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Global drinking rituals

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A presentation about the history of social drinking, people's need to bond and the drinking rituals they have created to help them celebrate life, work, death and just being able to get together

A presentation about the history of social drinking, people's need to bond and the drinking rituals they have created to help them celebrate life, work, death and just being able to get together

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  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • FernetBrancaIn 1845 in Milan, Bernardino Branca and his three sons Luigi, Giuseppe and Stefano, created FBFernet-Branca, is first and foremost an amaro, made with all natural ingredients. It still is made according to the original, secret recipe, with more than 14 herbs (among which Saffron one of the most expensive herbs in the world, rhubarb, aloe and gentian root) macerated for one year in oak barrels. By accounting for an estimated 75 percent of the world's saffron consumption, the Branca family essentially controls the market price of the spice -- which at about $900 The wonderful things rumored to be in the liqueur include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, rhubarb, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oilThe first adverts in local political papers boasted of a "febrifuge, vermifuge, tonic, anti-choleric, warming pick-me-up" that could be mixed with everything from vermouth to animal broth. Scala wisely marketed it to women to ease menstrual discomfort (until 1913, only women were depicted drinking it in advertisements), but it was also lauded to aid digestion, impede nervous irritation, stimulate the appetite, treat troubles of the "splean," cure anxiety, quell stomach aches and headaches, and arrest the effects of old age.With healthy dose of marketing BS rumours spread that Fernet could cure anything from Mentrseaul cramps, cure Cholorea, quite a screaming baby, arresting the effect of old ageFerneducator: One who teaches others about Fernet-Branca.
  • The drink came to the United States in the suitcases of Italian immigrants, finding a home in the Italian wards of San Francisco, New York City etcWhen Prohibition laws were passed in the U.S. in 1919, the myth of Fernet-Branca was a salvation: Imported as a medicine, it was perhaps the only package liquor legally sold in the States. A year before the 18th Amendment was repealed, the demand for Fernet-Branca was so great that the Branca family, then in its fourth generation of ownership, opened an American distillery in New York City's Tribeca. The paperwork of the distillery lists deliveries to more than 40 San Francisco drugstores, most of which were in North Beach.Reform Act of 1978, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms took a more investigative sip of the drink and tightened controls forcing bring opiates down to legal levels.Today Fernet-Branca is 80 proof, with only trace amounts of opiates. Bottles of the earlier opiate-rich brew are rare and can be identified by true Fernet-Branca scholars upon a close examination of the label
  • The myth of Fernet Brand written in the San Francisco Chronical 2005Why did Fernet become a cult classic: its obscure, it is strong, it is bitter and it has authentic Roots. Fernetwas spread by bartenders and servers to the customers in the city's foodie set. Fernet-Branca found the route to San Francisco's heart through its stomach.In a city that prides itself on food, independence, and sophistication, and certainly the need for a hangover cure, Fernet-Branca offered a perfect fit for San Francisco's character.In San Francisco, consumes 50% of the product imported into the US . The preferred shot in sf is FB and a small glass of ginger all.From its deep roots in the Italian-American community, the gospel ofThe cautious marketing of Cattani and her partner Licu doesn't hurt either.
  • These kegs of the bitter liqueur--are not chilled like beer.Instead, they're pumped with nitrogen right into your glass. Bartenders say it tastes the same as, if not better than, the stuff in the bottle, due to the slight aeration of the Fernet-Branca.The first place to launch the trend was Bullitt, a bar-restaurant and now Tonic, two blocks north of Bullitt (and from the same owners), also keeps Fernet on tapAround 35 percent of America's Fernet-Branca supply is consumed in San Francisco, so it's logical that if a bulk breakthrough were to happen anywhere, it would be here.Boston: it is called the Jagermeister for Hipters, enjoyed thoroughly as a Hanky Pank and as shot- Also on tap at the Citizen Public HouseNyEmployersOnly, created the Fernando, a shaken cocktail with Fernet-Branca, white vermouth and Galliano liqueur: absolutely phenomenal.
  • One hour before last call, we call together all the on-duty FOH staff for a toast and shot.  We've served so many drinks to to others by that point, and endured enough abuse, that it's that one restorative moment as a team that propels us to the finish line. The shot is usually overproof whiskey, but there's frequently a call for agave distillates (seeing as how they're Red Bull for grownups).  The crowd reaction usually ranges from somewhat mystified ("What was that?") to jealous ("Where's mine?!") to gleeful ("You look like you needed that one!").  Good times all around. 
  • At 1 AM when we are finished serving drinks for the night John Gertsen(or whoever the manager on duty is that evening) will take a Reading Lager out for every staff member, write our name on it and distribute them to us with a toast to mark the successful completion of a  night of service.  We don't do the normal last call really so it's a way to let us know that we are done serving and also reward us.  If we have fellow bartenders visiting us that night from other establishments they are included in the ritual as part of our family.   In addition we have a few drink rituals associated with specific nights.  Gertsen'sfavorite cocktail is the Sazerac and so we have Sazerac Sundays.  Right before midnight during Sunday night's service John will come out and make a round of Sazeracs for the staff.  It's our way of toasting the passing of the weekend which, as you know, is great but physically demanding.  If fellow bartenders are in the house they once again are included as well (some of the PDT kids got to participate about a month or so ago).  On Monday nights just past midnight we usher in Tuesday with a round of Ti Punches.   
  • Well in our house we all do "staff meal" at The Varnish right as the doors open.  Usually rye whiskey...all staff working gets a shot and toasts and if a customer happens to walk in right as the door opens we pour a shot for them and include them in our staff meal...Hospitality and community baby...
  • Rye whiskey is pretty much the king of shift shots in Seattle, we all turn to our cheap 'ol bottle of Old Overholt to get our fix. We didn't have many specific rituals, typically at some point in the evening, someone needed a shot, so we all took one. That was the only rule, if one person had a shot, we did it as a family. "Safety meetings" also took immediate priority. Unless you were actually talking to a guest, you dropped what you were doing to sneak behind the bar and attend the meeting. There were no toasts, except possibly a toast to that day of the week, or to whiskey itself, we just take it quick and get back to work. Most drinking rituals have to be kept fairly secret in Washington (and Oregon as well), because drinking behind the bar is a huge illegal no no. It doesn't really stop anyone though, we just keep it under wraps.
  • There was something we started at New Year's Eve that has sort of caught on among our guest bartenders. Now usually we don't do drop shots or the like but with staff its a little bit different.  Because we have one of the largest selections of Amaros in Canada plus for NYE we did A Campari Red Party, it was a big night and I think it was about 3am in the morning and we were all shagged. Nate created this with the last of the Red Bull we had to keep the staff going all night. It's called the Milano Drop Shot
  • Huns would enter a city, drink them dry of their wine and kill everyone. Once the wine and food was gone they left because they did not like civilian life. They perferred to drink wine but if it was not available they drank KumisKumis is a rare example of alchoho obtained from animal, as opposed to vegetable sources. It was week around 2 % abv.
  • ancient Greece. In a time when poison was a murder weapon of choice, the toast was designed to put guests at ease by pouring all drinks from the same communal container, and clinking glasses to spill the contents from one glass to another. This would assure everyone that the wine wasn't poisoned, and that they were among friends.The Norse had a particularly morbid custom of using the skull of a fallen enemy for the drinking glass, which has led to a term for a modern-day toast: skoal.Christians. The clinking noise was supposed to be reminiscent of bells, and therefore would drive away the devilVikings, when, during gatherings and celebrations, they would raise a drink to the warriors and friends they had lost. The Mongols had a similar tradition.
  • ancient Greece. In a time when poison was a murder weapon of choice, the toast was designed to put guests at ease by pouring all drinks from the same communal container, and clinking glasses to spill the contents from one glass to another. This would assure everyone that the wine wasn't poisoned, and that they were among friends.The Norse had a particularly morbid custom of using the skull of a fallen enemy for the drinking glass, which has led to a term for a modern-day toast: skoal.Christians. The clinking noise was supposed to be reminiscent of bells, and therefore would drive away the devilVikings, when, during gatherings and celebrations, they would raise a drink to the warriors and friends they had lost. The Mongols had a similar tradition.
  • ancient Greece. In a time when poison was a murder weapon of choice, the toast was designed to put guests at ease by pouring all drinks from the same communal container, and clinking glasses to spill the contents from one glass to another. This would assure everyone that the wine wasn't poisoned, and that they were among friends.The Norse had a particularly morbid custom of using the skull of a fallen enemy for the drinking glass, which has led to a term for a modern-day toast: skoal.Christians. The clinking noise was supposed to be reminiscent of bells, and therefore would drive away the devilVikings, when, during gatherings and celebrations, they would raise a drink to the warriors and friends they had lost. The Mongols had a similar tradition.
  • ancient Greece. In a time when poison was a murder weapon of choice, the toast was designed to put guests at ease by pouring all drinks from the same communal container, and clinking glasses to spill the contents from one glass to another. This would assure everyone that the wine wasn't poisoned, and that they were among friends.The Norse had a particularly morbid custom of using the skull of a fallen enemy for the drinking glass, which has led to a term for a modern-day toast: skoal.Christians. The clinking noise was supposed to be reminiscent of bells, and therefore would drive away the devilVikings, when, during gatherings and celebrations, they would raise a drink to the warriors and friends they had lost. The Mongols had a similar tradition.
  • From what I’ve heard and read it all began with the Vikings who would heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye. The theory positing that if any man had poisoned the drink, the tainted libation would spill into all cups and hence off them all. It is supposed that the looking in the eye would further the honorable intention that no, I did not drop poison in your cup. It appears that in some cultures (non-American) touching glasses requires eye contact. If eye contact is not established at the time of touching glasses, the two participants are said to have seven years bad luck (or in some cases, bad “intimate relations”).
  • From what I’ve heard and read it all began with the Vikings who would heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye. The theory positing that if any man had poisoned the drink, the tainted libation would spill into all cups and hence off them all. It is supposed that the looking in the eye would further the honorable intention that no, I did not drop poison in your cup. It appears that in some cultures (non-American) touching glasses requires eye contact. If eye contact is not established at the time of touching glasses, the two participants are said to have seven years bad luck (or in some cases, bad “intimate relations”).
  • From what I’ve heard and read it all began with the Vikings who would heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye. The theory positing that if any man had poisoned the drink, the tainted libation would spill into all cups and hence off them all. It is supposed that the looking in the eye would further the honorable intention that no, I did not drop poison in your cup. It appears that in some cultures (non-American) touching glasses requires eye contact. If eye contact is not established at the time of touching glasses, the two participants are said to have seven years bad luck (or in some cases, bad “intimate relations”).
  • However odd the notion of holding a glass of wine or beer in the air and saying “Cheers!”, I’d never given the matter any thought until I lived in France and realized how complicated the procedure could be.In France, The Rules Are ComplicatedIn France, saying cheers is not enough (well, it’s santé for a start, which means health rather than happiness.) No, you must maintain eye contact, you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group and you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.“Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • However odd the notion of holding a glass of wine or beer in the air and saying “Cheers!”, I’d never given the matter any thought until I lived in France and realized how complicated the procedure could be.In France, The Rules Are ComplicatedIn France, saying cheers is not enough (well, it’s santé for a start, which means health rather than happiness.) No, you must maintain eye contact, you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group and you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.“Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • However odd the notion of holding a glass of wine or beer in the air and saying “Cheers!”, I’d never given the matter any thought until I lived in France and realized how complicated the procedure could be.In France, The Rules Are ComplicatedIn France, saying cheers is not enough (well, it’s santé for a start, which means health rather than happiness.) No, you must maintain eye contact, you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group and you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.“Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • However odd the notion of holding a glass of wine or beer in the air and saying “Cheers!”, I’d never given the matter any thought until I lived in France and realized how complicated the procedure could be.In France, The Rules Are ComplicatedIn France, saying cheers is not enough (well, it’s santé for a start, which means health rather than happiness.) No, you must maintain eye contact, you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group and you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.“Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • However odd the notion of holding a glass of wine or beer in the air and saying “Cheers!”, I’d never given the matter any thought until I lived in France and realized how complicated the procedure could be.In France, The Rules Are ComplicatedIn France, saying cheers is not enough (well, it’s santé for a start, which means health rather than happiness.) No, you must maintain eye contact, you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group and you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.“Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • Russian begans the tradition a long time ago, by drinking shots of vodka and drinking or eating pickelsUSA:The rumor is that it started with Truck drivers in Texas who drank pickel juice with their drinks so they would not have to pee a lot while on the road.This some how spread to a country club in Westchester and then came to NY where TJ Lynch and Toby made it famous. It Started as house shot for the staff, they would drink it before there shift and share some with the regulars but it became so poplular they had to put it on the menu. Increasingly around the country, bartenders are hearing the slightly odd question, “May I have a Pickleback?” The Pickleback is a two shot drink, thought to have originated in hipster bars in Brooklyn, but no one knows the exact origins of this drink. What is known is that the Pickle Back has become one of the hottest drinks in the country. Simply one shot of Bulleit Rye or whisky o f your choiceanda second shot of pickle juice, first you take the Jameson’s, folowed by the pickle juice. This drink is both surprising and tasty. Some cutting edge bars have begun to create their own signature pickle juice to pair with Jameson’s. Portland bartender Jacob Grier offers up pickled nectarine juice as his accompaniment, while NYC bartender TJ Lynch of the Breslin uses a pickle juice prepared by Quino Baca, co-owner of Momofuku.
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restauranteur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink, but remains virtually unknown outside Canada. It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annuallyChell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghettiallevongole, spaghetti with tomato sauce and clamsChell said the drink was an immediate hit with the restaurant's patrons, claiming it "took off like a rocket".[4] Within five years of its introduction, the Caesar had become Calgary's most popular mixed drink.[5] It spread throughout Western Canada, then to the east.[4] Coinciding with its 40th anniversary, a petition was launched in 2009 in the hopes of having the Caesar named the nation's official mixed drink.[6] In Calgary, Mayor Dave Bronconnier celebrated the drink's anniversary by declaring May 13, 2009 as Caesar Day in the city.The Mott's company was independently developing Clamato, a mixture of clam and toma.to juices, at the same time the Caesar was inventedMotts claims that the Caesar is the most popular mixed drink in Canada, estimating that over 350 million Caesars are consumed every year.[9]Outside of Canada, the Caesar is virtually unknown. In the United States, it is typically only available at bars along the Canadian border
  • Toe#1 was that of Louie Liken, trapper placer miner, and in the 1920’s, rum runner. Lousi and his brother Otto would cross the border to the united states in a blizzard by a dog team to deliver their alchoholic cargo. During one such outing, Louie stepped into overflow and got his foot wet. Fearing that the Northwest Mounted Police were on their trail they had to cintue their trip. As a result of extended exposure to the cold, Louis big toe froze. To prevent the onst of gangrened it was necessary to amputate. Lacking faith in Doctors and with no desired to travel the 60 miles to get to one they decide d to take care of the situaltion on their own. So he consumed large quantities of 180% overproof rum and sufficiently drunk his brother cut his toe with an axe. To remember the night they pickeled the toe in a jar of alchohol. Years later, when cleaning the brothers cabin, the toe was discoved by Captain Dick Stevenson, After conferring with his friends they decided on rules for the sour to club and started serving it at the Elderoado Hotel in 1973. In July 1980, a placer miner named Garry Younger was trying for the Sourtoe record. On his thirteenth glass of Sourtoe champagne, his chair tipped backward and he swalled the toe. Never to be recovered.
  • Toe#1 was that of Louie Liken, trapper placer miner, and in the 1920’s, rum runner. Lousi and his brother Otto would cross the border to the united states in a blizzard by a dog team to deliver their alchoholic cargo. During one such outing, Louie stepped into overflow and got his foot wet. Fearing that the Northwest Mounted Police were on their trail they had to cintue their trip. As a result of extended exposure to the cold, Louis big toe froze. To prevent the onst of gangrened it was necessary to amputate. Lacking faith in Doctors and with no desired to travel the 60 miles to get to one they decide d to take care of the situaltion on their own. So he consumed large quantities of 180% overproof rum and sufficiently drunk his brother cut his toe with an axe. To remember the night they pickeled the toe in a jar of alchohol. Years later, when cleaning the brothers cabin, the toe was discoved by Captain Dick Stevenson, After conferring with his friends they decided on rules for the sour to club and started serving it at the Elderoado Hotel in 1973. In July 1980, a placer miner named Garry Younger was trying for the Sourtoe record. On his thirteenth glass of Sourtoe champagne, his chair tipped backward and he swalled the toe. Never to be recovered.
  • Toe#1 was that of Louie Liken, trapper placer miner, and in the 1920’s, rum runner. Lousi and his brother Otto would cross the border to the united states in a blizzard by a dog team to deliver their alchoholic cargo. During one such outing, Louie stepped into overflow and got his foot wet. Fearing that the Northwest Mounted Police were on their trail they had to cintue their trip. As a result of extended exposure to the cold, Louis big toe froze. To prevent the onst of gangrened it was necessary to amputate. Lacking faith in Doctors and with no desired to travel the 60 miles to get to one they decide d to take care of the situaltion on their own. So he consumed large quantities of 180% overproof rum and sufficiently drunk his brother cut his toe with an axe. To remember the night they pickeled the toe in a jar of alchohol. Years later, when cleaning the brothers cabin, the toe was discoved by Captain Dick Stevenson, After conferring with his friends they decided on rules for the sour to club and started serving it at the Elderoado Hotel in 1973. In July 1980, a placer miner named Garry Younger was trying for the Sourtoe record. On his thirteenth glass of Sourtoe champagne, his chair tipped backward and he swalled the toe. Never to be recovered.
  • Toe#1 was that of Louie Liken, trapper placer miner, and in the 1920’s, rum runner. Lousi and his brother Otto would cross the border to the united states in a blizzard by a dog team to deliver their alchoholic cargo. During one such outing, Louie stepped into overflow and got his foot wet. Fearing that the Northwest Mounted Police were on their trail they had to cintue their trip. As a result of extended exposure to the cold, Louis big toe froze. To prevent the onst of gangrened it was necessary to amputate. Lacking faith in Doctors and with no desired to travel the 60 miles to get to one they decide d to take care of the situaltion on their own. So he consumed large quantities of 180% overproof rum and sufficiently drunk his brother cut his toe with an axe. To remember the night they pickeled the toe in a jar of alchohol. Years later, when cleaning the brothers cabin, the toe was discoved by Captain Dick Stevenson, After conferring with his friends they decided on rules for the sour to club and started serving it at the Elderoado Hotel in 1973. In July 1980, a placer miner named Garry Younger was trying for the Sourtoe record. On his thirteenth glass of Sourtoe champagne, his chair tipped backward and he swalled the toe. Never to be recovered.
  • Established in 1973, the Sourtoe Cocktail has become a Dawson City tradition. The original rules were that the toe must be placed in a beer glass full of champagne, and that the toe must touch the drinker's lips during the consumtion of the alcohol before he or she can claim to be a true Sourtoer. The rules have changed in the past twenty-seven years. The Sourtoe can be had with any drink now (even ones that aren't alcoholic), but one rule remains the same. The drinker's lips must touch the toe. " You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow-- But the lips have gotta touch the toe." The Sourtoes are actual human toes that have been dehydrated and preserved in salt. Swallowing one is not suggested.
  • Established in 1973, the Sourtoe Cocktail has become a Dawson City tradition. The original rules were that the toe must be placed in a beer glass full of champagne, and that the toe must touch the drinker's lips during the consumtion of the alcohol before he or she can claim to be a true Sourtoer. The rules have changed in the past twenty-seven years. The Sourtoe can be had with any drink now (even ones that aren't alcoholic), but one rule remains the same. The drinker's lips must touch the toe. " You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow-- But the lips have gotta touch the toe." The Sourtoes are actual human toes that have been dehydrated and preserved in salt. Swallowing one is not suggested.
  • Established in 1973, the Sourtoe Cocktail has become a Dawson City tradition. The original rules were that the toe must be placed in a beer glass full of champagne, and that the toe must touch the drinker's lips during the consumtion of the alcohol before he or she can claim to be a true Sourtoer. The rules have changed in the past twenty-seven years. The Sourtoe can be had with any drink now (even ones that aren't alcoholic), but one rule remains the same. The drinker's lips must touch the toe. " You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow-- But the lips have gotta touch the toe." The Sourtoes are actual human toes that have been dehydrated and preserved in salt. Swallowing one is not suggested.
  • Established in 1973, the Sourtoe Cocktail has become a Dawson City tradition. The original rules were that the toe must be placed in a beer glass full of champagne, and that the toe must touch the drinker's lips during the consumtion of the alcohol before he or she can claim to be a true Sourtoer. The rules have changed in the past twenty-seven years. The Sourtoe can be had with any drink now (even ones that aren't alcoholic), but one rule remains the same. The drinker's lips must touch the toe. " You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow-- But the lips have gotta touch the toe." The Sourtoes are actual human toes that have been dehydrated and preserved in salt. Swallowing one is not suggested.
  • Cuba- Honoring of the DeadAmerica- pour one for the hommiesBrazil- Cha chacaArgentina- Fernetbranca and cokeVenzuela: El RitualChile: Once (on-say) drinking in the afternoonBrazil produces about 2 billion liters of cachaça annually and exports about 400 million liters, leaving approximately 1.6 billion liters for domestic consumption—about 11 liters (3 gallons more or less) for every man, woman and child in Brazil! razilianscommonly refer to cachaça as pinga. Brazilians who drink cachaça pure, straight and unmixed (pura) will often purposefully spill a few drops for the saints before imbibing. The first shot of any cachaça imbibed straight (pura) is often referred to as the guia (guide) as it is the one that clears the path and leads the way for all the shots that will certainly followboth the names cachaça and caipirinha as strictly Brazilian in origin. Brazil has also sent this issue to the World Trade Organization in the hope that the names cachaça and caipirinha will eventually gain intellectual property rights protection under international law
  • The drink that was used in libations varied; most commonly it was wine or olive oil, and in India, ghee. The vessels used in the ritual, including the patera, often had a significant form which differentiated them from secular vessels. The liquid was poured onto something of religious significance. The libation was very often poured on the ground itself, as an offering to the Earth.n Shinto, the practice of libation and the drink offered is called Miki \\lit. "The Liquor of the Gods". At a ceremony at a Shinto shrine, it is usually done with sake, but at a household shrine, one may substitute fresh water which can be changed every morning. It is served in a white porcelain or metal cup without any decoration.Artemis and Apollo at omphalos (libation)In the Quechua and Aymara cultures of the South American Andes, it is common to pour a small amount of one's beverage on the ground before drinking as an offering to the Pachamama, or Mother EarthIn certain African cultures, the ritual of pouring libation is an essential ceremonial tradition and a way of giving homage to the ancestors. Ancestors are not only respected in such cultures, but also invited to participate in all public functions
  • Gangsters like to drink forties and pay homage to their dead homies by pouring some of the liquor on the ground. Malt liquor has also become a pop culture fixture in the hip-hop comunity. During the 90’s, many rap music videos showed a bunch of people pouring bottles of malt liquor on video hoes or on the graves of dead comrades. Without malt liquor there was no partyThis is referred to as "tipping" to one's (dead) homies (friends),[4] or "pouring one out".[5]This is referenced in various songs, such as the 1993 "Gangsta Lean (This Is For My Homies)" by DRS ("I tip my 40 to your memory"), and sometimes accompanied by ritual expressions such as "One for me, and one for my homies."In Cuba a widespread custom is to spill a drop or two of rum from one's glass while saying "para los santos" (for the Saints
  • El Ritual, as its name suggests, is not about mixing interesting flavours in a glass, but creating an event, performing a set of steps that allow you to mix the raw flavours in your mouth for a full-on explosion of taste bud-tingling tropical nonsense. Quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, Second, you need a few limes cut into wedges.Third, you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.Then all you do is take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.Immediately the bitterness of the coffee and the sweetness of the sugar will fill your mouth and threaten to overwhelm your tastebuds. But don't panic. Help is at hand.Take the glass of rum and have a swig. You don't need to down it one just take enough rum into your mouth to let all the flavours mingle.A second swig from the glass will bring in new flavours, as the rich warm buttery taste of the rum replaces the slight bitterness of the coffee and the shallow sweetness of the sugar.When you've finished just lick your lips, get back in line and have another one.
  • El Ritual, as its name suggests, is not about mixing interesting flavours in a glass, but creating an event, performing a set of steps that allow you to mix the raw flavours in your mouth for a full-on explosion of taste bud-tingling tropical nonsense. Quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, Second, you need a few limes cut into wedges.Third, you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.Then all you do is take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.Immediately the bitterness of the coffee and the sweetness of the sugar will fill your mouth and threaten to overwhelm your tastebuds. But don't panic. Help is at hand.Take the glass of rum and have a swig. You don't need to down it one just take enough rum into your mouth to let all the flavours mingle.A second swig from the glass will bring in new flavours, as the rich warm buttery taste of the rum replaces the slight bitterness of the coffee and the shallow sweetness of the sugar.When you've finished just lick your lips, get back in line and have another one.
  • El Ritual, as its name suggests, is not about mixing interesting flavours in a glass, but creating an event, performing a set of steps that allow you to mix the raw flavours in your mouth for a full-on explosion of taste bud-tingling tropical nonsense. Quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, Second, you need a few limes cut into wedges.Third, you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.Then all you do is take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.Immediately the bitterness of the coffee and the sweetness of the sugar will fill your mouth and threaten to overwhelm your tastebuds. But don't panic. Help is at hand.Take the glass of rum and have a swig. You don't need to down it one just take enough rum into your mouth to let all the flavours mingle.A second swig from the glass will bring in new flavours, as the rich warm buttery taste of the rum replaces the slight bitterness of the coffee and the shallow sweetness of the sugar.When you've finished just lick your lips, get back in line and have another one.
  • El Ritual, as its name suggests, is not about mixing interesting flavours in a glass, but creating an event, performing a set of steps that allow you to mix the raw flavours in your mouth for a full-on explosion of taste bud-tingling tropical nonsense. Quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, Second, you need a few limes cut into wedges.Third, you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.Then all you do is take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.Immediately the bitterness of the coffee and the sweetness of the sugar will fill your mouth and threaten to overwhelm your tastebuds. But don't panic. Help is at hand.Take the glass of rum and have a swig. You don't need to down it one just take enough rum into your mouth to let all the flavours mingle.A second swig from the glass will bring in new flavours, as the rich warm buttery taste of the rum replaces the slight bitterness of the coffee and the shallow sweetness of the sugar.When you've finished just lick your lips, get back in line and have another one.
  • El Ritual, as its name suggests, is not about mixing interesting flavours in a glass, but creating an event, performing a set of steps that allow you to mix the raw flavours in your mouth for a full-on explosion of taste bud-tingling tropical nonsense. Quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, Second, you need a few limes cut into wedges.Third, you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.Then all you do is take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.Immediately the bitterness of the coffee and the sweetness of the sugar will fill your mouth and threaten to overwhelm your tastebuds. But don't panic. Help is at hand.Take the glass of rum and have a swig. You don't need to down it one just take enough rum into your mouth to let all the flavours mingle.A second swig from the glass will bring in new flavours, as the rich warm buttery taste of the rum replaces the slight bitterness of the coffee and the shallow sweetness of the sugar.When you've finished just lick your lips, get back in line and have another one.
  • The word caipirinha means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese. Although there’s no definitive version of how the cocktail was invented, its story is bound up with that of cachaça, the spirit that Brazilians drink a staggering 200 millionlitres of every year. other tropical cocktails are usually made with un-aged cachaça. Until now, the only cachaça available in the US were some of Brazil's most ordinary, which sell for $1-$3 US in Brazil. \\
  • The word caipirinha means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese. Although there’s no definitive version of how the cocktail was invented, its story is bound up with that of cachaça, the spirit that Brazilians drink a staggering 200 millionlitres of every year. other tropical cocktails are usually made with un-aged cachaça. Until now, the only cachaça available in the US were some of Brazil's most ordinary, which sell for $1-$3 US in Brazil. \\HistoryHistory of cachaça goes back to 400 year ago when plantation owners began serving the liquid to their slaves after noticing that the drive would increase vigor. It is commonly known that the spirit was first invented by Portuguese settlers in Brazil. Over the years better distilled cachaças were developed and soon people started to drink it on dinner tables in colonial Brazil.Shortly after slavery was banned in 1888, the monarchy was ousted and progressive leaders decleared Brazil a modern Republic, national proide began to sugar throughout the country.By the 1920s, cachaça had become a symbol of Brazilian identity, produced and consumed throughout the nation by diverse ethic and social groups.
  • The word caipirinha means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese. Although there’s no definitive version of how the cocktail was invented, its story is bound up with that of cachaça, the spirit that Brazilians drink a staggering 200 millionlitres of every year. other tropical cocktails are usually made with un-aged cachaça. Until now, the only cachaça available in the US were some of Brazil's most ordinary, which sell for $1-$3 US in Brazil. \\HistoryHistory of cachaça goes back to 400 year ago when plantation owners began serving the liquid to their slaves after noticing that the drive would increase vigor. It is commonly known that the spirit was first invented by Portuguese settlers in Brazil. Over the years better distilled cachaças were developed and soon people started to drink it on dinner tables in colonial Brazil. Shortly after slavery was banned in 1888, the monarchy was ousted and progressive leaders decleared Brazil a modern Republic, national proide began to sugar throughout the country.By the 1920s, cachaça had become a symbol of Brazilian identity, produced and consumed throughout the nation by diverse ethic and social groups.
  • HistoryHistory of cachaça goes back to 400 year ago when plantation owners began serving the liquid to their slaves after noticing that the drive would increase vigor. It is commonly known that the spirit was first invented by Portuguese settlers in Brazil. Over the years better distilled cachaças were developed and soon people started to drink it on dinner tables in colonial Brazil. Shortly after slavery was banned in 1888, the monarchy was ousted and progressive leaders decleared Brazil a modern Republic, national proide began to sugar throughout the country.By the 1920s, cachaça had become a symbol of Brazilian identity, produced and consumed throughout the nation by diverse ethic and social groups.
  • Argentina, for instance, where every year 1,200,000 cases of Fernet-Branca are shipped, the national beverage is Branca and coke: It is the unofficial nation al drinkThey even have a song: Fernet Con Coca," by Vilma Palma, which spent weeks at the top of Argentine radio charts (a rough translation of the lyrics: "I'm half-crazy, but I don't want to end up in a cell without my Fernet with Coca-Cola")
  • In 1910, El Centennario (makers of today's  Siete Leguas) was founded, the first distillery in the highlands (Los Altos).1910 Mexican revolution- Tequila becomes a symbol of national pride1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world killing over 100 million people. Due to the lack of medicine in Mexico the doctors prescribe Tequila, lime and salt as a treatment against the flu1920: Prohibition occurred in the US and many wealthy people went South of border for libationsJuly 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735. Timmons notes that this phenomenal growth in tourists created the need to build two new international bridges. The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • The paloma (Spanish for "dove") is a tequila-based cocktail, most commonly prepared by mixing tequila with a grapefruit-flavored soda such as Squirt or Jarritos and served on the rocks with a lime wedge. Optionally, the glass may also be rimmed with salt.Alternatively, the grapefruit soda can be replaced with fresh white or red grapefruit juice (jugo de toronja), club soda (sugar optional), and fresh-squeezed lime juice.The paloma is the most popular tequila-based cocktail in Mexico.The drink was invented in the tiny town of Tequila in Jalisco, which sleepily charms with cobblestone streets and distilleries nestled between unassuming houses and shops without signs. The cocktail was created at La Capilla, the oldest bar in town, by Don Javier Delgado Corona, grandson of the bar’s original owner. It’s essentially a tequila highball made with fresh lime, Squirt or whatever grapefruit soda you prefer (or fresh grapefruit and soda if you wanna get all fancy), served with a salted rim. It’s simple, refreshing, and far more popular locally than a Margarita. 
  • a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in tasteWhile most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato.A popular recipe in Guadalajara was said to have originated from the leftover juices (of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin. As the fruit salad, known to Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo, was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate, while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine, cucumber, papaya, mango and jicama.. Sangrita is used in a drink known as "The Mexican Flag", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in tasteWhile most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato.A popular recipe in Guadalajara was said to have originated from the leftover juices (of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin. As the fruit salad, known to Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo, was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate, while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine, cucumber, papaya, mango and jicama.. Sangrita is used in a drink known as "The Mexican Flag", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • Sangrita (meaning “little blood”), whose origin dates back to the 1920s, is a customary partner to a shot of straight tequilablanco; a non-alcoholic accompaniment that highlights tequila's crisp acidity and cleanses the palate between each peppery sip. The basic conception of sangrita is to complement the flavor of 100% agave tequila, which is also peppery and citrusy in taste. Before increased worldwide popularity and corporate interest in tequila in the late 1990s and early 21st century, few outside of the Mexican Pacific region bordering the state of Jalisco, where tequila was mainly produced and consumed, knew of the existence of sangrita, and much less its recipe. As popularity grew, so did commercial efforts to recreate the mysterious red, spicy drink that was served with tequila. In fact the drink was not that mysterious. While most outsiders would reference its red make up as tomato juice and spices, locals and traditionalists agree that the one ingredient that most likely doesn't belong is tomato.A popular recipe in Guadalajara (Jalisco's largest city) was said to have originated from the leftover juices (mainly orange) of an equally popular regional fruit salad covered with fine chili powder, usually piquin. As the fruit salad, known to tapatios (Guadalajara's natives) as pico de gallo, was consumed from a large bowl during breakfast, the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup, which itself would be the precursor of the tequila shot glass. In essence, the recipe of the original sangrita is thought to be that and the same recipe of the fruit salad from which it was strained. In almost all cases the drink took its bright red color from a mix of the fine pepper powder, spices, and pomegranate, while the base was mainly orange or sweetened lime juice. The key to a balanced sangrita recipe can be found in the fruit salad's recipes, which would have included any or all of the following: tangerine, cucumber, papaya, mango and jicama.Traditionally, sangrita is served with tequila blanco, but it can also accompany tequila reposado. The tequila and sangrita are each poured into a separate shot glass (or caballito) and the two are alternately sipped, not chased. Sangrita is used in a drink known as "The Mexican Flag", where three separate double shot glasses are filled with lime juice, tequila and sangrita.
  • In 1910, El Centennario (makers of today's  Siete Leguas) was founded, the first distillery in the highlands (Los Altos).1910 Mexican revolution- Tequila becomes a symbol of national pride1918: The Spanish flu epidemic spreads across the world killing over 100 million people. Due to the lack of medicine in Mexico the doctors prescribe Tequila, lime and salt as a treatment against the flu1920: Prohibition occurred in the US and many wealthy people went South of border for libationsJuly 1918 to July 1919, only 14,130 tourists crossed the border into Mexico. Within a year, that number had risen to 418,735. Timmons notes that this phenomenal growth in tourists created the need to build two new international bridges. The town El Paseo, Juarez
  • Passing the Port The most widely known tradition is believed to come from British naval customs for serving the wine. The decanter of port is placed in front of the host who then serves the guest to his right, then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side). The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.If the Port doesn't come backIf the decanter does not come full circle back to the host, it is impolite to ask for it directly. Iinstead the host asks the individual closest to the decanter, if he knows the bishop of Norwich or any other village in England. The question is not to provoke a reply but action the immediate passing of the port. Should the unfortunate offender answer the question by saying "No," is told that "the bishop is an awfully good fellow, but he never passes the port!" sparking, hopefully, the individual to realize he is hogging the decanter.Decanting the PortWhen decanted at the table, the bottle of Port should be finished in one sitting. Not recommended if there are only a few guests!
  • Passing the Port The most widely known tradition is believed to come from British naval customs for serving the wine. The decanter of port is placed in front of the host who then serves the guest to his right, then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side). The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.If the Port doesn't come backIf the decanter does not come full circle back to the host, it is impolite to ask for it directly. Iinstead the host asks the individual closest to the decanter, if he knows the bishop of Norwich or any other village in England. The question is not to provoke a reply but action the immediate passing of the port. Should the unfortunate offender answer the question by saying "No," is told that "the bishop is an awfully good fellow, but he never passes the port!" sparking, hopefully, the individual to realize he is hogging the decanter.Decanting the PortWhen decanted at the table, the bottle of Port should be finished in one sitting. Not recommended if there are only a few guests!
  • Passing the Port The most widely known tradition is believed to come from British naval customs for serving the wine. The decanter of port is placed in front of the host who then serves the guest to his right, then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side). The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.If the Port doesn't come backIf the decanter does not come full circle back to the host, it is impolite to ask for it directly. Iinstead the host asks the individual closest to the decanter, if he knows the bishop of Norwich or any other village in England. The question is not to provoke a reply but action the immediate passing of the port. Should the unfortunate offender answer the question by saying "No," is told that "the bishop is an awfully good fellow, but he never passes the port!" sparking, hopefully, the individual to realize he is hogging the decanter.Decanting the PortWhen decanted at the table, the bottle of Port should be finished in one sitting. Not recommended if there are only a few guests!
  • Passing the Port The most widely known tradition is believed to come from British naval customs for serving the wine. The decanter of port is placed in front of the host who then serves the guest to his right, then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side). The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.If the Port doesn't come backIf the decanter does not come full circle back to the host, it is impolite to ask for it directly. Iinstead the host asks the individual closest to the decanter, if he knows the bishop of Norwich or any other village in England. The question is not to provoke a reply but action the immediate passing of the port. Should the unfortunate offender answer the question by saying "No," is told that "the bishop is an awfully good fellow, but he never passes the port!" sparking, hopefully, the individual to realize he is hogging the decanter.Decanting the PortWhen decanted at the table, the bottle of Port should be finished in one sitting. Not recommended if there are only a few guests!
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards. By 1859 Pimm's was on sale outside of the restaurants and in1865 the company was sold to Frederick Sawyer and the first bottle of Pimm's is sold for 3 shillings.the first Pimm's Bar opened at the world famous tennis tournament, Wimbledon in 1971 and today over 80,000 pints of Pimm's and lemonade are sold every year to spectators.
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards.
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards. By 1859 Pimm's was on sale outside of the restaurants and in1865 the company was sold to Frederick Sawyer and the first bottle of Pimm's is sold for 3 shillings.the first Pimm's Bar opened at the world famous tennis tournament, Wimbledon in 1971 and today over 80,000 pints of Pimm's and lemonade are sold every year to spectators.
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards. By 1859 Pimm's was on sale outside of the restaurants and in1865 the company was sold to Frederick Sawyer and the first bottle of Pimm's is sold for 3 shillings.the first Pimm's Bar opened at the world famous tennis tournament, Wimbledon in 1971 and today over 80,000 pints of Pimm's and lemonade are sold every year to spectators.
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards. By 1859 Pimm's was on sale outside of the restaurants and in1865 the company was sold to Frederick Sawyer and the first bottle of Pimm's is sold for 3 shillings.the first Pimm's Bar opened at the world famous tennis tournament, Wimbledon in 1971 and today over 80,000 pints of Pimm's and lemonade are sold every year to spectators.
  • PimmsThe drink is so popular it is often thought of as the number two English drink, tea of course being the first.HistoryPimm's originated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, in the City of London, owned by James Pimm in 1840. Here he created the Pimm's 'house Cup' flavored with liqueurs and fruit extract.James Pimm is said to have blended his famous 'No 1 Cup', on the premises and it was then sold in pints in pewter tankards. By 1859 Pimm's was on sale outside of the restaurants and in1865 the company was sold to Frederick Sawyer and the first bottle of Pimm's is sold for 3 shillings.
  • People would come from near and far, and even though there were few telephonesWhen the people come into the house they kneel by the body and say a prayer. Close relatives kiss the cheek of the deceased. Then the visitors greet the family and offer some comforting words. This part of the wake is very solemn and respectful.In the past, there was always snuff and tobacco, tea, food, and spirits (of the drinking kind), offered to all who attended the wake. After the funeral, all the friends and relations drop by the house and partake of the vast quantities of food and drink that have appeared, as if by magic, into the house. Often, the family will arrive home and find that the house has been cleaned from top to bottom and every surface of the kitchen and beyond is weighed down with the best of food and drink. This is where the “Irish wake” stereotype comes from. The people gathered remember the life of the deceased, and the taller the story the better. A stranger would think there was a real hoolie going on, and in a sense there is: it’s a way to celebrate the life departed. There may be tears, but there’s plenty of laughter as well, as all the funny stories, happy times, and triumphs of the dead are shared and recorded in the memories of the living. The tradition of the Irish wake is changing. Most people aren’t waked from home. A
  • Skål, Akvavit and Danish drinking traditions The Danish word ‘Skål’ has two meanings: Cheers and Bowl.Before glasses and other fancy vessels were invented we drank out of a bowl, so actually it means ‘raise your bowl and drink’. In ancient Greece, the symposium was a drinking party, where they proposed a toast as an offering to their gods.  We did the same in Denmark and other Nordic countries although the parties and gods were pagan.  --- 
  •  Despite an informal lifestyle the rules for proposing a toast in Denmark and other Nordic countries has become a tradition. Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast. And a lot of toasts will be proposed afterwards. Today proposing a toast is a celebration of friendship and a wish for good health (and prosperity). A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer. After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink. At more informal parties (like staff Christmas parties) everybody replies with a ‘Skål’ before they drink. They might even yell it! Clinking glasses are also a part of the tradition. At more wild parties it also means: Buttoms up!!! Or as we say: Buttoms up and the rest in the hair. ---
  •  Despite an informal lifestyle the rules for proposing a toast in Denmark and other Nordic countries has become a tradition. Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast. And a lot of toasts will be proposed afterwards. Today proposing a toast is a celebration of friendship and a wish for good health (and prosperity). A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer. After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink. At more informal parties (like staff Christmas parties) everybody replies with a ‘Skål’ before they drink. They might even yell it! Clinking glasses are also a part of the tradition. At more wild parties it also means: Buttoms up!!! Or as we say: Buttoms up and the rest in the hair. ---
  •  Despite an informal lifestyle the rules for proposing a toast in Denmark and other Nordic countries has become a tradition. Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast. And a lot of toasts will be proposed afterwards. Today proposing a toast is a celebration of friendship and a wish for good health (and prosperity). A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer. After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink. At more informal parties (like staff Christmas parties) everybody replies with a ‘Skål’ before they drink. They might even yell it! Clinking glasses are also a part of the tradition. At more wild parties it also means: Buttoms up!!! Or as we say: Buttoms up and the rest in the hair. ---
  •  Despite an informal lifestyle the rules for proposing a toast in Denmark and other Nordic countries has become a tradition. Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast. And a lot of toasts will be proposed afterwards. Today proposing a toast is a celebration of friendship and a wish for good health (and prosperity). A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer. After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink. At more informal parties (like staff Christmas parties) everybody replies with a ‘Skål’ before they drink. They might even yell it! Clinking glasses are also a part of the tradition. At more wild parties it also means: Buttoms up!!! Or as we say: Buttoms up and the rest in the hair. ---
  •  Snaps are closely connected to the Danish Christmas- and Easter Lunches.These lunches’ features a variety of herring dishes, warm dishes like meatballs, roast pork, liver pâté etc, cold cuts and cheeses – all served with rye bread.  Snaps goes with the herring dishes and the cheese. Snaps comes in a lot of varieties and tasting experiences covers caraway, liquorice, dill, citrus, rosemary, pine, sherry oak/casks, coriander, ginger, bitter orange and sweet gale… Caraway is the most common. Try this link to the producer http://en.aalborgakvavit.dk/ Snaps are always served chilled – most of the varieties even freezing cold. There are also a lot of songs connected to drinking snaps. This is the most common: Haps, haps, haps,nu skal vi ha' snaps.No'et der vækker appetitten,no'et der rykker i bandittenhaps, haps, hapsnu skal vi ha' snaps.
  • The setup:a business like table setup with essentials and nothing more- bottles of vodka, glasses and food selected not for taste but for chemical properties that prolong a drinkers staying power.To Drink: vodka and only vodkaHow: Drink it neat and drink it allSipping shows a lack of enthusiasmDrink with the crowd: Everyone drinks togetherOffer a toastThen in one communal gulp all the glasses are emptiedNobody drinks again until the next toast is offeredDominating a bottle or pouring & drinking on your own is considered rude
  • The setup:a business like table setup with essentials and nothing more- bottles of vodka, glasses and food selected not for taste but for chemical properties that prolong a drinkers staying power.To Drink: vodka and only vodkaHow: Drink it neat and drink it allSipping shows a lack of enthusiasmDrink with the crowd: Everyone drinks togetherOffer a toastThen in one communal gulp all the glasses are emptiedNobody drinks again until the next toast is offeredDominating a bottle or pouring & drinking on your own is considered rude
  • The setup:a business like table setup with essentials and nothing more- bottles of vodka, glasses and food selected not for taste but for chemical properties that prolong a drinkers staying power.To Drink: vodka and only vodkaHow: Drink it neat and drink it allSipping shows a lack of enthusiasmDrink with the crowd: Everyone drinks togetherOffer a toastThen in one communal gulp all the glasses are emptiedNobody drinks again until the next toast is offeredDominating a bottle or pouring & drinking on your own is considered rude
  • The setup:a business like table setup with essentials and nothing more- bottles of vodka, glasses and food selected not for taste but for chemical properties that prolong a drinkers staying power.To Drink: vodka and only vodkaHow: Drink it neat and drink it allSipping shows a lack of enthusiasmDrink with the crowd: Everyone drinks togetherOffer a toastThen in one communal gulp all the glasses are emptiedNobody drinks again until the next toast is offeredDominating a bottle or pouring & drinking on your own is considered rude
  • Stand a round: if at a bar, everyone at the party should buy a roundHave a bite:Between rounds, Russians eat “Zacuski” special foods who composition buffers the effects of alcohol.Zakuski tend to be acidic, salt or oily. Slice of lemon, pickles, salted cucumber, caviar as well as herring or other fish in oil, often accompanied by cold boiled potatoes or blini
  • Sake actually came from China but it is Japan that considers its national beverageStarted as a rudementary Farmers brew until AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department, a movement that took sake from being a common farmers brew to something that was valued by the rulers of society. Over the next 400 years Sake was fine tuned and ultimately they started using the methods that are still being used today. By the 16C , local breweries, run by brewers began to take the market over from the Monks and began serving the common man as well as the the aristocratic.Different styles of sake started to form and the flavors were influenced by the areas of which the rice was grown (water, terrior , climate etc)1575 , Two major development occurred rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners, Two: Sake was incorporated into the japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • Sake actually came from China but it is Japan that considers its national beverageStarted as a rudementary Farmers brew until AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department, a movement that took sake from being a common farmers brew to something that was valued by the rulers of society. Over the next 400 years Sake was fine tuned and ultimately they started using the methods that are still being used today. By the 16C , local breweries, run by brewers began to take the market over from the Monks and began serving the common man as well as the the aristocratic.Different styles of sake started to form and the flavors were influenced by the areas of which the rice was grown (water, terrior , climate etc)1575 , Two major development occurred rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners, Two: Sake was incorporated into the japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • Sake actually came from China but it is Japan that considers its national beverageStarted as a rudementary Farmers brew until AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department, a movement that took sake from being a common farmers brew to something that was valued by the rulers of society. Over the next 400 years Sake was fine tuned and ultimately they started using the methods that are still being used today. By the 16C , local breweries, run by brewers began to take the market over from the Monks and began serving the common man as well as the the aristocratic.Different styles of sake started to form and the flavors were influenced by the areas of which the rice was grown (water, terrior , climate etc)1575 , Two major development occurred rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners, Two: Sake was incorporated into the japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • Sake actually came from China but it is Japan that considers its national beverageStarted as a rudementary Farmers brew until AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department, a movement that took sake from being a common farmers brew to something that was valued by the rulers of society. Over the next 400 years Sake was fine tuned and ultimately they started using the methods that are still being used today. By the 16C , local breweries, run by brewers began to take the market over from the Monks and began serving the common man as well as the the aristocratic.Different styles of sake started to form and the flavors were influenced by the areas of which the rice was grown (water, terrior , climate etc)1575 , Two major development occurred rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners, Two: Sake was incorporated into the japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • Sake actually came from China but it is Japan that considers its national beverageStarted as a rudementary Farmers brew until AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department, a movement that took sake from being a common farmers brew to something that was valued by the rulers of society. Over the next 400 years Sake was fine tuned and ultimately they started using the methods that are still being used today. By the 16C , local breweries, run by brewers began to take the market over from the Monks and began serving the common man as well as the the aristocratic.Different styles of sake started to form and the flavors were influenced by the areas of which the rice was grown (water, terrior , climate etc)1575 , Two major development occurred rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners, Two: Sake was incorporated into the japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined
  • 1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • 1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • 1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • 1698: Over 27,000 sake breweries dotted the island. Each representing the region and the cuisine which they were a part of. By 1800’s: Japan’s national identity is aligned with Sake and vica versa. Japan has no other national beverage
  • 1904- The Government did something surprising, it decided to take an active role in the future of the “drink of the gods”. It opened the National ResarchIntittue of Brewing to promote changes in the sake field. Very Novel Concept “ imagine the US governement promoting the betterment of Beer!!!Sake became the drink for almost everyone!!WW2 took a big toll on the Sake industry. Rice had to be rationed so many of the distilleries shut down . At one point there was only 3,000. Distilled grain spirits was blended with the Sake, so entire generation of Sake drinkers was brought up on this fake stuff.. After the war the young generation wanted nothing to do with what they partentsdranks.Thank fully craft brewers are coming back, and great sake is slowly seaping back into the industry.
  • 1904- The Government did something surprising, it decided to take an active role in the future of the “drink of the gods”. It opened the National ResarchIntittue of Brewing to promote changes in the sake field. Very Novel Concept “ imagine the US governement promoting the betterment of Beer!!!Sake became the drink for almost everyone!!WW2 took a big toll on the Sake industry. Rice had to be rationed so many of the distilleries shut down . At one point there was only 3,000. Distilled grain spirits was blended with the Sake, so entire generation of Sake drinkers was brought up on this fake stuff.. After the war the young generation wanted nothing to do with what they partentsdranks.Thank fully craft brewers are coming back, and great sake is slowly seaping back into the industry.
  • 1904- The Government did something surprising, it decided to take an active role in the future of the “drink of the gods”. It opened the National ResarchIntittue of Brewing to promote changes in the sake field. Very Novel Concept “ imagine the US governement promoting the betterment of Beer!!!Sake became the drink for almost everyone!!WW2 took a big toll on the Sake industry. Rice had to be rationed so many of the distilleries shut down . At one point there was only 3,000. Distilled grain spirits was blended with the Sake, so entire generation of Sake drinkers was brought up on this fake stuff.. After the war the young generation wanted nothing to do with what they partentsdranks.Thank fully craft brewers are coming back, and great sake is slowly seaping back into the industry.
  • From Japanese usually don't start drinking until someone offers the toast "kampai"—(dry glass). The Chinese and Koreans use the same word for their toasts. As the evening progresses, Japanese often shout "banzai!" three times. It means "live ten thousand years" and is the equivalent of saying "hip. hip, hooray!" The custom of raising a glass and saying a loud toast caught on in the later half of the Meiji Period (1868-1912) and was influenced by the British Royal navy.When drinking, one should not drink from the bottle or fill his or her own glass. The polite thing to do is fill someone else's glass and they in turn will fill yours. In some situations, it is rude to turn down a drink that is being offered to you. To avoid drinking to much keep you glass full. To avoid being rude accept a drink the first time it is offered to you by a particular individual. The second time he offers it is acceptable to politely say no. These days Japanese often order beer by the glass rather than the bottle which means they are less likely to pour drinks for each than they did in the past. Often younger people hold the bottle with one hand when pouring for older people when etiquette requires them to hold it with two hands. This trend is attributed to decline if drinking between older and young people.
  • From Japanese usually don't start drinking until someone offers the toast "kampai"—(dry glass). The Chinese and Koreans use the same word for their toasts. As the evening progresses, Japanese often shout "banzai!" three times. It means "live ten thousand years" and is the equivalent of saying "hip. hip, hooray!" The custom of raising a glass and saying a loud toast caught on in the later half of the Meiji Period (1868-1912) and was influenced by the British Royal navy.When drinking, one should not drink from the bottle or fill his or her own glass. The polite thing to do is fill someone else's glass and they in turn will fill yours. In some situations, it is rude to turn down a drink that is being offered to you. To avoid drinking to much keep you glass full. To avoid being rude accept a drink the first time it is offered to you by a particular individual. The second time he offers it is acceptable to politely say no. These days Japanese often order beer by the glass rather than the bottle which means they are less likely to pour drinks for each than they did in the past. Often younger people hold the bottle with one hand when pouring for older people when etiquette requires them to hold it with two hands. This trend is attributed to decline if drinking between older and young people.

Transcript

  • 1. Global Drinking Rituals
  • 2. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
  • 3. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
    a secret recipe of all natural 40 herbs & spices
  • 4. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
    a secret recipe of all natural 40 herbs & spices
    Saffron is one of the key ingredients
  • 5. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
    a secret recipe of all natural 14 herbs & spices
    Saffron is one of the key ingredients
    Macerated 1 year in a oak barrel
  • 6. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
    a secret recipe of all natural 14 herbs & spices
    Saffron is one of the key ingredients
    Macerated 1 year in a oak barrels
    Rumors of Opiates ie Codeine, wormwood, chin chonaetc
  • 7. Fernet-Branca
    1845- An Amaro created in Milan by a gentleman named BernadinoBranca & his 3 sons
    a secret recipe of all natural 14 herbs & spices
    Saffron is one of the key ingredient
    Macerated 1 year in a oak barrel
    Rumors of Opiates ie Codeine, wormwood, chin chonaetc
    Marketed as cure for all stomach ailments
  • 8. The Allure of Fernet
    Brought in by Italian immigrants to San Francisco
    Prohibition- Sold as a medicine- Popularity soared
    American distillery built
    Government regulated opiate levels
  • 9. Fernet and San Francisco
    The San Francisco Market drinks 50% of Fernet imported to the US
    Bartenders Cult Favorite
    The drink of choice Fernet andGinger ale
    The perfect Hang Over Cure
    R Bar, Alsman and Chris Fogarty Sell more Fernet then anyone
  • 10. Fernet on Tap
    SF- Bullit and Tonic
    Citizen House Boston
    Favorite
  • 11. Bar Staff drinking Rituals
    DEATH AND COMPANY
  • 12. 1 am –Reading Lager
    Sunday night Sazeracs
    Monday nt Ti Punch
  • 13. Varnish in LA
  • 14. The Varnish
    Whisky and 1 oj for carlos
  • 15. Vessel In Seattle
    Family Shot, Safety Meetings and Rye Whiskey
  • 16. Bar Staff drinking Rituals
    Clives in Victoria Canada, Milano Drop Shot, Created on New Years Eve
  • 17. Ancient Drinking Rituals
    Since the time alcohol was created drinking with a purpose began
    ancient Egyptians
    Paid homage to the gods
    Paid homage to dead
    Greeks:
    Believe the gods only listened if wine was offered and drank
    Oaths were sealed with wine
    Speakers only believed if they had consumed wine
    Belief:
    Those who did drink and only consumed water were believed to lack passion but also smell. If they visited a public bath others would get out
    Romans
    Offered wine before going into battle
    Germains
    Found it necessary to drink beer, getting drunk an essential prelude to decision making
    Christian s drinking the blood of christ
    Reference-” Drink” by Iain Gately
  • 18. Ancient Drinking Rituals
    The Huns
    Destroyed everything in their path
    Drank Kumis- fermented mares milk
    Anglo-Saxons and Vikings
    Drank mead
    Mead/Viking halls
    Aztecs- Drank Pulqe
    Japanese- Sake
  • 19. What is a Toast
    toast is a ritual in which a drink is taken as an expression of honor or goodwill.
  • 20. Clinking of the Glasses
    Ancient Greeks- Fear of being poisoned
  • 21. Clinking of the Glasses
    Ancient Greeks- Fear of being poisoned
    The Norse: Drinking out of enemies Skull….Skaol
  • 22. Clinking of the Glasses
    Ancient Greeks- Fear of being poisoned
    The Norse: Drinking out of enemies Skull….Skaol
    Christians: Clinking of glasses sounded like church bells- ward of the Devil
  • 23. Clinking of the Glasses
    Ancient Greeks- Fear of being poisoned
    The Norse: Drinking out of enemies Skull….Skaol
    Christians: Clinking of glasses sounded like church bells- ward of the Devil
    Vikings- Smashing of Goblets-Look in the eye
  • 24. Look Me in the Eye
    It all began with the Vikings
    heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye.
  • 25. Look Me in the Eye
    It all began with the Vikings
    heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye.
    Poison would be transferred
  • 26. Look Me in the Eye
    It all began with the Vikings
    heartily clink their mugs together before battle, after battle or whenever gathering and look each other in the eye.
    Poison would be transferred
    It is supposed that the looking in the eye would further the honorable intention that no, I did not drop poison in your cup
  • 27. The French
    In France they say Sante’ ( to your health)
  • 28. The French
    In France they say Sante’ ( to your health)
    you must maintain eye contact
  • 29. The French
    In France they say Sante’ ( to your health)
    you must maintain eye contact
    you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group
  • 30. The French
    In France they say Sante’ ( to your health)
    you must maintain eye contact
    you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group
    you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.
  • 31. The French
    In France they say Sante’ ( to your health)
    you must maintain eye contact
    you must clink glasses individually with each person in your group
    you must not cross anyone else’s arm as you do it. Time consuming and tedious.
    So, why does everyone bother? Turns out there’s a pretty severe penalty for messing this one up.
    “Seven years of bad sex,” said every Frenchman and woman I met.
  • 32. Modern Day Drinking
  • 33. The pickle back
  • 34. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell
  • 35. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell
    Inspired by dish he consumed in Italy- Spagettie with sauce and clams
  • 36. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell
    Inspired by dish he consumed in Italy- Spagettie with sauce and clams
    Within 5 years it became Calagary most requested cocktail
  • 37. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell
    Inspired by dish he consumed in Italy- Spagettie with sauce and clams
    Within 5 years it became Calagary most requested cocktail
    2009- 40th anniversary it became the national drink of Canada
  • 38. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell
    Inspired by dish he consumed in Italy- Spagettie with sauce and clams
    Within 5 years it became Calagary most requested cocktail
    2009- 40th anniversary it became the national drink of Canada
    It is claimed that over 350 million Caesars are consumed in Canada annually
    It Inspired the creation of Motts Clamato juice, over 85% of all Caesars sold are made with this base.
  • 39. Our neighbors the Canadians
    Vodka
    Tomato Juice
    Clam juice
    Horseradish
    Lemon juice
    Worchestire
    Tobasco
    Celery Salt
    Black Pepper
  • 40. The Sour toe Club Legend
    Toe # 1: Louie Liken, trapper, rum runner, lost his toe to frost bite, kept the toe pickeled in a jar alchohol
  • 41. The Sour toe Club Legend
    Toe # 1: Louie Liken, trapper, rum runner, lost his toe to frost bite, kept the toe pickeled in a jar alchohol
    Discovered years later in their cabin by Captain Dick Stevenson the owner of Eldorado Hotel in 1973
  • 42. The Sour toe Club Legend
    Toe # 1: Louie Liken, trapper, rum runner, lost his toe to frost bite, kept the toe pickeled in a jar alchohol
    Discovered years later in their cabin by Captain Dick Stevenson the owner of Eldorado Hotel in 1973
    Came up with the drinking rules for the Sour Toe Club
  • 43. The Sour toe Club Legend
    Toe # 1: Louie Liken, trapper, rum runner, lost his toe to frost bite, kept the toe pickeled in a jar alchohol
    Discovered years later in their cabin by Captain Dick Stevenson the owner of Eldorado Hotel in 1973
    Came up with the drinking rules for the Sour Toe Club
    Toe accidentally swallowed by a miner in 1980
    It was never recovered.
  • 44. The Sour toe Club Rules
    Original rule: The toe must be placed in a beer glass full of champagne, now you can drink it with anything
    The toe must touch the drinker's lips during the consumption of the alcohol before he or she can claim to be a true Sourtoer.
    One Rule never changes:
    The drinker's lips must touch the toe. " You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow-- But the lips have gotta touch the toe."
  • 45. The Toe Source
    Toe #2 Donated by a Alberta women, who gave her amputated middle toe
    Toe was lost during renovations to the bar
    Toe# 3 Sent by a Trapper. Big toe removed due to Frostbite
    60 Soldiers came in to do the Toe and # 3 went missing
    Captain returned it but its return was short lived then it was accidentally swallowed by a baseball player from inuvik
  • 46. The Toe Source
    Toe #4 Donated by anonymous donor. It was stolen by a hunter who refused to give it back until charges were threatened
    Toe# 5&6 : Donated by Yukon old timer who wishes to remaining anonymous.
    Insisted that his nurses drink the sour toe for free
  • 47. The Toe Source
    Toe #7 Donated by someone who read about the sourtoe in the newspaper
    Toe# 8 : Learned the hard lesson of not to mow your lawn with open toe sandals.
  • 48. Latin America
    Brazil
    Cuba
    Argentina
    Venezuela
    Mexico
  • 49. Honoring the Dead
    A libationis a ritual pouring of a drink as an offering to a God or Spirit or in memory of those who have died.
  • 50. Pouring One Out
    Gangster 40 ounce
    One for me, and one for my homies."
    Cuban bartenders spill a drop of rum
    Russian- offer a drop of vodka
  • 51. Venezuela El-Ritual
    1st: You need a quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario,
  • 52. Venezuela El-Ritual
    1st: You need a quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, 2nd : you need a few limes cut into wedges.
  • 53. Venezuela El-Ritual
    1st: You need a quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, 2nd : you need a few limes cut into wedges.3rd: you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.
  • 54. Venezuela El-Ritual
    1st: You need a quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, 2nd : you need a few limes cut into wedges.3rd: you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.4th take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.
  • 55. Venezuela El-Ritual
    1st: You need a quality sipping rums like PamperoAniversario, 2nd : you need a few limes cut into wedges.3rd: you pour brown sugar and instant coffee into two separate piles on a dish or tray.4th take a lime wedge, dip one side into the sugar, the other into the coffee and bite and suck on it.
    5th: Take a sip of your rum to let all the flavours mingle.
  • 56. Brazil
    Caipriniah- National Drink of Brazil- means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese
  • 57. Brazil
    Caipriniah- National Drink of Brazil- means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese
    Chachaca, Lime and Sugar
  • 58. Brazil
    Caipriniah- National Drink of Brazil- means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese
    Chachaca, Lime and Sugar
    1920s, cachaça had become a symbol of Brazilian identity,.
  • 59. Brazil
    Caipriniah- National Drink of Brazil- means ‘little countryside drink’ in Portuguese
    Chachaca, Lime and Sugar
    1920s, cachaça had become a symbol of Brazilian identity,.
    Brazilians drink a staggering 200 million liters of every year.
  • 60. FERNET IN ARGENTINA
  • 61. Mexico
    Sangrita
    The Palamo
    The Tequila Shot
  • 62. La Paloma
    La Paloma2 oz. reposado tequila
    1 oz. simple syrup.5 oz. lime juice1.5 oz. fresh pink grapefruit juice
    3 dashes of grapefruit bittersTop with sodaGlass: highball rimmed with sea salt
    Garnish: lime wedge and straw
  • 63. Sangrita
    Sangrita = Little Blood
    Origins date back to 1920’s in Guadalajara.
    originated from the leftover juices (mainly orange) of an equally popular regional fruit salad “Pico De Gallo” covered with fine chili powder.
  • 64. Sangrita
    Pico De Gallo: consumed from a large bowl during breakfast
    the remaining juice was saved and poured on a small and narrow clay cup
    precursor of the tequila shot glass.
    Late 1990’s its popularity began to expand pass its borders
  • 65. Sangrita
    3/4 cup tomato sauce
    ½ cup of orange juice
    3 tablespoons of fresh lime juice
    ¼ teaspoon of onion powder
    ¼ teaspoon of salt
    ½ teaspoon of sugar
    ½ teaspoon of chile powder
    1 tablespoon of hot sauce
    Combine all the ingredients in a pitcher, chill in the fridge before serving.
    Served alongside a shot of Tequila (Blanco or Reposado)
  • 66. Tequila Shot
  • 67. Don Julio luxury drop
    BRIAN VAN FLANDERN
  • 68.
  • 69.
  • 70.
  • 71.
  • 72. Agave Drop
    1.5 Don Julio Blanco
    .5 Lime juice
    .5 Agave nectar
    1 lime wedge
  • 73. Europe
    Germany- Prost/Beer
    France- Wine and more wine
    England- Pass the Port
    Tennis Anyone- Pimms
    Ireland- The Irish Wake
    Danish- Skaal
    Greece: 0pa
  • 74. Great Britain- Pass the Port
    The host who then serves the guest to his right
  • 75. Great Britain- Pass the Port
    The host who then serves the guest to his right
    Then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side).
  • 76. Great Britain- Pass the Port
    The host who then serves the guest to his right
    Then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side).
    The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.
  • 77. Great Britain- Pass the Port
    The host who then serves the guest to his right
    Then passes the decanter to the guest on his left (port-side).
    The port is then passed to the left all the way back to the host.
    How to get people not to hog the port
  • 78. Great Britain- Pimms
    Pimm'soriginated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, owned by James Pimm in 1840.
  • 79. Great Britain- Pimms
    Pimm'soriginated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, owned by James Pimm in 1840.
    The original Pimm's No 1 was made using gin, quinine and a secret mixture of herbs as an aid to digestion.
  • 80. Great Britain- Pimms
    Pimm'soriginated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, owned by James Pimm in 1840.
    The original Pimm's No 1 was made using gin, quinine and a secret mixture of herbs as an aid to digestion.
    1859 he began selling it to other restaurants
  • 81. Great Britain- Pimms
    Pimm'soriginated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, owned by James Pimm in 1840.
    The original Pimm's No 1 was made using gin, quinine and a secret mixture of herbs as an aid to digestion.
    1859 he began selling it to other restaurants
    The Pimm's'house Cup' glass and fill it with ice, mix one part Pimm's No. 1 with 3 parts chilled lemonade, add some mint, cucumber, orange and strawberry.
    After World War two, the range was extended Scotch for No. 2 cup, No. 3 brandy, No. 4 rum, No. 5 rye and No. 6 vodka.
  • 82. Great Britain- Pimms
    Pimm'soriginated in an Oyster Bar in Poultry Street, owned by James Pimm in 1840.
    The original Pimm's No 1 was made using gin, quinine and a secret mixture of herbs as an aid to digestion.
    1859 he began selling it to other restaurants
    The Pimm's'house Cup' glass and fill it with ice, mix one part Pimm's No. 1 with 3 parts chilled lemonade, add some mint, cucumber, orange and strawberry.
    After World War two, the range was extended Scotch for No. 2 cup, No. 3 brandy, No. 4 rum, No. 5 rye and No. 6 vodka.
  • 83. Great Britain- Pimms
    The first Pimm'sBar opened at the world famous tennis tournament, Wimbledon
    Today over 80,000 pints of Pimm's and lemonade are sold every year to spectators.
    1971-
  • 84. Irish Wake
  • 85. The Danish
    Skal: Cheers and Bowl
    Early begins the toast was and offering to the Gods
  • 86. The Danish
    Rules of given a toast:
    Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast.
     
     
  • 87. The Danish
    Rules of given a toast:
    Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast.
     
     A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer.
    ---
  • 88. The Danish
    Rules of given a toast:
    Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast.
     
     A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer.
    After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink.
  • 89. The Danish
    Rules of given a toast:
    Denmark you do not drink (at the table) until the host has proposed a toast.
     
     A toast during a formal dinner goes with almost anything like wine and beer.
    After the toast has been proposed the rest of the party raises their glasses and greet each other with a nod before they drink.
     
    At more informal parties (like staff Christmas parties) everybody replies with a ‘Skål’ before they drink. They might even yell it!
    Clinking glasses are also a part of the tradition.
     
    At more wild parties it also means: Buttoms up!!! Or as we say: Buttoms up and the rest in the hair.
     
    ---
  • 90. The Danish
     
    At informal and wild parties singing will be involved. This is the most common:
      
    In English without the rhymes:
     
    We propose a toast to our friends,
    and to people we know.
    And to people we don’t know,
    we propose a toast as well.
    Cheers - cheers
     
  • 91. Drinking Song
  • 92. Eastern Europe
    Party A La Russe
  • 93. Party A La Russe
    Set up: Bottles of vodka, glasses and food
  • 94. Party A La Russe
    Set up: Bottles of vodka, glasses and food
    To Drink: vodka and only vodka
    How: Drink it neat and drink it all
  • 95. Party A La Russe
    Set up: Bottles of vodka, glasses and food
    To Drink: vodka and only vodka
    How: Drink it neat and drink it all
    Drink with the crowd:
    Offer a toast
    Offer a toast:vasheezda-ró-vye] – Your health!
    Everyone is expected to make one
    The person giving the toast refills everyone's glass
  • 96. Party A La Russe
    communal gulp
    Nobody drinks again until the next toast is offered
    No dominating a bottle
    pouring & drinking on your own is considered rude
  • 97. Party A La Russe
    Stand a round: if at a bar, everyone at the party should buy a round
    Have a bite:
    Between rounds, Russians eat “Zacuski”
    Zakuskitend to be acidic, salt or oily.
    Slice of lemon, pickles, salted cucumber, caviar as well as herring or other fish in oil, often accompanied by cold boiled potatoes or blini
  • 98. Party A La Russe
    Pace Yourself: After the first three rounds it is acceptable to sit out a few
    Mind the empties: no empties on the table, empties are a sign of poverty
    Go The Duration if you can: They can last all night and are typically followed by dinner
  • 99. Japan
    Originally from China but considered Japans national beverage
  • 100. Japan
    Originally from China but considered Japans national beverage
    Started as a rudimentary Farmers brew
  • 101. Japan
    Originally from China but considered Japans national beverage
    Started as a rudimentary Farmers brew
    AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department
  • 102. Japan
    Originally from China but considered Japans national beverage
    Started as a rudimentary Farmers brew
    AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department
    next 400 years Sake was fine tuned
  • 103. Japan
    Originally from China but considered Japans national beverage
    Started as a rudimentary Farmers brew
    AD689 when the Imperial Palace established a brewing department
    next 400 years Sake was fine tuned
  • 104. Sake
    1575 , Two major development occurred :
    One: rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners,
  • 105. Sake
    1575 , Two major development occurred :
    One: rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners,
    Two: Sake was incorporated into the Japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined
  • 106. Sake
    1575 , Two major development occurred :
    One: rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners,
    Two: Sake was incorporated into the Japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined
    1698- 27, 000 sake breweries
  • 107. Sake
    1575 , Two major development occurred :
    One: rice began to polished- gone were all the congeners,
    Two: Sake was incorporated into the Japanese tea Ceremony and for the first time food and sake were combined
    1698- 27, 000 sake breweries
    1800’s- Japan national identity is aligned with japan
  • 108. Asia
    1904- It opened the National Research Institute of Brewing to promote changes in the sake field.
  • 109. Asia
    1904- It opened the National Research Institute of Brewing to promote changes in the sake field.
    This is like the US gov spending money promoting the betterment of Beer!!!
  • 110. Asia
    WW2- Kills the sake industry
    Rice Shortage
    Grain alcohol added
    New generation shy’s away from parents drink
  • 111. Ritual of Drinking Sake
    Japanese usually don't start drinking until someone offers the toast "kampai"—(dry glass).
    .As the evening progresses, Japanese often shout "banzai!" three times. It means "live ten thousand years“
    It is the equivalent of saying "hip. hip, hooray!“
    .
  • 112. Ritual of Drinking Sake
    When drinking, one should not drink from the bottle or fill his or her own glass.
    The polite thing to do is fill someone else's glass and they in turn will fill yours.
    In some situations, it is rude to turn down a drink that is being offered to you.
    To avoid drinking to much keep you glass full.
    To avoid being rude accept a drink the first time it is offered to you by a particular individual.
    The second time he offers it is acceptable to politely say no.