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The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era
 

The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era

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Our latest survey uncovers consumer behaviors and attitudes towards print and digital media that can inform an approach. Newspaper and magazine publishers that are committed to finding new ways of ...

Our latest survey uncovers consumer behaviors and attitudes towards print and digital media that can inform an approach. Newspaper and magazine publishers that are committed to finding new ways of differentiating and continuously improving their offerings to better meet the needs of their readers will outlive competitors in this rapidly evolving digital era.

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    The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era Presentation Transcript

    • Survey Background This online study polled 1,010 US adults over the age of 18 who had read at least one magazine or newspaper in the past month. Respondents had to have either read the magazine(s) or newspaper(s) in print, online (i.e., using a computer or mobile web browser), or via a dedicated application (e.g., using an iPad or iPhone app). The survey was developed to examine consumer attitudes and behaviors towards newspapers and magazines in both print and digital format. Executive Summary Traditional media publishers continue to face a difficult financial outlook due to dwindling readership and advertising revenues. At the same time, new technologies and social media are having a major impact on consumer behavior. Increasingly, users expect to be able to access content anytime, anywhere, on devices of their choosing. As with other types of digital content such as music and games, members of Gen Y (ages 18-34) exhibit an early-adopter profile when it comes to the number of advanced consumer electronics they use for reading publications. While tablets, smartphones, and eReaders open new distribution channels, publishers face challenges in maintaining and monetizing customer relationships that have been fragmented by countless platforms, devices, and services. Many people show willingness to pay for digital magazine and newspaper content, but most have not yet started doing so. Years of ad-supported free websites and discounted subscriptions have accustomed consumers to pay little or nothing for digital content. In a competitive media landscape, publishers need to innovate like never before to reach prospects and supplement advertising revenue with user payments. With few bona fide successes to look to for guidance, publishers must explore a variety of monetization strategies to find combinations that resonate with target audiences. Magazines and newspapers that gain a deep understanding of target audiences through qualitative and quantitative research will stand a better chance than most of crafting differentiated content, solutions, and services that consumers value with both their time and their money.2 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Key Findings During an average week, how much time do you Print trumps digital for newspaper and spend reading the following: magazine readers. Over 5 hours 1-2 hours None While nearly half of US adults now read at least some 3-5 hours Less than 1 hour digital magazine and newspaper content, print remains the dominant format. Almost eight in ten US adults have read print Print magazines or newspapers 13% 20 35 27 5 newspapers or magazines in the past month. Of those who read print publications, 33% spend 3 hours or more [Figure 1] per Magazines or newspapers online week doing so. Unsurprisingly, older adults (55+) tend to be the 6% 11 26 27 30 (e.g., using your computer or mobile web browser) heaviest consumers.Magazines or newspapers via a dedicated application 4% 5 10 17 64 (e.g., Wired magazine iPad app) Digital formats have yet to be consumed as much as print; still 47% of adults have read publications online in the past month. 0% 100% Magazine and newspaper applications are on the rise; 19% of readers use them regularly (at least one hour per week). Younger Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 1] consumers (ages 18-34), particularly men, are significantly more likely than average to read digital content online and through dedicated mobile and PC apps.3 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements about newspapers and magazines? Plentiful, all too similar online content is Strongly agree Moderately agree devalued by consumers. Moderately disagree Strongly disagree Unsure In line with our previously discussed findings, three in four I should get free access to the digital or online 55% 27 6 8 5 newspaper and magazine readers (76%) prefer reading print issues if I already have a print subscription newspapers and magazines over digital versions [Figure 2]. I should get free access to back issues if I buy a digital subscription 43%47% 33 8 7 5 This preference drops to two in three (67%) among younger The quality of the content is more 37% 40 5 13 4 consumers. important than the format I only read certain sections regularly 32% 44 3 14 7 While the majority of those surveyed appreciate the convenience I prefer reading print publications 43% 33 5 13 5 of digital delivery (59%), many value print more highly. Many people (49%) indicated that they would pay more for a physical I like receiving new editions the minute they are published 28% 41 7 16 7 copy than the online version, and a whopping 82% believe I should be able to loan content to someone print subscriptions should come free with digital access. Most 27% 34 14 16 9 else if I buy a digital subscription consumers are also exhibiting signs of content fatigue, with 60% Content seems similar from publication to publication 17% 43 8 24 8 finding print and digital articles to be similar from one publication I like being able to read on any device, 27% 32 10 17 14 to the next. anywhere, anytime I would pay more for the print issue than the online or digital issue 16% 33 11 22 18 In a competitive media landscape, newspapers and magazines I like being able to start reading on one device and 19% 28 16 18 18 clearly are facing an uphill battle to maintain and monetizecontinue reading from where I left off on another device customer relationships. Years of ad-supported free websites and 28 discounted subscriptions have accustomed consumers to pay 0% 100% little or nothing for digital content. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 2]4 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Which of the following devices do you regularly use to read newspapers (online or via a dedicated application)? Laptop or desktop computer 57% Smartphone (e.g., iPhone, BlackBerry, Android) 13% Small screen devices are increasingly used iPad or other tablet computer 6% to read content. eReader(e.g., Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook etc.) 6% The phenomenal popularity of smartphones, iPads, and eReaders has led to a rapid rise in media applications and, None of the above 37% subsequently, to an increase in reading across multiple devices. Although about half of magazine and newspaper consumers read on personal computers, over 10% also now read on 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% smartphones [Figures 3a and 3b]. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 3a] As with other types of digital content such as music and games, members of Gen Y (ages 18-34) exhibit an early-adopter profile Which of the following devices do you regularly use when it comes to the number of advanced consumer electronics to read magazines (online or via a dedicated they use for reading publications. They are more than twice as application)? likely as the general population to consume newspaper and magazine content on smartphones, tablets, and eReaders. To Laptop or desktop computer reach these early technology adopters (and their even more 49% connected younger siblings) publishers must go beyond simply Smartphone 11% offering multi-platform access to fully exploit the capabilities of (e.g., iPhone, BlackBerry, Android) small screen devices and bring new experiences to readers. iPad or other tablet computer 6% eReader 6%(e.g., Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook etc.) None of the above 45% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 3b]5 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Readers spend little on digital publications, so far. Of those surveyed, 15% spent more than $100 in the past year In the past year, how much did you pay for on print publications alone, with 5% paying a similar amount for newspapers and magazines in the following formats: combined print and digital subscriptions [Figure 4]. Only 16% spent anything at all on digital newspapers and magazines Over $100 $26-$50 $0 alone. Although subscription payment services were announced $51-$100 $25 or less Don’t remember in February by both Apple and Google, a large scale market, wherein users pay for exclusive access to digital publications, Print issues and subscriptions of newspapers 15% 16 17 30 17 5 has not yet developed. and magazines onlyCombined print and digital subscriptions of newspapers In line with their reading habits, older consumers (55+) tend to 5% 4 6 14 64 7 and magazines (e.g., single price to get both versions) be the biggest print spenders, but are unaccustomed to paying Digital or online issues and subscriptions of for digital access. In sharp contrast, while younger consumers newspapers and magazines only 11 4 10% 78 5 continue to buy print publications, 32% also paid to access digital newspapers and magazines in the past year. Having 0% 100% watched ecommerce apps become commonplace, members of Gen Y (ages 18-34) are used to buying digital content such as Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 4] movies. However, even younger consumers are reluctant to pay much for content; most of those who bought digital publications last year spent under $25, with just a tiny percentage (4%) paying $100 plus.6 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Please indicate whether the following features would Better pricing is not the only way to or would not be likely to encourage you to buy online or digital newspapers or magazines compel purchase. Many publishers are facing a poor financial outlook due to Very likely Somewhat likely shrinking readership and advertising revenues. At the same time, Not very likely Not at all likely Unsure with the glut of free content available, there is little evidence of consumer demand for paid content. So what might encourage consumers to purchase digital magazines and newspapers in Lower price than the print version 38% 35 3 12 11 this post-recessionary climate? Free trial or promotional offer 31% 36 3 18 13 (e.g., 20% off regular price)Ability to clip and organize interesting content for later use (e.g., recipes) 28% 36 2 18 16 Of those surveyed, 73% indicated that a digital publication with Access to back issues included in the price 26% 35 3 19 16 a lower price than the print version could compel them to buy, followed by free trials and promotions at 67% [Figure 5]. Personalized content based on my location, interests etc. 23% 38 3 21 15 Currently, many publishers offer their digital content at a Ability to share your issue or subscription with a friend or family member 26% 33 2 23 16 premium, penalizing those who choose it over print. For Recommendations from friends, colleagues etc. 16% 33 3 27 21 example, Wired sells 12-issue print subscriptions for just $10 but charges $3.99 for each iPad edition. Editorial content not available elsewhere 17% 31 4 28 20 Ability to read on multiple devices (e.g., laptop, smartphone, iPad etc.) 20% 26 3 24 27 Two thirds of consumers value the ability to clip and organize Interactive experience with video interviews, community, Q&A etc. 15% 27 5 28 25 digital content for later use (64%), a feature that is not always available, or well advertised. Affluent, university-educated consumers and members of Gen Y (ages 18-34) view exclusive 0% 100% editorial content as more of an enticement to purchase than Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 5] other readers. Younger adults also find interactive content, multi-device access, and issue sharing attractive.7 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Readers are open to multiple payment How appealing are the following payment options for digital or online newspapers and magazines? models. Very appealing Somewhat appealing Over half of adults find all-you-can-read subscriptions (62%) Not very appealing Not at all appealing Unsure and free-mium models (55%) appealing [Figure 6]. Although subscription payment services were announced in February byPaying a at monthly fee to read any magazine or both Apple and Google, a large scale paying audience for digital 6newspaper by the publisher (e.g., all-you-can-read) 26% 36 14 18 publications has not yet developed. Reading for free if ad content is doubled 30% 29 6 16 19 Purchasing a monthly or yearly subscription 20% 36 7 18 19 The study revealed that 59% of adults are willing to accept to a single publication Paying for the premium version but additional advertising to subsidize digital publication costs. 27% 28 8 15 22 the standard version is free Generally the younger the consumer, the more open they are to Reading for free if you refer enough friends 25% 25 8 18 24 heavy ad content; 68% of those aged 18-34 would accept more Getting a discount if you buy with others (e.g., bulk purchase) 17% 32 8 18 26 ads to gain free access, compared to 47% of respondents 55 Paying just for articles or features you and older. 21% 27 9 18 25 are interested in (e.g. crossword) Buying each issue individually 14% 31 8 21 28 26 As active digital purchasers, unsurprisingly younger adults (ages Paying to rent an issue for a limited time (e.g., one day rental for a plane trip) 10% 20 9 20 41 18-34) find a multitude of payment options more appealing than the average reader, with two in three showing an affinity for social shopping to receive discounts and free access in exchange for 0% 100% referrals. Pay-per-article also resonates with Gen Y readers who Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 6] may prefer to just pay for what they actually read, and not for rehashed content they can get elsewhere for free.8 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • How important are the following features of digital or online newspapers and magazines? Very important Somewhat important Not very important Unsure Consumers value the freedom to read Anytime, anywhere access 48% 36 15 when they want, where they want. Can search the content 45% 41 13 Receive issue at same time print issue hits Features of digital newspapers and magazines that consumers the newsstand (e.g., no delays in delivery) 43% 41 15 find most important include anytime anywhere access (48%), Environmental friendliness 35% 45 19 search (45%), and timely delivery (43%) [Figure 7]. While it is too Rich media such as video and sound 28% 47 24 early to tell, “all-access” digital subscription plans that deliver Ability to share articles publications to all platforms (e.g., web, tablet, and smartphone), 26% 42 31(e.g., post a link on Facebook, email to a friend) such as that announced in February by Time Inc. and Sports Portability (e.g., can read on my iPad or mobile phone) 26% 37 25 36 Illustrated, could find favor with audiences. Can rate, review or “like” articles 18% 47 34 0% 100% Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 7]9 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • With regard to digital or online magazines and newspapers, how likely are you to pay for the following (if available)? Specialized content and back issues are Very likely Somewhat likely worth paying for. Not very likely Not at all likely Unsure When readers were asked what content they might be willing to pay for, in-depth information and expert advice (63%) and back- Ability to obtain in-depth information or expert advice on a topic of interest 26% 37 3 18 17 issue access (60%) [Figure 8] topped the list (and were found Access to back issues 23% 37 2 21 17 to be particularly important to university educated and younger readers, ages 18-34). Ability to read without ads 29% 31 2 21 17 The right to re-use the content in your own projects 17% 31 2 24 25 Despite their willingness to view ads in exchange for free access Games, products or services associated 17% 29 2 2829 23 [Figure 6], many consumers (60%) would consider paying to with the publicationWorkshops, events or educational courses view ad-free content [Figure 8]. This sentiment resonates most 13% 28 3 31 25 associated with the publication strongly with a younger demographic. Members of Gen Y show interest in publication-related games, products, and services as 0% 100% well; this demographic is significantly more likely than average to pay for these types of ancillary offerings. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 8]10 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Which of the following have you ever done as a result of seeing an ad in an online or digital newspaper or Digital newspaper and magazine ads are magazine? effective at driving purchase. Visited a website 55% Interactive ads in digital publications appear to be effective Entered a contest 36% at driving consideration and sales. While 18% of viewers had taken no action in response to an online or digital newspaper Gone to a store to see a product 32% or magazine ad, 36% had entered a contest, 31% had made Made a purchase 31% a purchase, and 20% had signed up for a trial [Figure 9]. Many Requested more information about a 25% others had taken steps toward a purchase decision, including product or service Signed up for a product/service trial visiting a website (55%), requesting more information about a 20% product or service (25%), and going to a store to view the item Forwarded the ad to someone 20% (32%). Printed it out to look at later 18%I have never done anything as a result of seeing an ad in an online or digital newspaper or magazine 18% With digital formats better able to capture reader attention and I have never seen an online or digital newspaper create a more engaging experience than static print ads—at 12% or magazine ad the same time as being more measurable and micro-targeted, advertisers have shifted their dollars away from print. However, 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% in a world of proprietary content and apps, it can be difficult for advertisers to deliver a large-scale campaign. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 9]11 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • How often do you do the following after reading an online or digital magazine or newspaper article? Members of Gen Y are keen to share their Very often Sometimes Rarely Never influence online. Tell someone about it face-to-face 23% 43 19 15 Social media, particularly Facebook, has changed the way we or on the phone interact with content. Most readers enjoy letting others know Email someone about it 14% 35 30 21 about articles they have read; two out of three (66%) regularly share information face-to-face or by phone, while half (49%) Rate or review the article 9% 25 31 34 do so via email [Figure 10]. Younger adults (ages 18-34) are particularly keen to share their influence online; members of Post a link to the article on Facebook,Twitter, or your personal blog or website 10% 23 22 46 Gen Y are more than three times as likely as older adults (55+) to post links to articles on social networks (59% vs. 16%), write Leave a comment for the author on the article page 9% 18 30 43 comments (43% vs. 14%), and rate or review articles (55% vs. 18%). Digital publishers who offer comprehensive social sharing and community tools, and make it easy to share, will directly 0% 100% benefit from an increased audience for their content. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 10]12 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Do you agree or disagree that copying and sharing online or digital newspaper or magazine content without permission is acceptable? Almost half of adults find copying and sharing without permission acceptable. Unsure, Strongly 14% agree, 17% Copying and sharing digital content without permission was found to be acceptable by 42% of adults [Figure 11], with only slight differences in attitudes among demographics. While younger consumers show a higher propensity to pay for Strongly publications [Figure 4], this group is also more likely to feel it is disagree, 24% Moderately acceptable to copy and share digital magazine and newspaper agree, 25% content without permission. The abundance of free, ad-supported news and magazine sites and apps has blurred the lines between copyrighted material Moderately and that in the public domain, while social sharing tools and disagree, 20% properties have fueled our interest and ability to share digital content with friends, family, and colleagues. Base: 1,010 US adult newspaper and/or magazine readers [Figure 11]13 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Recommendations Extend and synchronize access across multiple platforms.“The future of journalism belongs to the bold, and the companies that The appetite for digital content continues to grow as new technologiesprosper will be those that find new and better ways to meet the needs improve both convenience and the reading experience. Tablet reading inof their viewers, listeners, and readers.” particular has taken off, fueled by steadily rising iPad adoption. Magazine and newspaper publishers must find ways of serving up content to anRupert Murdoch before the US Federal Trade Commission ever-growing number of screens, ensuring the ability to synch reading across devices. Successful content offerings will follow the Netflix exampleNumerous newspaper and magazine publishers face a grim financial and show customers the same company through every channel or deviceoutlook due to dwindling subscribers and advertising revenue. Years of they own, but also optimize for each platform to deliver the best possiblediscounted subscriptions and free websites have accustomed consumers experience.to pay little or nothing for content, leading to lackluster responses to paidsubscriptions. Publishers need to innovate like never before to reach With so many devices on the market, media companies must planprospects and supplement advertising revenue with payments from users. investments carefully, starting with browser-based website optimization.Below are a few of the recommendations for action based on the results of Using the open web and HTML5 can help publishers maintain theirthis research: independence from Apple and Google. And those looking to create subscriptions bundling print, web, smartphone, and tablet access will find sites linked to developer-friendly ecommerce systems more flexible thanGet intimately familiar with prospects and in-app payment systems anyway.customers. Still, app stores can help users discover content. With the iPad expected to take 80% of the market this year iOS is a priority, but publishers shouldMany people, particularly younger adults, show willingness to pay for digital be cautious not to overinvest in applications. Since apps cost upwards ofmagazine and newspaper content, but most have not yet started doing $60,000, publishers must be certain expected benefits will outweigh buildso. Analog formats ported over to the digital realm have failed to create costs. Any app, whether free or paid, must offer consumers an incrediblycustomers. A sophisticated, multidimensional understanding of target high value proposition to inspire usage; even popular apps only reachaudiences is needed to craft user experiences and offerings that will attract hundreds of thousands of users rather than millions. Building re-usablepaying customers. User research, surveys, and analytics can help identify content elements to feed both the mobile web and multiple apps is a smartwho the best prospects are, what content and features they most value, way to go.which types of services or products they would pay for, what price pointsthey find attractive, and when they are likely to buy. Not only should publishers be cautious about build costs, but they should also be aware of in-app subscription terms that vary wildly in regardGaining a better understanding of how prospects value content in specific to customer data ownership, revenue share, and licensing restrictions.contexts will lead media companies to choose the right monetization Because they differ so much, publishers should take care to examine eachstrategies to acquire and retain customers, and help justify investments service independently.in content and functions based on their needs. The goal should not justbe to accumulate a bigger audience; publications must also foster a moreengaged audience to sustain themselves over the long haul.14 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • Create a differentiated experience that rewards with target audiences and then refine them iteratively. To be successful over the long haul, strategies that facilitate and reward frequent usage willinteraction. win out over others (like metered billing) that penalize the most engaged readers. Using monetization strategies in tandem can offer customers moreMost readers won’t pay for static content that rehashes what they can choice. Three of the more interesting models include:get elsewhere for free. While niche consumer or B2B publications (oftenclaimed as a work expense) will find this easier to do, every publisher • Free-mium/tiered subscriptions: Free-mium combines ad-supportedshould strive to differentiate their offerings by combining authoritative content with paid premium services. With Apple and Google bothinformation, exclusivity, and community in unique ways to generate interest announcing subscription payment services in February, thereand compel users to pay for access. Macworld has pursued this approach has been a renewed interest in monetizing digital content using awith its premium website, Macworld Insider, which provides an ad-free subscription model. Providing a layer of free access can eventuallysite layout, back issue access, full-content RSS feeds, a members-only entice readers into subscribing to paid services. The key is tonewsletter and forum, plus live chats with editors and writers. Embedding accommodate different audience segments with quality contenttools or services in content that allow it to be customized or personalized is they cannot get elsewhere. One company said to be doing wellanother way to raise engagement. with a tiered model (registered users only, subscribers only) is The Financial Times, which saw no loss in visitors or ad revenue whenSocial media, particularly Facebook, has changed the way we interact they put up their pay wall last year.with content. By adding social features such as reviews, comments,favorites, and recommendations, savvy publishers can deepen customer • Microtransactions: Several newspapers and magazines arerelationships and turn sharing from a liability into an important source of now considering offering individual articles or features à la carte,referrals. While it is still too early to tell if their efforts will be successful, The while some already allow paid one-day or one-week access. ByJournal Register is one newspaper company that is attempting to transform unbundling their content, publishers allow consumers to customizethe way it does business by using web-based tools to empower audiences and personalize information to make it more valuable to them.to help shape and participate in newsgathering. Another take on this model is the newspaper and magazine portal. Visitors sign up to a single micropayment system to access a wide selection of publications or content and have the flexibility of payingBe flexible in your approach to monetization by the article or by the day.models. • Marketplace: With this model, publishers make their content assets available to a developer community to build commercial and non-For the last decade, publishers have intensely debated whether or not commercial digital products and applications. By allowing theirconsumers will pay directly for newspaper and magazine content. While content to be used in new ways, magazines and newspapers canmost consumers have yet to make a purchase, many show willingness to speed innovation, build partnerships, and potentially monetize theirpay for access of some type—whether by the article, through all access content more easily than they could alone. The UK-based Guardianplans, or for ancillary services. is the first newspaper to offer a fully open API with tools for using their resources on other platforms and for integrating apps directlyWith few bona fide successes to look to for guidance, publishers must within their network.explore a variety of monetization strategies to find those that resonate best15 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com
    • About Elastic Path Elastic Path provides the industry’s most flexible enterprise ecommerce platform and strategic ecommerce consulting. We help innovative enterprises sell more digital goods and services in a way that is frictionless, social, and everywhere. Major global brands such as Symantec, Time Inc, and Virgin Media rely on Elastic Path to innovate and grow. Web www.elasticpath.com | Blog www.getelastic.com | Twitter www.twitter.com/elasticpath About the Author Amanda Dhalla is an ecommerce consultant with Elastic Path’s consulting division. A seasoned ecommerce professional with more than 12 years in the field, Amanda has hands-on experience marketing, merchandising, and managing multimillion dollar online stores. Her areas of specialization range from market research, conversion optimization, and analytics to traffic generation tactics such as social media, search engine optimization, and content marketing. Contact Us To find out how Elastic Path’s market research and ecommerce consulting services can help you succeed, please email consulting@elasticpath.com or call 1.800.942.5282 (toll-free within North America) or +1.604.408.8078 (outside North America). Methodology From February 18 to 22, 2011 Elastic Path Software hired Vision Critical, an interactive research solutions company, to conduct an online survey among a sample of 1,010 US adults over the age of 18 who had read at least one magazine or newspaper in the past month. Respondents had to have either read the magazine(s) or newspaper(s) in print, online (i.e., using a computer or mobile web browser), or via a dedicated applica- tion. The full dataset has been statistically weighted according to the most current region, gender, age, and education Census data to ensure a representative sample. The margin of error is ±3.1%, 19 times out of 20. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding. © Copyright 2011, Elastic Path Software Inc. All rights reserved. Elastic Path™ and the Elastic Path logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Elastic Path Software Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.16 The Future of Newspapers and Magazines in the Digital Era www.elasticpath.com