary was serving it late night to his friends<br />The original formula was made with Brandy and no absinthe<br />Original known as the Merchants exchange coffee house- Sazerac’s were extremely popular<br />Around 1870 it change to the Sazerac Bar -<br />And the based spirit change from Cognac to Whisky<br />Absinthe added<br />
    25. 25. Picasso<br />The Absinthe Drinker<br />The woman drinking Absinthe<br />The Glass of Absinthe<br />
    26. 26. Kubler Superieure<br />Created in 1863 it was launched by J. Fritz Kübler in Motiers,Switzerland. Considered by some to be the birthplace of absinthe.<br />Principle ingredients are: grand wormwood and anise. <br />The grain base neutral spirit is distilled from Swiss Wheat and it includes hyssop, lemon balm, coriander, star anise, fennel, Roman Wormwood and mint<br />Distilled using the same traditional method that has been used for over one hundred years. <br />Following the initial maceration is a slow distillation process.<br />Neither sugar nor artificial coloring is added to the finished distillate. <br />The end product is bottled at 106 proof (53% ABV<br />
    27. 27. Kubler History<br />1863 J.F. Kübler, started the Kübler Absinthe tradition<br />It continued until the Swiss absinthe prohibition was enacted on October 7, 1910. <br />On October 10, 2001, exactly 91 years and three days after the start of the Swiss prohibition, the Swiss ban was lifted.<br />Kubler brand was revived by Fritz’s great grandson Yves, who still runs it today<br />The legalization of absinthe in Switzerland is largely due to Kübler's lobbying efforts<br />They also help get the band lifted in the United States and were one the first brands to be brought back legally into the united states.<br />
    28. 28. Death in the Afternoon<br />Recipe:1 shot absintheFill to the top with Champagne<br />Directions: Pour absinthe into a champagne flute and swirl it around to coat the sides; slowly pour the champagne to fill the glass. <br /> <br />
    29. 29. The Beginning of the End<br />1900’s Absinthe was starting to have wearing effects on the public<br />Knock off brands using inferior/harmful ingredients began to emerge<br />Numerous people admitted to the asylum for alcoholism, most confessed to being chronic absinthe drinkers. <br />True mental ill patients were many times deemed alcoholics or of having a drug addiction<br />
    30. 30. Lautrec – Van Gogh drinking Absinthe<br />
    31. 31. Vincent Van Gogh<br />One of the most famous and controversial Absinthe drinkers<br />Consumed along with many other famous artist; Renoir, Monet<br />The cutting of his own ear<br />Suffered from depression<br />killed himself at 37<br />
    32. 32. Victor Oliva: The Absinthe Drinker<br />
    33. 33. Beginning of the End<br />Temperance movement begins their battle against Absinthe<br />1907 “ Absinthe makes you crazy and criminal, provokes epilepsy and tuberculosis, and has dilled thousands of French people. It makes a ferocious beast of man, a martyr of woman, and a degenerate of the infant. It disorganizes and ruins the family and menaces the future of the country.”<br />
    34. 34. Pacifique Verte Superieure<br />Pacific Distillery is a family-owned and operated micro-distillery in Woodinville, Washington. <br />Respecting the artisanal hand craftsmanship of the past Pacific produces their spirits in extremely small batches. <br />Using only the finest spirit and organic botanicals carefully crafted in exact accordance with an 1855 French recipe and distillation process. <br />Proof: 124 % <br />
    35. 35. Pacifique Verte Superieure<br />Color: light green color<br />Nose: Intense nose with warm spiciness blended with crisp alpine notes- classic style<br />Flavor: brisk, herbal complexity <br />Finish: Long and pensive<br />
    36. 36. Temperance Movement<br />Green Fairy became the scape goat for ill’s of society<br />Alcoholic became known as having Absinthism<br />Temperance movement gains a new friend called Phylloxeraand in turn the wine makers<br />
    37. 37. 2003: Suggestion of mind altering substance<br />
    38. 38. Cry Murder<br />Two Heinous murders sealed Absinthe’s Fate.<br />August 1905 a farmer, killed his pregnant wife, their two daughters and attempted to kill himself after spending the day in fields working and drinking Absinthe. <br />His trial was labeled the Absinthe Murder<br />The second murder happened in Geneva a few days later<br /> A gentleman a known Absinthe drinker murdered his wife with a hatchet and revolver a<br />
    39. 39.
    40. 40. The Death of Absinthe<br />Outrage people of the region petitioned for Absinthe Ban<br />Producers banned together to try to save it with no avail<br />October 7th, 1910- Absinthe was officially banned in Switzerland<br />Swiss ban put the ball in motion <br />The Temperance Movement/Wine industry gave it is final blow<br />
    41. 41. Scattering and Survival <br />Pernod- reformulated their product post Prohibition. <br />Wormwood component was removed<br />Alcoholic strength reduced<br />Sugar added to the mix<br />1918- The continued produced a legit absinthe in Spain where the spirit was not outlawed<br />
    42. 42. Fake Vs. Real Absinthe<br />Real absinthe should be no less than 50% alc<br />It should be sweetened <br />It should not contain artificial coloring<br />It must contains wormwood, Anise and Fennel <br />Fake Absinthe<br />Commonly high-proof base alcohol <br />Artificial green coloring<br />Typically does not louche and extremely bitter<br />
    43. 43. Absinthe Label Checklist<br />Minimum of 50% alc<br />No added sugar <br />Look for the term distilled<br />The base alc of the best absinthes are grape/wine derived<br />Avoid Artificially colored absinthes (identified with an FD&C number if dye is used)<br />
    44. 44. Lucid<br />2007- The first genuine absinthe to available in the US in over 95 years<br />Created by T. A. Breaux who conducted the chemical analysis between old and new absinthe <br />It contains the same percentage of Wormwood as the original Absinthe<br />It created and distilled in the traditional way<br />
    45. 45. The Absinthe Drip<br />1. 5 oz Lucid<br />1 sugar cube<br />4.5 to 6 oz of ice cold water<br />Directions: <br />pour the absinthe into the glass<br />Place the slotted spoon with sugar cube on top<br />Slowly pour or drip the ice cold water over the sugar cube into the absinthe<br />Watch as the Louche (white cloud forms) <br />When the mixture is completely cloudy, the drink should be ready.<br />Stir, taste for strength and adjust if needed <br />
    46. 46. Louche<br />Cold water allows the essential oils to precipitate of their suspension. <br />It releases the aromas and flavors<br />Most desirable are slow forming<br />
    47. 47. Green Tint<br />Is the effect of the maceration and distillation of various herbs.<br />Which results in the chlorophyll from certain herbs to be left behind giving the spirit a green tint<br />
    48. 48. Thujone: Madness or Myth<br />Thujone a natural constituent of wormwood, and regarded as its 'active' ingredient. <br />Thujone was said to be hallucinogenic and/or harmful, causing the distinct syndrome 'absinthism'; <br />The results of the analysis show quite conclusively that the thujone concentration of pre-ban absinthe has been grossly over-estimated in the past. <br />
    49. 49. Thujone: Madness or Myth<br />Papers published in the 1980's and 1990's postulated thujone concentrations as high as 260 mg/L, on the basis of purely theoretical calculations<br />modern absinthes made according to historical recipes don't have anything like these levels of thujone ' <br />The total thujone content of the 13 pre-ban samples was found to range between 0.5 and 48.3 mg/L. <br />
    50. 50. Thujone Conclusion<br />You would have to drink over 7 liters of Absinthe in order to feel the harmful effects of Thujone.<br />Conclusion you would long dead of alcohol poisoning before that happened. <br />
    51. 51. Vieux –Carre Superieure<br />Released in 2008<br />Batch distilled using a “double maceration” Grande Wormwood and Petite Wormwood. Green and Star Anise, Fennel Doux Provence, Melissa, Genepi, Hyssop <br />Vieux Carré is an original artisan spirit that combines historicprocesses with a modern expertise.<br />Our custom copper-pot still was imported from Scotland, produced by Forsythes<br />
    52. 52. Vieux –Carre Superieure<br />Color: Pale green with opalescent louche<br />Nose: Fresh yet slightly briny and spicy <br />Taste: multilayered with subtle herbal undertones, anise and fennel are well balance with wormwood <br />Considered the Gold Standard for the Absinthe Category<br />
    53. 53. Elayne Duke<br />www.dukeontherocks.com<br />C:347-751-5563<br />Books to read: <br /> A taste of Absinthe<br />Absinthe sip of seduction<br />

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