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Tequila and the cocktails that made it famous
 

Tequila and the cocktails that made it famous

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Insight to the history and production of tequila. As well the background stories to the Margarita, Sangrita, the Paloma and few more.

Insight to the history and production of tequila. As well the background stories to the Margarita, Sangrita, the Paloma and few more.

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  • Long ago, in earth earliest days, humans found their world bathed in darkness. The evil goddess Tzintzimitl had consumed the sun and all its light. Quetzalcoatl , the god of redemption and giver of life , was angered by Tzintzimitl’s deed and ascended to the heavens to give battle. While pursuing Tzintzimitl he discovered Mayahuel , her beautiful granddaughter who was being held against her will. Quetzalcoatl instantly fell in love with Mayahuel and returned to earth with her at his side. This infuriated Tzintzimitl and she searched everywhere for the pair . They were forced to hide and scurry from place to place keeping one step ahead of the evil goddess.
  • Weary of running , Quetzalcoatl determined to disguise himself and Mayahuel as branches on a tree carefully positioned so the breeze would cause the two branches to sweep and caress each other. This scheme was eventually discovered and in a fit a rage Tzintzimitl ripped the branch possessing the soul of Mayahuel from the tree and broke it in to tiny pieces . Devastated, Quetzalcoatl slew Tzintzimitl returning light to this world but his love was gone. He buried the pieces of the broken branch and drenched the ground in his tears giving life to the first agave plant.
  • Quetzalcoatl drank the plant’s sweet nectar but it gave him little joy until the gods bestowed "special" properties to the agave to comfort Quetzalcoatl’s heart and soul . This, according to Aztec legend, is how the agave came into existence and for thousands of years the natural fermenting nectar of the agave has been used in ceremonies of religious and cultural significance. Today, Mayahuel is considered by the Aztec people to be the goddess of agave. Today, standing firmly in the 21st century, we still find Tequila, more than any other spirit, to be shrouded in mystery, awe, and occasionally foreboding.
  • Agave in Mayan culture means noble Agave is many times mistaken for a cactus but actually is a succulent plant consider to be part of the Agavaceae family Over 300 species described but only 200 recognized Only the Blue Weber Agave can be used in the making of Tequila Aquimiel/Agave Nectar production: Up to 9 liters
  • Pulque (aka lightening nectar, a gift from the gods is wine-like liquid made from fermented syrup extracted from the heart of the Agave plant. Considered a traditional beverage (3-4 % alcohol) made from the juice of the maguey or agave plant . Pulque is fermented, not distilled and that is why it is different then Tequila. It was probably one of the earliest alcoholic beverages produced in Central America, just as beers were produced before liquors in other parts of the world.
  • Unlike tequila , most Mexicans turn up their noses at the mention of pulque . It is considered a crude, peasant drink , and not nearly as desirable as beer and other spirits. Part of pulque ’s bad reputation comes from years of abuse by alcoholic campesinos (farmers), who would drink gallons of it daily, starting in the morning and going all day.
  • The Spaniards arrive in 1515 and with them their thirst for wine and cognac Grapes do not grow well in the hot climate They are not interested in drinking the local spirit of Pulque 1523 they introduce the pot still to natives and produced a much a stronger drink called Vino de Mezcal
  • The Spaniards arrive in 1515 and with them their thirst for wine and cognac Grapes do not grow well in the hot climate They are not interested in drinking the local spirit of Pulque 1523 they introduce the pot still to natives and produced a much a stronger drink called Vino de Mezcal
  • The Spaniards arrive in 1515 and with them their thirst for wine and cognac Grapes do not grow well in the hot climate They are not interested in drinking the local spirit of Pulque 1523 they introduce the pot still to natives and produced a much a stronger drink called Vino de Mezcal
  • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians which they later shorten to Tequila In this town they discover the blue agave plant (still call it Mezcal plant) 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity, Spaniards don’t like the competition so product of this local spirit is banned 1636 the Gov needs money to fund the wars, production is legal again but Government imposed taxes and rules and regulations on the manufacturing of the mezcal
  • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians which they later shorten to Tequila In this town they discover the blue agave plant (still call it Mezcal plant) 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity, Spaniards don’t like the competition so product of this local spirit is banned 1636 the Gov needs money to fund the wars, production is legal again but Government imposed taxes and rules and regulations on the manufacturing of the mezcal
  • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians which they later shorten to Tequila In this town they discover the blue agave plant (still call it Mezcal plant) 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity, Spaniards don’t like the competition so product of this local spirit is banned 1636 the Gov needs money to fund the wars, production is legal again but Government imposed taxes and rules and regulations on the manufacturing of the mezcal
  • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians which they later shorten to Tequila In this town they discover the blue agave plant (still call it Mezcal plant) 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity, Spaniards don’t like the competition so product of this local spirit is banned 1636 the Gov needs money to fund the wars, production is legal again but Government imposed taxes and rules and regulations on the manufacturing of the mezcal
  • 1905 they were first distillery to put their tequila in bottles
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time- JC 1800 names is inspired 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country. Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made 1905 –Blue Weber Agave name after a German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber who named the plant after himself-
  • In 1910, El Centennario (makers of today's  Siete Leguas) was founded, the first distillery in the highlands (Los Altos). 1910 Mexican revolution- Tequila becomes a symbol of national pride 1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world killing over 100 million people. Due to the lack of medicine in Mexico the doctors prescribe Tequila, lime and salt as a treatment against the flu 1920: Prohibition occurred in the US and many wealthy people went South of border for libations July 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735. Timmons notes that this phenomenal growth in tourists created the need to build two new international bridges. The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • In 1910, El Centennario (makers of today's  Siete Leguas) was founded, the first distillery in the highlands (Los Altos). 1910 Mexican revolution- Tequila becomes a symbol of national pride 1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world killing over 100 million people. Due to the lack of medicine in Mexico the doctors prescribe Tequila, lime and salt as a treatment against the flu 1920: Prohibition occurred in the US and many wealthy people went South of border for libations July 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735. Timmons notes that this phenomenal growth in tourists created the need to build two new international bridges. The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • In 1910, El Centennario (makers of today's  Siete Leguas) was founded, the first distillery in the highlands (Los Altos). 1910 Mexican revolution- Tequila becomes a symbol of national pride 1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world killing over 100 million people. Due to the lack of medicine in Mexico the doctors prescribe Tequila, lime and salt as a treatment against the flu 1920: Prohibition occurred in the US and many wealthy people went South of border for libations July 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735. Timmons notes that this phenomenal growth in tourists created the need to build two new international bridges. The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • Tile Tequila “Shot at Love”
  • 1920: Prohibition: Americans flee to south of the border July 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735 The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • officially initiating its international protection. For a product to be labeled "Tequila", it must be produced in the declared territory (shown below) of Mexico, and the producer must follow the Official Standard for Tequila , known as NOM-006-SCFI-2005.
  • The earliest citation for a cocktail recipe that is comprised of Tequila, Cointreau (i.e. Triple Sec), and lime juice is from 1937, and was listed in the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book, by W. J. Tarling; And the recipe is stated as The Cafe Royal Cocktail Book also lists a drink called a Toreador, which is the same proportions as the Picador, but it substitutes the Cointreau for Apricot Brandy. Unfortunately, the above libation is not the drink that would became famous as the Margarita, even though it is exactly the same recipe. What we are looking for is an American drink, made on American or Mexican soil, with the same ingredients, but which is less refined than its British counterpart. Please note that there is nothing to say that someone didn't read the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book and then just renamed the drink. American Advertising.
  • The Cafe Royal Cocktail Book also lists a drink called a Toreador, which is the same proportions as the Picador, but it substitutes the Cointreau for Apricot Brandy. Even though the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book is a publication of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild), it is not a cause for national pride on the part of the British Cocktail Contingent? Unfortunately, the above libation is not the drink that would became famous as the Margarita, even though it is exactly the same recipe. What we are looking for is an American drink, made on American or Mexican soil, with the same ingredients, but which is less refined than its British counterpart. Please note that there is nothing to say that someone didn't read the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book and then just renamed the drink. American Advertising.
  • Another cocktail that gets touted often as a proto-Margarita is the Tequila Daisy, this idea stems from similarities with older daisy recipes and the Margarita. However, there are two breeds of Daisy cocktail; one served short, made with spirit, sugar, sour and orange liqueur and another served long, with spirit, grenadine, sour, and soda water. The big problem is that there are no specific recipes for a Tequila Daisy from the 1930s or 1940s, although the name is mentioned frequently enough.
  • Another cocktail that gets touted often as a proto-Margarita is the Tequila Daisy, this idea stems from similarities with older daisy recipes and the Margarita. However, there are two breeds of Daisy cocktail; one served short, made with spirit, sugar, sour and orange liqueur, and another served long, with spirit, grenadine, sour, and soda water. The big problem is that there are no specific recipes for a Tequila Daisy from the 1930s or 1940s, although the name is mentioned frequently enough. In the 1939 book, Saber-tooth Curriculum, the protagonist is frequently depicted as consuming tequila daisies; Even though there are 5 mentions of the drink with the books pages, the author does not think it worthy to mention the actual recipe. Perhaps it was so well known that mentioning such a commonplace recipe was deemed unnecessary, alas the facts are unknown at this time. The Saber-tooth Curriculum, by Abner J Peddiwell, 1939 "If you don't mind," he announced, "I will have one of these tequila daisies." It seems strange that a drink which was apparently so well-known would just disappear off the map; Unless, as the theory goes, Daisy (the word) was simply translated into Spanish (Margarita), and thus the Tequila Daisy became the Tequila Margarita.
  • Perhaps it was so well known that mentioning such a commonplace recipe was deemed unnecessary, alas the facts are unknown at this time. It seems strange that a drink which was apparently so well-known would just disappear off the map; Unless, as the theory goes, Daisy (the word) was simply translated into Spanish (Margarita), and thus the Tequila Daisy became the Tequila Margarita.
  • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico both claim to have invented the drink during this time. 1935 - "Willie," the bartender at Las Dos Republicas in Matamoros, Mexico created the drink for Marguerite Hemery, a friend of the restaurant's owner. When she tasted it, she said, "That's really wonderful! What's it called?" Willie asked her what her name was and after she told him,  he replied, "this drink then will be called 'Marguerita'." 1936 - Danny Negrete at the bar of the Hotel Garci-Crespo in Puebla, Mexico. Danny served the drink as a wedding present to Margarita, his brother David's fiancé, the day before their wedding. (Some versions of the story say that Margarita was Danny's girlfriend.) Doña Bertha, who owned a cantina in Taxco, Mexico. She was famous for her Tequila drink, but it was not, as some presume, a Margarita; It was a TequilaLimonada.The earliest reference to Doña Bertha's special ALL THE BEST IN MEXICO", by Sidney Clark, 1949. "...in Taxco, where a famous tequila cocktail called the "Bertha" is an "The Bertha, made with lime juice and simple syrup, looks like a Tom Collins but tastes remarkably like a Daiquiri." ,
  • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico both claim to have invented the drink during this time. 1935 - "Willie," the bartender at Las Dos Republicas in Matamoros, Mexico created the drink for Marguerite Hemery, a friend of the restaurant's owner. When she tasted it, she said, "That's really wonderful! What's it called?" Willie asked her what her name was and after she told him,  he replied, "this drink then will be called 'Marguerita'." 1936 - Danny Negrete at the bar of the Hotel Garci-Crespo in Puebla, Mexico. Danny served the drink as a wedding present to Margarita, his brother David's fiancé, the day before their wedding. (Some versions of the story say that Margarita was Danny's girlfriend.) Doña Bertha, who owned a cantina in Taxco, Mexico. She was famous for her Tequila drink, but it was not, as some presume, a Margarita; It was a TequilaLimonada.The earliest reference to Doña Bertha's special ALL THE BEST IN MEXICO", by Sidney Clark, 1949. "...in Taxco, where a famous tequila cocktail called the "Bertha" is an "The Bertha, made with lime juice and simple syrup, looks like a Tom Collins but tastes remarkably like a Daiquiri." ,
  • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico both claim to have invented the drink during this time. 1935 - "Willie," the bartender at Las Dos Republicas in Matamoros, Mexico created the drink for Marguerite Hemery, a friend of the restaurant's owner. When she tasted it, she said, "That's really wonderful! What's it called?" Willie asked her what her name was and after she told him,  he replied, "this drink then will be called 'Marguerita'." 1936 - Danny Negrete at the bar of the Hotel Garci-Crespo in Puebla, Mexico. Danny served the drink as a wedding present to Margarita, his brother David's fiancé, the day before their wedding. (Some versions of the story say that Margarita was Danny's girlfriend.) Doña Bertha, who owned a cantina in Taxco, Mexico. She was famous for her Tequila drink, but it was not, as some presume, a Margarita; It was a TequilaLimonada.The earliest reference to Doña Bertha's special ALL THE BEST IN MEXICO", by Sidney Clark, 1949. "...in Taxco, where a famous tequila cocktail called the "Bertha" is an "The Bertha, made with lime juice and simple syrup, looks like a Tom Collins but tastes remarkably like a Daiquiri." ,
  • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant. Durlesser tells The Van Nuys News in January 1955 that he invented the margarita in 1937. The August/September 1966 issue of Bon Appetit also credits Durlesser with inventing the drink, but "in 1936 when...[Durlesser] was asked to duplicate a drink a lady customer had once tasted in Mexico. He put together a drink which pleased the lady, whose name was Margaret, and today his 'duplication' is well known as the Margarita cocktail." The magazine also reports that Durlesser entered the drink "in a national competition of original drinks and it won third place." The claim has not been corroborated.  1940s - Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed to have invented the margarita in honor of Rita Hayworth , whose real name was Margarita Carmen Cansino. Prior to her film career, Cansino worked as part of a dance act with her father at The Foreign Club in Tijuana, as well as the Agua Caliente Racetrack. 1942, July 4th - Francisco "Pancho" Morales at Tommy's Place in Juarez, Mexico. A woman requested a Magnolia, but the bartender, Pancho, did not know the recipe - only that it contained Cointreau. (A magnolia is made with brandy, Cointreau, and an egg yolk - topped with Champagne.) He quickly improvised, and the result was the margarita.
  • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant. Durlesser tells The Van Nuys News in January 1955 that he invented the margarita in 1937. The August/September 1966 issue of Bon Appetit also credits Durlesser with inventing the drink, but "in 1936 when...[Durlesser] was asked to duplicate a drink a lady customer had once tasted in Mexico. He put together a drink which pleased the lady, whose name was Margaret, and today his 'duplication' is well known as the Margarita cocktail." The magazine also reports that Durlesser entered the drink "in a national competition of original drinks and it won third place." The claim has not been corroborated.  1940s - Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed to have invented the margarita in honor of Rita Hayworth , whose real name was Margarita Carmen Cansino. Prior to her film career, Cansino worked as part of a dance act with her father at The Foreign Club in Tijuana, as well as the Agua Caliente Racetrack. 1942, July 4th - Francisco "Pancho" Morales at Tommy's Place in Juarez, Mexico. A woman requested a Magnolia, but the bartender, Pancho, did not know the recipe - only that it contained Cointreau. (A magnolia is made with brandy, Cointreau, and an egg yolk - topped with Champagne.) He quickly improvised, and the result was the margarita.
  • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant. Durlesser tells The Van Nuys News in January 1955 that he invented the margarita in 1937. The August/September 1966 issue of Bon Appetit also credits Durlesser with inventing the drink, but "in 1936 when...[Durlesser] was asked to duplicate a drink a lady customer had once tasted in Mexico. He put together a drink which pleased the lady, whose name was Margaret, and today his 'duplication' is well known as the Margarita cocktail." The magazine also reports that Durlesser entered the drink "in a national competition of original drinks and it won third place." The claim has not been corroborated.  1940s - Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed to have invented the margarita in honor of Rita Hayworth , whose real name was Margarita Carmen Cansino. Prior to her film career, Cansino worked as part of a dance act with her father at The Foreign Club in Tijuana, as well as the Agua Caliente Racetrack. 1942, July 4th - Francisco "Pancho" Morales at Tommy's Place in Juarez, Mexico. A woman requested a Magnolia, but the bartender, Pancho, did not know the recipe - only that it contained Cointreau. (A magnolia is made with brandy, Cointreau, and an egg yolk - topped with Champagne.) He quickly improvised, and the result was the margarita.
  • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria, on the road between Rosarito Beach and Tijuana, Mexico. ( The Complete Book of Spirits dates this as 1938, but an article from the Copley News Service quotes Herrera with "1947 or 1948.") A showgirl named Marjorie King stopped in the bar, and she claimed to be allergic to all forms of booze, except tequila, which she needed mixed. He experimented and invented the margarita, naming it in her honor. 1947 - Al Hernandez and Morris Locke, La Plaza Restaurant in La Jolla, California. Calling California Home by Heather Waite attributes bartender Al Hernandez and La Plaza owner Morris Locke as the inventors of the margarita; however, according to an article in the San Diego Union-Tribune , Hernandez invented the drink after Locke had tasted something similar at Rancho La Gloria. Hernandez then experimented and came up with his own version. (Herrara's used lemon juice, Hernandez and Locke used lime juice.)
  • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria, on the road between Rosarito Beach and Tijuana, Mexico. ( The Complete Book of Spirits dates this as 1938, but an article from the Copley News Service quotes Herrera with "1947 or 1948.") A showgirl named Marjorie King stopped in the bar, and she claimed to be allergic to all forms of booze, except tequila, which she needed mixed. He experimented and invented the margarita, naming it in her honor. 1947 - Al Hernandez and Morris Locke, La Plaza Restaurant in La Jolla, California. Calling California Home by Heather Waite attributes bartender Al Hernandez and La Plaza owner Morris Locke as the inventors of the margarita; however, according to an article in the San Diego Union-Tribune , Hernandez invented the drink after Locke had tasted something similar at Rancho La Gloria. Hernandez then experimented and came up with his own version. (Herrara's used lemon juice, Hernandez and Locke used lime juice.)
  • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria, on the road between Rosarito Beach and Tijuana, Mexico. ( The Complete Book of Spirits dates this as 1938, but an article from the Copley News Service quotes Herrera with "1947 or 1948.") A showgirl named Marjorie King stopped in the bar, and she claimed to be allergic to all forms of booze, except tequila, which she needed mixed. He experimented and invented the margarita, naming it in her honor. 1947 - Al Hernandez and Morris Locke, La Plaza Restaurant in La Jolla, California. Calling California Home by Heather Waite attributes bartender Al Hernandez and La Plaza owner Morris Locke as the inventors of the margarita; however, according to an article in the San Diego Union-Tribune , Hernandez invented the drink after Locke had tasted something similar at Rancho La Gloria. Hernandez then experimented and came up with his own version. (Herrara's used lemon juice, Hernandez and Locke used lime juice.)
  • February 22 nd is national Margarita Day 1970 is when the first frozen margarita was created 2008 # one selling drink in America
  • officially initiating its international protection. For a product to be labeled "Tequila", it must be produced in the declared territory (shown below) of Mexico, and the producer must follow the Official Standard for Tequila , known as NOM-006-SCFI-2005.
  • First Robert Denton launched Chinaco's ultra-premium tequila into the market. In 1983, it was the first ultra premium on the shelves. As noted on Wine Patrol's site , "Denton marketed the tequila like a fine cognac, and demanded the highest prices of any tequila on the market. The rich, elegant Chinaco Añejo lived up to the promises, and almost single handedly created the North American market for upscale tequila. “ Chinaco Closes in the 1990’s Cabo Wabo sammy hager and Patron were established an launched
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The AOC, or Appellation de Origin Controllee was published on April 13, 1978 in the Registry of Appellations of Origin under the Lisbon Agreement created by the World Intellectual Property Organization . However, it wasn't until 1996 that Mexico, as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), signed an international agreement for all countries to recognize tequila as a Denomination of Origin product from 1999 - bacteria destroying the plants, Tequilas popularity increases causing 25% of the crop is wiped out 2000 the minimum amount of agave required in a mixto is dropped from 30% to 51% 2001 Prices are at an all time high due to the popularity of Tequila in the US and around the world. Many distilleries close as a result of the Agave shortage and their ability to stay competitive in the marketplace. For once Tequila is receiving the recognition and price it deserves. Only 8% of the tequila being exported is 100% blue agave
  • The paloma (Spanish for "dove") is a tequila -based cocktail, most commonly prepared by mixing tequila with a grapefruit-flavored soda such as Squirt or Jarritos and served on the rocks with a lime wedge. Optionally, the glass may also be rimmed with salt. Alternatively, the grapefruit soda can be replaced with fresh white or red grapefruit juice ( jugo de toronja ), club soda (sugar optional), and fresh-squeezed lime juice. The paloma is the most popular tequila-based cocktail in Mexico. The drink was invented in the tiny town of Tequila in Jalisco, which sleepily charms with cobblestone streets and distilleries nestled between unassuming houses and shops without signs. The cocktail was created at La Capilla, the oldest bar in town, by Don Javier Delgado Corona, grandson of the bar’s original owner. It’s essentially a tequila highball made with fresh lime, Squirt or whatever grapefruit soda you prefer (or fresh grapefruit and soda if you wanna get all fancy), served with a salted rim. It’s simple, refreshing, and far more popular locally than a Margarita.  
  • 1978: Appellation of Origin for Tequila was registered Blue Agave used to make tequila can only come from five of the 29 states Those regions are: Jalisco, Guanajuato, Tamaulipas, Nayarit, Michoacán Largest Region in Jalisco- Like wine and the areas on which grapes grown have a big impact on the flavor the same is true for the regions on which the agave is grown
  • Tequila is close to several other towns that produce its eponymous spirit: Amatitan and Arenal,
  • Tequila is close to several other towns that produce its eponymous spirit: Amatitan and Arenal,
  • Tequila is close to several other towns that produce its eponymous spirit: Amatitan and Arenal,
  • The night time air is much cooler and is said to slow down the maturity of plant, creating a sweeter juicer agave Two other tequila-producing towns in Los Altos should be noted: Atotonilco el Alto (population 26,044), southeast of Arandas, and Tepatitlán de Morelos, west of Arandas, (population 82,975).   Making tequila in Los Altos became legal in 1937, and the Camarena family started producing their own that year, starting with Don Felipe, and carried on through his son, Don Felipe, and his grandson, Carlos
  • The night time air is much cooler and is said to slow down the maturity of plant, creating a sweeter juicer agave Two other tequila-producing towns in Los Altos should be noted: Atotonilco el Alto (population 26,044), southeast of Arandas, and Tepatitlán de Morelos, west of Arandas, (population 82,975).   Making tequila in Los Altos became legal in 1937, and the Camarena family started producing their own that year, starting with Don Felipe, and carried on through his son, Don Felipe, and his grandson, Carlos
  • The night time air is much cooler and is said to slow down the maturity of plant, creating a sweeter juicer agave Two other tequila-producing towns in Los Altos should be noted: Atotonilco el Alto (population 26,044), southeast of Arandas, and Tepatitlán de Morelos, west of Arandas, (population 82,975).   Making tequila in Los Altos became legal in 1937, and the Camarena family started producing their own that year, starting with Don Felipe, and carried on through his son, Don Felipe, and his grandson, Carlos
  • This is a proprietary distillation process that retains more of the agave flavor and creates a better-tasting Tequila, one that reflects the true full character and essence of Mexico's prized blue agave plant.
  • a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in taste While most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato. A popular recipe in Guadalajara was said to have originated from the leftover juices (of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin . As the fruit salad, known to Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo , was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate , while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine , cucumber , papaya , mango and jicama . . Sangrita is used in a drink known as " The Mexican Flag ", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in taste While most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato. A popular recipe in Guadalajara was said to have originated from the leftover juices (of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin . As the fruit salad, known to Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo , was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate , while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine , cucumber , papaya , mango and jicama . . Sangrita is used in a drink known as " The Mexican Flag ", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • Sangrita (meaning “little blood”), whose origin dates back to the 1920s, is a customary partner to a shot of straight tequila blanco ; a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in taste. Before increased worldwide popularity and corporate interest in tequila in the late 1990s and early 21st century, few outside of the Mexican Pacific region bordering the state of Jalisco , where tequila was mainly produced and consumed, knew of the existence of sangrita, and much less its recipe. As popularity grew, so did commercial efforts to recreate the mysterious red, spicy drink that was served with tequila. In fact the drink was not that mysterious. While most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato. A popular recipe in Guadalajara (Jalisco's largest city) was said to have originated from the leftover juices (mainly orange) of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin . As the fruit salad, known to tapatios (Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo , was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate , while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine , cucumber , papaya , mango and jicama . Traditionally, sangrita is served with tequila blanco, but it can also accompany tequila reposado . The tequila and sangrita are each poured into a separate shot glass (or caballito ) and the two are alternately sipped, not chased. Sangrita is used in a drink known as " The Mexican Flag ", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • The horse on the bottle is recognize Pancho Villa a famous general and central character of the Mexican revolution. Seite Leguas was his favorite horse and he would be often be seen riding him. He was not by all but respected by one particular businessman Don Ignacio Gonzales Vargas who named his Tequila after the generals favorite horse
  • That same year, American artist Ron Cooper founded Del Maguey Mezcal to export several artisanal 'single village' mezcals. His efforts to position mezcal as a natural, premium product has created a new image for mezcal over the past few years and his products garner raves from reviewers.   Del Maguey limits production of its single-village brands to only 3,200 bottles a year - and only 500 of the rare wild tobala mezcal.   1999 Consejo Regulador de Mezcal (CRM) and a Camara (Chamber) have been established to monitor and regulate the mezcal industry in the same way similar associations do for tequila, and assure compliance with the NORMAS that govern mezcal.   New labelling regulations were introduced in 1999, based on those already in use for tequila: 100% agave mezcals are now labeled as such, and whether the mezcal was bottled at the distillery (envasado de origin) or elsewhere in Mexico (envasado en Mexico). All mezcal must be bottled in Mexico: no bulk sales are allowed for export. The agave shortage that affected tequila production had a backlash effect to mezcal. Tequila producers were sending trucks to Oaxaca to buy espadin and other agaves. As the demand grew, agave prices in Oaxaca skyrocketed, four to five times their initial cost. Small mezcal producers found it difficult or even impossible to produce mezcal
  • Agave: over 28 varities can be used Espadin is very popular one planted for two year 2 years they are uprooted, leaves tightly bound and the roots are cut off. They are left in the shade to heal for about fifteen days. transported to the outlying hills they are transplanted and left to grow for another four to ten years. Typically plant growth- 6- 12yrs to mature agave hearts are placed in a rock-lined conical pit (palenque) about twelve feet in diameter and eight feet deep. Roasted over hot rocks that have been heated with an intense mesquite fire. A layer of the previously-used moist fiber from the plant covers them, followed by woven palm-fiber mats (petate) and finally a layer of earth. They bake this way for 2 to 3 days sometime as long as 8
  • The pinas are grinded using a traditional Tahona to separate the pulp from the fibers Pulp Is macerated in water and left to natural ferment for up to 10days The resulting liquid is called Pulque Distillation: Typically 2x in a copper pot still Aging usually 3months to a year The mezcal solids and liquid (tepache) are then transferred to a copper still that is heated by wood fire, vaporized and condensed. Each distillation takes about twenty-four hours, and it’s repeated twice

Tequila and the cocktails that made it famous Tequila and the cocktails that made it famous Presentation Transcript

  • TEQUILA and the cocktails that made it famous with Elayne Werns
  • The Tommy Margarita
    • 2 oz. Don Julio Blanco
    • 1 oz. Fresh lime juice
    • 1 oz. Agave Nectar
    • Garnish with a lime wedge
    • Served over ice in a rocks glass
  • Tequila
      • TEQUILA’S HISTORY
      • History of Tequila
        • The Margarita
        • La Paloma
      • Creation of Tequila
        • Sangrita
      • Tequila vs Mezcal
        • Smoke and Ginger
      • Tasting:
        • Don Julio Blanco
        • Jose Cuervo Platino
        • Excellia Reposado
        • Seite Leguas Anejo
  • Gift from the Gods
    • STORY OF MAYAHUEL
    Tzintzimitl
  • Gift from the Gods Quetzalcoatl
  • Gift from the Gods Mayahuel
  • Mayahuel Bar Mayahuel 304 E, 6 TH Street (between 2nd Ave & 1st Ave) NEW YORK, NY 10003 (212) 253-5888 www.mayahuelny.com
  • Agave
      • All a man or woman ever needs
      • Needle and Thread
      • A roof
      • Timber
      • Nutrients
      • …………………………
      • Tequila
      • Sex
  • Pulque
  • Pulque
  • HISTORY OF TEQUILA
  • The Spanish Have Arivved
    • 1515 The Spaniards arrive in Mexico
  • The Spanish Have Arivved
    • 1515 The Spaniards arrive in Mexico
    • 1523 they introduce the pot still to natives
  • The Spanish Have Arivved
    • 1515 The Spaniards arrive in Mexico
    • 1523 they introduce the pot still to natives
    • Vino De Mezcal is created
  • Arrival of the Spaniards
    • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians
  • Arrival of the Spaniards
    • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians
    • Blue agave plant is discovered
  • Arrival of the Spaniards
    • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians
    • Blue agave plant is discovered
    • 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity
  • Arrival of the Spaniards
    • 1532 Spaniards go north to Jalisco here they discover the Tiquili Indians
    • Blue agave plant is discovered
    • 1500’s Mezcal starts to gain popularity
    • 1636 the Gov imposed taxes and rules and regulations on the manufacturing of the mezcal
  • Jose Cuervo
    • 1758 the government grants the Cuervo family a parcel of land in Jalisco
    • 1795 King Ferdinand grants the first license to the Cuervo family to distill Mezcal
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
    • 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
    • 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas
    • 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
    • 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas
    • 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities
    • 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country.
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
    • 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas
    • 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities
    • 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country.
    • Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made
  • The Tequila Journey
    • 1800- Tequila is aged in wood for the first time-
    • 1873 Tequila is first shipped to El PaseoTexas
    • 1880- Rapid growth of the No.American railroad system helps spread Tequila to other cities
    • 1900 Mexican President Porfirio Diaz helped the tequila business by pushing for modernization in the country.
    • Upgrades were made to the industry and better tequila was made
    • 1902 –Blue agave name was changed to Agave tequila Weber azul to honor the German Botanist Dr. Franz Weber
  • The Tequila Journey
    • In 1910, El Centennario was established- the first distillery in the highlands
  • The Tequila Journey
    • In 1910, El Centennario was established- the first distillery in the highlands
    • 1910 Mexican revolution-
  • The Tequila Journey
    • In 1910, El Centennario was established- the first distillery in the highlands
    • 1910 Mexican revolution-
    • 1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world
    • The Tequila Shot was born
  •  
  • Prohibition
    • Another good reason not to piss off a woman
  • The Tequila Journey
      • 1930-1960 Agave Shortage
        • Mixtos were born to help keep up the supply
  • The Café Royal Cocktail Book
    • 1937 the Café Royal Cocktail Book is publish
    • Contains 2 drinks that are very similar to the Margarita
      • Picador and Toreador
  • Tequila Cocktails in Print
    • Picador
    • 1/2 Tequila 1/4 Cointreau 1/4 Lime Juice
    • Toreador
    • 1/2 Tequila
    • 1/4 Apricot Brandy
    • 1/4 Lime Juice
  • Tequila Daisy
    • The Kansas City Star, 15th January 1936
    • "The undertaker tells a joke about St. Anthony between sips of a tequila daisy."
  • Tequila Daisy
    • The Kansas City Star, 15th January 1936.
    • "The undertaker tells a joke about St. Anthony between sips of a tequila daisy."
    • .
    • The Syracuse Herald, 19th August 1936
    • Syracuse's Newest and Refreshing Drink TEQUILA DAISY"
  • Tequila Daisy
    • The Kansas City Star, 15th January 1936.
    • "The undertaker tells a joke about St. Anthony between sips of a tequila daisy."
    • .
    • The Syracuse Herald, 19th August 1936
    • Syracuse's Newest and Refreshing Drink TEQUILA DAISY"
    • Albuquerque Journal, 19th July 1939
    • "Banned also was the sale of hard liquor and mixed drinks in cafes, where only beer and wine may now be obtained in lieu of the ubiquitous tequila daisy..."
  • Tequila Daisy
    • In the 1939 book, Saber-tooth Curriculum, the protagonist is frequently depicted as consuming tequila daisies;
    • Within the pages themselves the cocktail is mentioned 5 Times but with no mention of the recipe.
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico
    • 1935 - "Willie," the bartender at Las Don Repulicas in Matamoros, Mexico created the drink for Marguerite Hemery, a friend of the restaurant's owner.
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1930s - Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana and Bertita's bar in Tasca, Mexico
    • 1935 - "Willie," the bartender at Las Don Repulicas in Matamoros, Mexico created the drink for Marguerite.
    • 1936 - Danny Negrete at the bar of the Hotel Garci-Crespo in Puebla, Mexico
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant.
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant.
    • 1940s - Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed to have invented the margarita in honor of Rita Hayworth
        • 1940: WW2 shortage of European goods
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1936-37 - Johnny Durlesser, head barman at McHenry’s Tail o’ the Cock Restaurant.
    • 1940s - Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed to have invented the margarita in honor of Rita Hayworth
    • 1942, July 4th - Francisco "Pancho" Morales at Tommy's Place in Juarez, Mexico .
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria- Marjorie King
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria- Marjorie King
    • 1947 - Al Hernandez and Morris Locke, La Plaza Restaurant in La Jolla, California.
  • Margarita Legends
    • 1947-48 - Carlos "Danny" Herrera, owner of Rancho La Gloria- Marjorie King
    • 1947 - Al Hernandez and Morris Locke, La Plaza Restaurant in La Jolla, California.
    • 1949 Dona Bertha owned a popular cantina in Mexico created “The Bertha
  • Margarita Legends
    • Esquire Magazine: December 1953 issue
      • Margarita Cocktail is mentioned as the “Drink of the Month”
  • Margarita Legends
    • Esquire Magazine: December 1953 issue
      • Margarita Cocktail is mentioned as the “Drink of the Month”
    • "She's from Mexico, Senores, and her name is the Margarita Cocktail--and she is
    • lovely to look at, exciting and provocative."
  • Margarita Legends
    • Esquire Magazine: December 1953 issue
      • Margarita Cocktail is mentioned as the “Drink of the Month”
    • "She's from Mexico, Senores, and her name is the Margarita Cocktail--and she is
    • lovely to look at, exciting and provocative."
    • 1 ounce tequila Dash of Triple Sec Juice of 1/2 lime or lemon
    • Pour over crushed ice, stir. Rub the rim of a stem glass with rind of lemon or
    • lime, spin in salt--pour, and sip."
  •  
  •  
  • The Tequila Journey
      • 1968: Olympic Games in Mexico bring international exposure to Tequila
  • Chinaco
    • 1983 The first ultra premium on the shelves
    • The market for upscale tequila in North American is established
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
      • 1993 The first tequila bars are opened
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
      • 1993 The first tequila bars are opened
      • 1994 - Cheap knock offs are eliminated from the marketplace. Brands return to making 100% blue agave.
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
      • 1993 The first tequila bars are opened
      • 1994 - Cheap knock offs are eliminated from the marketplace. Brands return to making 100% blue agave.
      • 1996: Tequila is recognized by the world as the official spirit of Mexico
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
      • 1993 The first tequila bars are opened
      • 1994 - Cheap knock offs are eliminated from the marketplace. Brands return to making 100% blue agave.
      • 1996: Tequila is recognized by the world as the official spirit of Mexico
      • 1999 Agave shortage: Agave price jumped from $50 a ton in 1999 to $1,500 a ton in 2001
  • Agave Shortage
      • 1989 Patron tequila is launched in the USA
      • 1993 The first tequila bars are opened
      • 1994 - Cheap knock offs are eliminated from the marketplace. Brands return to making 100% blue agave.
      • 1996: Tequila is recognized by the world as the official spirit of Mexico
      • 1999 Agave shortage: Agave price jumped from $50 a ton in 1999 to $1,500 a ton in 2001
      • 2001: Tequila prices hit an all time high
      • 2006: Agave excess- price $25 per ton
  • Today they are 110 producers of Tequila and over 1,000 brands
  • La Paloma La Paloma 2 oz. reposado tequila 1 oz. simple syrup .5 oz. lime juice 1.5 oz. fresh pink grapefruit juice 3 dashes of grapefruit bitters Top with soda Glass: highball rimmed with sea salt Garnish: lime wedge and straw
  • The Making of Tequila
  • Tequila Territory
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
            • Lowland Territory: southwest of Guadalajara, it includes Jalisco, Guanajuato, Nayarit, Michoacán
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
            • Lowland Territory: southwest of Guadalajara, it includes Jalisco, Guanajuato, Nayarit, Michoacán
            • Lowlands- Volcanic rich soil produces more traditional tasting agave plants that are more herbaceous and spicier
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
            • Lowland Territory: southwest of Guadalajara, it includes Jalisco, Guanajuato, Nayarit, Michoacán
            • Lowlands- Volcanic rich soil produces more traditional tasting agave plants that are more herbaceous and spicier
            • Brands: Cabo Wabo,Casa Noble, Don Eguardo,El Jimado, Herradura, Jose Cuervo, Partida, Suaza, Tezon
            • Guanajuato: Corralejo
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
    • Highland Territory : Arandes- Los Altos the highlands of Jalisco
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
    • Highland Territory : Arandes- Los Altos the highlands of Jalisco
    • Agave: The red soil is rich in iron producing sweeter, juicer agaves.
  • Lowlands vs Highlands
    • Highland Territory : Arandes- Los Altos the highlands of Jalisco
    • Agave: The red soil is rich in iron producing sweeter, juicer agaves.
    • Brands: Cazadores, Corazon, Corzo, Don Julio, Gran Centenario, Milagro, Oro Azul, El Tesoro, Patron, Ocho
    • Costal Region: Tamalipas
    • Brand: Chinaco
  • Agave-Step One Harvesting Jimadors: Agave Harvesters Mature Agave: Cutting the leaves vs non cutting of the leaves
  • Trimming the Agave
    • The removal of the penca’s are done with a tool called a Coa.
    • A Jimador will trim up to 100 agaves a day
  • Harvesting the Agave
    • Pinas- Spanish for pineapple
    • Trimmed agaves weigh from 60-120lbs
    • Trimmed agaves are loaded on to a donkey who transfers them to a truck
  • STEP 2 ROASTING
      • Quality Control Check
        • Good distilleries identify 5-10 agaves at random, distill them and test them to make sure they hold up their standards.
  • STEP 2 ROASTING
      • Quality Control Check
        • Good distilleries identify 5-10 agaves at random, distill them and test them to make sure they hold up their standards.
        • Once approved Pinas are cut and then packed in ovens which are heated to 140 degrees to steam the pina’s-
  • STEP 2 ROASTING
      • Quality Control Check
        • Good distilleries identify 5-10 agaves at random, distill them and test them to make sure they hold up their standards.
        • Once approved Pinas are cut and then packed in ovens which are heated to 140 degrees to steam the pina’s-
        • Traditionalist used masonry ovens to slowly cook the agaves takes 24-48hrs.
        • New technology- Autoclave take 7hrs.
        • The steam causes the pina to release it’s honey water which is collected
  • AGAVE STEP 3-MILLING
    • Milling: The remaining fibers are then placed in a mill where the remaining juice is squeeze out of them.
  • STEP 4-FERMENTATION
    • Fermentation: Converting the sugar into alcohol
      • 100 blue agave tequila- yeast is added to Agua Miel
      • Mixto- Other sugars are added and then yeast
  • STEP 5-DISTILLATION
      • Distillation:
      • copper pot stills
      • 2x
      • Head, Heart and Tails
  • STEP 6-AGING
    • Blanco : By law must be bottled within 59 days
  • STEP 6-AGING
    • Blanco : By law must be bottled within 59 days
    • Reposado: By law must be aged a minimum of 2mos to a year
  • STEP 6-AGING
    • Blanco : By law must be bottled within 59 days
    • Reposado: By law must be aged a minimum of 2mos to a year
    • Anejo: By law must be aged a minimum of 12mos to 3years
  • STEP 6-AGING
    • Blanco : By law must be bottled within 59 days
    • Reposado: By law must be aged a minimum of 2mos to a year
    • Anejo: By law must be aged a minimum of 12mos to 3years
    • Extra old Anejo : By law must be aged a minimum of 3yrs and above
  • Tequila Styles
      • Mixto- minimum of 51% blue agave plus other sugars
      • 2 nd Joven Tequila: Young tequila blended with older or sweetened with caramel for taste
      • 3 rd 100% Blue Agave Tequila - Aged Tequilas
  • Don Julio
        • Established in 1942
        • Considered the Ultra Premium tequila of Mexico
        • Prize gift at weddings
  • Don Julio
        • Don Julio quality control
          • Private Distillery
          • Estate grown agave –pick only when fully mature
  • Don Julio
          • Quality control check- distill a small batch
          • Removal of the male and female organ
  • Don Julio
      • Agaves slowly roasted in adobe over for 24hrs
  • Don Julio
      • Agaves slowly roasted in adobe over for 24hrs
      • Fermentation-cultivated agave yeast strain
  • Don Julio
      • Agaves slowly roasted in adobe over for 24hrs
      • Fermentation-cultivated agave yeast strain
      • Long fermentation of up to 72hrs
  • Don Julio
      • Agaves slowly roasted in adobe over for 24hrs
      • Fermentation-cultivated agave yeast strain
      • Long fermentation of up to 72hrs
      • Double Distillation in copper stills
  • Don Julio Blanco
    • Nose:
    • Wood-none
    • Spice- slight black pepper
    • Fruits-hints of citrus, lemon and lime
    • Agave character- clean and bright agave notes, consistent with a well distilled highland agave
    • Taste:
    • Spice- touch of black pepper
    • Fruits- Lemon/lime in the finish
    • Finish – medium to short
    • Mouth feel – Clean and dry
  • Don Julio Varietals
      • Blanco
      • Unaged
      • Taste: lightly sweet with hints of citrus, with a touch of black pepper
      • Reposado “rested”
      • Aged 8months
      • The No. 1 Ultra Premium Reposado in Mexico
      • Taste: Smooth and light with hints of wood and dark chocolate
      • Anejo
      • Aged 18 months
      • Taste: clean and dry with citrus, honey, spice
      • Best served neat or in a rocks glass
      • 1942
      • Anejo – aged between 2 ½ years to 3yrs
      • Distilled in small batches- only 3 barrels a day
      • Aging process monitored exclusively by the master distiller
      • Taste: beautiful, long sweet agave with hints of vanilla
      • Real
      • Extra-Anejo Tequila, aged 3.5-5yrs
      • Taste: Notes of Carmel, chocolate and coffee
  • Jose Cuervo
    • The distillery is centered in the town of Tequila located in Jalisco the lowlands of Mexico
  • Jose Cuervo
    • The name of the distillery is La RoJena
      • It is stilled owned and operated by a descendant of the Cuervo family
  • Jose Cuervo
    • The agave fields are owned and cultivated by the Cuervo distillery
      • Trimming of the penca’s
  • Jose Cuervo
      • Agaves are roasted in autoclave ovens
      • Double distilled in traditional copper pot stills
      • Aged in used whisky barrels
  • Jose Cuervo
      • The Brands of Jose Cuervo
      • Mixto’s:
        • Silver
        • Gold
        • Black
      • 100% Blue Agave Tequila:
        • Traditional
        • Platino
        • Reserve De Familia
        • New Release: 250 th Anniversary bottle
  • Jose Cuervo Platino
    • Launched in September 2007
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is handcrafted in individually numbered bottles and presented in a beautiful wood display box.
  • Jose Cuervo Platino
    • Launched in September 2007
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is handcrafted in individually numbered bottles and presented in a beautiful wood display box.
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is made with hand-selected, estate grown 100% blue agave using the most flavorful inner portion of the agave’s piña, further enhancing its distinct agave taste.
  • Jose Cuervo Platino
    • Launched in September 2007
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is handcrafted in individually numbered bottles and presented in a beautiful wood display box.
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is made with hand-selected, estate grown 100% blue agave using the most flavorful inner portion of the agave’s piña, further enhancing its distinct agave taste.
    • This 100% blue agave Tequila is made from a unique, proprietary method called
      • “ Esencia de Agave” –
  • Jose Cuervo Platino
    • Launched in September 2007
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is handcrafted in individually numbered bottles and presented in a beautiful wood display box.
    • Jose Cuervo Platino is made with hand-selected, estate grown 100% blue agave using the most flavorful inner portion of the agave’s piña, further enhancing its distinct agave taste.
    • This 100% blue agave Tequila is made from a unique, proprietary method called
    • “ Esencia de Agave” –
    • Beverage Testing Institute awarded Jose Cuervo Platino a 96 point rating , the highest ever earned by a silver tequila
  • Jose Cuervo Platino
    • Nose:
    • Wood-Slight vanilla nose
    • Spice- slight clove and anise
    • Fruits-Stone fruit like Apricot, and an orange note tropical fruit: passion fruit
    • Agave character- strong agave notes and an earthy mineral note; there is a mellow, warm character in the nose consistent with the mature lowland agave.
    • Taste:
    • Spice- clove, white pepper and slight cinnamon notes
    • Fruits- orange in the finish
    • Other flavors-green avocado and green pepper, good acidity
    • Finish – medium to short
    • Mouth feel – soft, clean, with no unpleasant heat or bitterness
    • Conclusion:
    • “ This is product will show well in a blind tasting one on one with Patron Platinum… It is an elegant product that shows very well…a crowd pleaser.” – Dale DeGroff
  • EXCELLIA
    • Distillery is located in La Altena distillery in Arandas
  • EXCELLIA
    • Distillery is located in La Altena distillery in Arandas
    • They used 100% 12 year old agaves
  • EXCELLIA
    • Distillery is located in La Altena distillery in Arandas
    • They used 100% 12 year old agaves
    • Roasted in adobe ovens
  • EXCELLIA
    • Distillery is located in La Altena distillery in Arandas
    • They used 100% 12 year old agaves
    • Roasted in adobe ovens
    • Traditional Tahonas
  • EXCELLIA
    • Fermented in wooden vats for 7 to 10 days
    • Double distilled
  • EXCELLIA
    • The tequila is aged in Grand Cru Sauternes wine cask from France, as well as those that formerly held cognac.
  • EXCELLIA
    • Blanco: Only aged for a few weeks in Cognac and Sauternes cask
    • Reposado : is a blend of both these cask, aged 8 months
    • Anejo: aged for 16 months
    • .
  • Sangrita
    • Sangrita = Little Blood
    • Origins date back to 1920’s in Guadalajara.
    • originated from the leftover juices (mainly orange) of an equally popular regional fruit salad “Pico De Gallo” covered with fine chili powder.
  • Sangrita
    • Pico De Gallo: consumed from a large bowl during breakfast
    • the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup
    • precursor of the tequila shot glass.
    • Late 1990’s its popularity began to expand pass its borders
  • Sangrita
    • 3/4 cup tomato sauce
    • ½ cup of orange juice
    • 3 tablespoons of fresh lime juice
    • ¼ teaspoon of onion powder
    • ¼ teaspoon of salt
    • ½ teaspoon of sugar
    • ½ teaspoon of chile powder
    • 1 tablespoon of hot sauce
    • Combine all the ingredients in a pitcher, chill in the fridge before serving.
    • Served alongside a shot of Tequila (Blanco or Reposado)
  • Seite Leguas
    • Based in Atotonilco El Alto, Jalisco since 1952
    • Seite Leguas (7 Leagues) The favorite horse of General Pancho Villa
  • Seite Leguas
    • Agaves harvested at their peak
    • Tested for sugar levels
    • Roasted slowly and carefully monitored in adobe ovens
  • Seite Leguas
    • Old School Tahonas driving by a mule
    • Fermented in steel vats
    • Distilled in Copper pot stills
    • Age in temperature controlled warehouses
  • Seite Leguas
    • Blanco- un aged crisp silver tequila
    • Reposado- aged 8 months
    • Anejo - Aged 24 months, rich agave flavors mingled with oak
    • Extra Anejo: aged 5yrs in new white oak barrels
  • Smoke and Ginger
    • Smoke and Ginger
    • 1.5 OZ Blanco Tequila
    • .5 OZ Mezcal
    • .75 oz. Honey and ginger syrup
    • .75 OZ Fresh lime juice
    • Served over ice in a rocks glass
  • Oaxaca
  • Mezcal vs Tequila
  •