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This is a Paper about Autonomic computer

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    Autonomic computer Autonomic computer Document Transcript

    • Autonomic Computing in Wireless Sensor Networks 1 Jaffer Basha J#, 2Elanthendral.M # 1 Jafferbasha2001@gmail.com, 2thendral5320@gmail.com UG STUDENTS # Department of Computer Science and Engineering SREE Sowdambika College of engineering, ArruppukottaiAbstract— Wireless ad hoc networks of sensor nodes are The paper introduces Autonomic computing and wirelessenvisioned to be deployed in the physical environment to sensor network concepts. Discusses how the fundamentalmonitor a wide variety of real-world phenomena. Wireless properties of Autonomic computing comply with the basicsensor networks (WSN’s) are becoming popular in military design requirements for wireless sensor networks. Proposedand civilian applications such as surveillance, monitoring, protocols for Wireless Sensor Network and their applicabilitydisaster recovery, home automation and many others. Almost and suitability to Autonomic Wireless Sensor Networks andany sensor network application requires some form of self- required improvements. The paper gives brief overview ofconfiguration and autonomic functionality. Following IBM’s research projects and architectures for autonomicinitiatives towards Autonomic computing many architectures communication and networking which can be applied toand protocols for network self-organization and management WSNs. The last section focuses on the current and possiblehave been proposed and being implemented. future applications of Autonomic Wireless Sensor Networks. The paper presents concept of Autonomic Computing withrespect to Wireless Sensor Network. The paper introducesWireless sensor network basics, design goals and challenges II. AUTONOMIC COMPUTINGalong with current and future applications. It articulates A. Backgroundbasic needs of incorporating autonomic computing principlesinto the design of Wireless Sensor Networks. The paper also The dramatic increase in computing devices increasedoutlines recent contributions to Autonomic network computing capacity and complexity combined with popularityarchitectures, research projects, proposed architectures and of internet resulted in phenomenal growth in heterogeneousrouting protocols for Autonomic Wireless Sensor Networks. networks and network applications. With this increasing system complexity, network management issues and communication protocols are reaching a level beyond human ability to manage and secure so the stability of currentKeywords— Wireless sensor networks, Autonomic Computing, infrastructure, systems, and data is at an increasingly greaterAutonomic Wireless sensor networks, Service oriented architecture risk to suffer outages and general disrepair. Future network algorithms need to be adaptive, robust, and scalable with fully distributed and self-organizing architectures. Automation, I. INTRODUCTION self-protection and self management of wide spread networks Wireless sensor networks have critical applications in the may solve the problem till some extent.scientific, medical, commercial, and military domains. As the concept of self management rooted up, the mostExamples of these applications include environmental direct inspiration one can think of was the autonomic functionmonitoring, smart homes and offices, surveillance, and of the human central nervous system, where autonomicintelligent transportation systems. It also has significant controls use motor neurons to send indirect messages tousages in biomedical field. As social reliance on wireless organs at a sub-conscious level. These messages regulatesensor network technology increases, we can expect the size temperature, breathing, and heart rate without consciousand complexity of individual networks as well as the number thought. Observation and analysis of these complex adaptiveof networks to increase dramatically. systems found in nature became a major source of inspiration Wireless sensor networks are typically used in highly to design algorithms for self-managed, self-organized, self-dynamic, and hostile environments with no human existence configuring and self-protecting systems.(unlike conventional data networks), and therefore, they must Taking inspiration from autonomic nervous system of thebe tolerant to the failure and loss of connectivity of individual human body IBM created a foundation for autonomic systemsnodes. The sensor nodes should be intelligent to recover from by taking initiatives towards Autonomic Computing forfailures with minimum human involvement. Networks should relieving humans from the burden of managing computersupport process of autonomous formation of connectivity, systems which is growing enormously till the extent ofaddressing, and routing structures. Recent researches on unmanageability [1].Autonomic Networking can serve as basis for design ofAutonomic Wireless Sensor Networks. B. Autonomic System
    • Autonomic System is a system which works independently allocation techniques, security and management schemes needon predefined policies and rules without any human to be developed for autonomic elements, and a scalableinteraction and manage and configure itself on its own based management platform is required to coordinate the autonomicon predefined rules and gained knowledge over the time. IBM elements into a self-managing system.has defined the following four functional areas for selfmanagement of Autonomic System: [3]• Self-Configuration: Automatic configuration of components.• Self-Healing: Automatic discovery, and correction of faults.• Self-Optimization: Automatic monitoring and control of resources to ensure the optimal functioning with respect to the defined requirements.• Self-Protection: Proactive identification and protection from arbitrary attacksC. IBM Autonomic Computing Architecture Figure 2. Basic Architecture of Wireless Sensor Network IBM Autonomic Computing Architecture [2] defines anabstract information framework for self-managing IT systems.In the information framework, an autonomic system is a III. WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKcollection of autonomic elements. Each autonomic elementconsists of an autonomic manager (AM) and the managed A wireless sensor network (WSN) is a network that is maderesource (MR). The communication between the AM and the of hundreds or thousands of sensor nodes which are denselyMR is done through the MR’s management interfaces, which deployed in an unattended environment with the capabilitiesexposes two types of hooks, sensors and effectors. The of sensing, wireless communications and computations (i.e.sensors are used by the AM to obtain the internal state of the collecting and disseminating environmental data). TheseMR, and the effectors are used by the AM to change the spatially distributed autonomous devices cooperativelybehaviour of the MR. The AM enables self-management of monitor physical and environmental conditions, such asthe resource using a ‘‘monitoring, analysis, planning, and temperature, sound, vibration, pressure, motion or pollutants,execution’’ control loop, with supporting knowledge of the at different locations. The basic architecture of Wirelesscomputing environment, management policies, and some sensor Network is shown in Figure2.other related considerations. Figure 3. Components of a Sensor Node (Ref [04]) Each autonomic node in a sensor network is typically Figure 1. Basic Autonomic Computing Reference Architecture equipped with a radio transceiver or other wireless communications device, a processing unit which can be a The autonomic computing information model only provides small micro-controller, sensing unit, and an energy source,the conceptual guidance on designing self-managed systems; usually an alkaline battery. Sometimes, a mobilizer is neededin practice, the information model needs to be mapped to an to move sensor node from current position and carry out theimplementable management and control architecture for assigned tasks. Since the sensor may be mobile, the baseAutonomic Networks. Specifically, measurement techniques, station may require accurate location of the node which isrule engines, planning methodologies, dynamic resource
    • done by location finding system. The size of a single sensor some applications may require a faster communicationnode can vary from shoebox-sized nodes down to devices the and instant response. Routing algorithms should besize of grain of dust. [4] intelligent to choose minimum hop and minimum distance paths for data transfer. [7] • Management challenge – Managing the communicationA. Requirements and Design factors in WSN over heterogeneous networks is basic challenge in self- Following are some of the basic requirements and design managed system because policies and communicationfactors of wireless sensor network which serve as guidelines protocols plan an important role in networkfor development of protocols and algorithms for WSN communication. Also, it is necessary to balance the levelcommunication architecture. of detail the network is providing to the client against the• Fault Tolerance, Adaptability and Reliability: Sensor rate at which energy is being consumed while gathering networks are required to operate through adapting to the the data. Clearly, it is preferable to have the network environmental changes that sensors monitor. The automatically do this tuning, rather than requiring manual networks should be self-learning. Reliability is the ability intervention. to maintain the sensor network functionalities without any interruption due to sensor node failure. Sensor node may These basic requirements and design goals serve as fail due to lack of energy, physical damage, challenge for current technology. Though current IP routing communications problem, inactivity, or environmental protocol exist and have significant applications in current interference. The network should be able to detect failure networks and Internet, they do not satisfy complete design of a node and organize itself, reconfigure and recover requirements in Wireless sensor networks because WSN from node failures without loosing any information. [5] nodes typically has limited computing capacities and less• Power Consumption and Power management: One of the power. So WSN’s require a different infrastructure and components of sensor nodes is the power source which protocol stack which can be implemented using autonomic can be a battery. The wireless sensor node being a computing concept as we will discuss in next section. microelectronic device, can only be equipped with a limited power source [4]. Over the remote inaccessible place with less human control and existence, power IV. WSN AND AUTONOMIC COMPUTING sources play critical role in survival of sensor nodes. To clarify the contribution that autonomic computing can Power source should be intelligently divided over bring to Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN), let’s examine how sensing, computation, and communications phases as per WSN design requirements and operations can be tackled using requirement. Sensors can be hibernated when inactive. autonomic principles. Lots of current researches are focusing on designing As discussed above, there can be sensor nodes which are power-aware protocols and algorithms for wireless sensor moving and can change their position dynamically or even networks. Recently, solar energy is also considered as an leave the network coverage area. Therefore, a pre- option for empowering remote sensor nodes which are programmed configuration for the network will not work. exposed environment. Self-configuring nodes can set up network connections,• Network Efficiency and Data Aggregation: Flooding raw evaluate if there are any gaps in the WSN and replace a sensed data over the network can easily congest the moved or dead node in the network. Since sensors can be network. Some critical applications like intruder deployed in an unattended area (e.g., forest and ocean) or detectors require urgent transmission and faster physically unreachable area (e.g., inside a building wall), they processing of data which may degrade performance and are required to operate with the minimum aid from base loose reliability due to congestion or latency in the stations or human administrators. Although majority of network. Intelligent aggregation of sensed data and current sensor application have already considered this in their elimination of unwanted and redundant information and network design, there is still a need for WSN to have the data compression can be a solution for efficient resource ability to reconfigure and recover itself without too much and energy utilization and congestion avoidance. Many human intervene, especially in inaccessible environment. [4,5] algorithms like directed diffusion [6] are proposed to Sensor reading usually contains some noises; it may be a facilitate data aggregation and dissemination within the false positive due to malfunction of sensors. Sensors are context of WSNs. required to collectively self-heal (i.e., detect and eliminate)• Intelligent Routing: In many applications, sensor nodes false positives in their sensor readings instead of transmitting are moving nodes and can change place dynamically. them to base stations. This can also reduce power Routing protocols must be adaptive to these changes and consumption of sensors because data processing within the should be self-healing and self-configuring. The sensor incurs much less power consumption than data information should be persistent in spite of changes in transmission does [7]. network nodes. Low processing capacity of a node creates Sensor nodes are generally exposed to much harsher many challenges for routing packets throughout the conditions than standard computing equipment, and are thus neighbouring nodes intelligently. As discussed above, subject to energy depletion and incidental damage. Battery
    • failure can result in lost sensor node. This leads to a gradual Service-oriented architecture [14] is an approach to builddegradation of the network as individual nodes are lost. distributed systems that deliver application functionality asNetwork paths break and gaps appear in the coverage area. A services to end-user applications or to build other services. ItWSN needs to adapt to the changes, recover from losses and decomposes the design of large complex application, andbe self-protected. This can be achieved by renegotiating middleware architecture into various reusable services ornetwork routes, monitoring voltage levels within sensor node, function units. In SOA the service requester has no knowledgecontrolling each node by an agent or base station and upon of the technical details of the provider’s implementation, suchfailure activating redundant nodes to replace damaged ones, or as the programming language, deployment platform, and soby informing some higher-level entity which can provide forth. The service requester typically invokes operations byassistance. way of messages -- a request message and the response -- As discussed in requirements, maximum efficiency needs rather than through the use of APIs or file formats. Thus, theto be gained from the available energy as the available energy application developers only need to concern the operationalat each sensor node is limited. Sensing, Processing and data description of the service which allows software on each sidetransfer phases require lot of energy so each node should be of the conversation to change without impacting the other.able to sense process and transfer data intelligently hence self-optimization is an important trait for WSN protocols. Energysavings can be achieved by putting the nodes into a low powersleep mode, ready to be reactivated when the need arises. Forexample, sensors may decrease their duty cycles when there isno significant change in their sensor readings. This results inless power consumption in the sensors. Also, whenneighboring sensors report environmental changes, a sensormay draw inference from the reports and increase its dutycycle to be more watchful for a potential local environmentalchange in the future. However, there exists a trade-off in thatthe computational cost of a globally-optimal solution such asthis is often computationally intractable, whether by 8-bitnodes or 64-bit base-stations. All basic WSN self-management principles comply withthe concept of autonomic computing. So IBM autonomiccomputing principles can be applied to wireless sensornetworks to get the desired functionality in vastly growing Figure 4. Basic Model of MANNA Architecture (Ref [19])sensor network applications. So far, the implementation and design of SOA is mostly dependent on Web Services with standardized web V. AUTONOMIC WSN MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE technologies such as WSDL, OGSA. As a result, it is not As discussed in section 2.3, the basic Autonomic directly applicable to all of those complex technologies onComputing model only provides the conceptual guidance on those resource-constrained sensor nodes. MANNA [12] hasdesigning self-managed systems and needs to be mapped to an presented some initial ideas of using the concept of serviceimplementable management and control architecture for semantics from SOA.Autonomic Networks. An architecture for Autonomic In MANNA, all the management function units sit at thecommunication and networking is an area of research lately lowest level of management architecture. They are designedand many architectures are proposed and being developed. All with specific implementation for individual objectives inthese architectures aim to produce an architectural design that consideration of unique features of WSN. A service, at the topenables flexible, dynamic and fully autonomic formation of layer, can use one or more of those management functions.large-scale networks in which the functionalities of each Different services can share the same functions, but stillconstituent network node are also composed in an autonomic concern each individual given aspect based on the polices andfashion. Moreover, these architectures also support mobile network state obtained from WSN models. The basic model ofnodes and multiple administrative domains so these can be MANNA architecture is as shown in figure 4 [12].applied to wireless sensor networks for achieving desired Furthermore, SOA can specially deal with WSN uniquegoals and meet above mention challenges.Following is the aspects such heterogeneity, mobility and adaptation, andbrief discussion of some visions for the design of an efficient offers seamless management integration in the wirelessmanagement architecture for WSNs based on top of the basic environments. Although the special features of SOA areautonomic computing architecture. marvellous, there is still a large amount of research challenge needed to address before the concepts of SOA can beA. Service-Oriented Architecture appropriately applied into WSNs.
    • B. Policy Based Architecture Here is a brief overview of the current research projects Policy-based management has presented its robust ability to based on Architecture for Autonomic Networksupport designing of self-adaptive decentralized management communication and Self-Management which will serve asservice in WSNs. Davy S. et al. [13] proposed an autonomic guidelines for Autonomic WSN’s and will bring revolution tocommunications architecture that manages complexity WSN’s and its applications.through policy-based management by incorporating a shared A. Bisoninformation model integrated with knowledge-basedreasoning mechanisms to provide self-governing behaviour. BISON was a three-year project funded by the European The architecture is organized using four distinct Commission. BISON aimed confronting the complexityarchitectural constructs i.e. Shared Information, Virtual explosion problem by building robust Network InformationSoftware, Infrastructure and Policy as shown in figure 5.The Systems that are self-organizing and self-repairing.shared information over the network is managed through avirtual software which support autonomic functionality for BISON developed techniques and tools for building robust,different heterogeneous networks and components combined self-organizing and adaptive Network Information System aswith network infrastructure which include network elements ensembles of autonomous agents by drawing inspiration fromand other computing devices. All these three modules are biological processes and mechanisms like ant colonies forgoverned by policy module. [13] routing in overlay networks using swarm intelligence, lifecycle of Dictyostelium for load balancing, epidemics for aggregation and immune system for search. BISON explored the use of ideas derived from complex adaptive systems (CAS) to enable the construction of robust and self-organizing information systems for deployment in highly dynamic network environments. The project proposed solutions to important problems arising in overlay networks and mobile ad-hoc networks by developing algorithms for routing in mobile ad-hoc networks, topology control in sensor networks along with data aggregation and content search algorithms for peer to peer networks. [15] B. ANA (Autonomic Network Architecture) ANA framework is built on the objective to provide an architectural framework that allows the accommodation of and communication between various networks, ranging from small scale Personal Area Networks, through (Mobile) Ad hoc Networks and special purpose networks such as Sensor Networks, to global scale networks, in particular the Internet. Figure 5. Proposed Policy Based Autonomic Architecture ANA framework specifies how networks interact. This model is based on three important concepts ofautonomic computing: (1) the sharing and reusing of commoninformation and knowledge, (2) the application of machinelearning and knowledge-based reasoning to guide the changesin behaviour of the system, and (3) an extensible and flexiblegovernance model that forms a closed control loop that learnsfrom its decisions. Similarly, in MANNA [12], policies describe a set ofdesired behaviours of management components (e.g. managerand agent) for indicating the real-time operations. Based onpolices, managers and agents can interact with each other in acooperative fashion to achieve a desired overall managementgoal such as form groups of nodes, control network density,and keep the coverage of the WSN area. Figure 6. ANA Framework and Network compartments VI. BRIEF OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH PROJECTS ON AUTONOMIC NETWORKS ANA introduces the core concept of "network compartments." The compartment abstraction allows
    • atomization or decomposition of communication systems and VII.APPLICATIONS AND FUTURE WORKnetworks into smaller and more easily manageable units. For The applications for WSNs are many and varied. They areexample, compartments will allow decomposition of today’s used in commercial and industrial applications to monitor dataglobal IP network into appropriate sub-networks, which can that would be difficult or expensive to monitor using wiredbe managed more autonomously from the overall network sensors. Typical applications of WSNs include monitoring,(e.g., a different addressing or routing scheme can be applied tracking, and controlling. Some of the specific applications areinside each compartment). [8] habitat monitoring, object tracking, nuclear reactor A (network) compartment implements the operational controlling, fire detection, traffic monitoring and so on.rules and administrative policies for a given communicationcontext. Compartments typically perform functions like 1) Wireless sensor networks are currently being used forregistration and degradation, policy enforcement, identifier intrusion detection by forming a perimeter around a securemanagement and resolution and Routing. area and monitoring the progression of intruders (passing Addressing and naming are left to compartments. The information from one node to the next). WSN’s could bemain advantages of this approach are:No need to impose a further deployed in Military applications such as hostileunique way to resolve names and manage a unique global tracking and surveillance, spy monitoring.addressing scheme. It is open to future addressing and naming 2) Other major current application of WSN includeschemes. environment monitoring and applications such as animal tracking, flood detection and weather prediction andC. Haggle forecasting and commercial applications like seismic activities monitoring and prediction. Many weather Haggle is a new autonomic networking architecture forecasting websites use WSN technology for retrievingdesigned to enable communication in the presence of weather details in remote inhibited areas. [16]intermittent network connectivity, which exploits autonomicopportunistic communications (i.e., in the absence of end-to- 3) WSN’s are used widely in automation and control andend communication infrastructures). Haggle node architecture Artificial intelligence applications like Robotics.takes inspiration from human communication model. [9] 4) Sensor networks are increasingly being used in Health The main components of Haggle are: applications for monitoring changes in patient’s health,• A revolutionary paradigm for autonomic behaviour and heart rate. communication, based on advanced local forwarding and 5) Resent research project at Wayne State University and the sensitive to realistic human mobility Kresge Eye Institute developed artificial retina using• A simple and powerful architecture oriented to Wireless Biomedical sensors. The project aimed to build a opportunistic message relaying, and based on privacy, chronically implanted artificial retina with sufficient visual authentication, trust and advanced data handling functionality to allow persons without vision or with• An open environment for the easy proliferation of limited vision to “see” at an acceptable level. [11] applications and services. 6) Moreover, this Wireless biomedical sensor technology can be effectively used to treat diabetes, by providing a moreD. CASCADAS consistent, accurate, and less invasive method for CASCADAS (Component-ware for Autonomic Situation- monitoring glucose levels. Currently, to monitor bloodaware Communications, and Dynamically Adaptable glucose levels, a lancet is used to prick a finger; a drop ofServices) is an ongoing project like ANA and Haggle. blood is placed on a test strip, which is analyzed either The overall goal of CASCADAS is identifying, manually or electronically. This constant pricking severaldeveloping, and evaluating architectures and solutions based times a day over a period of years can damage the tissueon a general-purpose component model for autonomic and blood vessels in that area. As proposed by Schwiebertcommunication services; specifically in such context et al. [11], Wireless biomedical sensors could be implantedautonomic service components autonomously achieve self- in the patient once. The sensor would monitor the glucoseorganization and self-adaptation towards the provision of levels and transmit the results to a wristwatch display.adaptive and situated communication-intensive services. 7) Wireless biomedical sensors may play a key role in early detection of Cancer. As discussed in [11], cancer cells CASACDAS approach is based on four key scientific exude nitric oxide, which affects the blood flow in the areaprinciples i.e. situation awareness, semantic self organization, surrounding a tumor. A sensor with the ability to detectself similarity and Autonomic component awareness around these changes in the blood flow can be placed in suspectwhich the future communication services infrastructures locations. It is likely that any abnormalities could beshould be designed and built. [10] detected much sooner with the sensors than without.
    • 8) RFID, video and various kinds of embedded sensors can Available from WWW: http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/intanagonwiwat00directed.html be used to track and monitor the patient in their everyday [7] OHare G.M.P., OGrady M.J., D. Marsh, Ruzzelli A. G. and Tynan R. activities. This information can be processed and relayed “Autonomic Wireless Sensor Networks: Intelligent. Ubiquitous to medical personnel. Patients routine can be assembled Sensing” Available from WWW: www.cs.ucd.ie/csprism/publications/ over the period of time and deviations from this may be pub2006/ANIPLA06.pdf [8] ANA: Autonomic Network Architecture Project. http://www.ana- recognized and analyzed. project.org/ [9] Haggle Project. http://www.haggleproject.org [10] CASCADAS project. http://www.cascadas-project.org VIII.CONCLUSIONS [11] Schwiebert L., Gupta S., Weinmann J., “Research Challenges in Wireless Networks of Biomedical Sensors” in proceedings of the 7th annual international conference on Mobile computing and networking. Wireless Sensor Network technology offers significant Available from WWW: http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=381692potential in numerous application domains. Given the diverse [12] Linnyer Beatrys Ruiz, J.M.S.N., Antonio A.F. Loureiro, “MANNA: A Management Architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks.” IEEEnature of these domains, it is essential that WSNs perform in a Communications Magazine, 2003. 41(2): p. 116-125. Available fromreliable and robust fashion. I believe, wireless sensor network WWW: http://www.lisha.ufsc.br/~lucas/docs/Ruiz-2003.pdfhas proved its usage in the future distributed computing [13] Davy S. et al. “Policy-Based Architecture to Enable Autonomicenvironment. However, there are significant amount of Communications”. Available from WWW: http://techpubs.motorola.com/download/IPCOM000141400D/IPCOM0technical challenges and design issues those needs to be 00141400D.pdfaddressed. One of the biggest challenges is the designing of [14] Colan, M. Service-Oriented Architecture expands the vision of Webefficient network management architecture to continuously services, Part 1. June, 2004 Available from WWW:support WSNs for providing services for various sensor http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/library/ws-soaintro.html [15] Gianni A., Di Caro, Frederick Ducatelle, Luca M. Gambardella,applications. The unique features of WSNs make the design “BISON: Biology-Inspired techniques for Self-Organization inand implementation of such management architecture dynamic Networks” Available from WWW:different enough from the traditional networks which can be http://www.idsia.ch/~frederick/bison.pdf [16] Wireless Sensor Networks Wiki.satisfied by concept of Autonomic Computing. There is still http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_sensor_networkno particular generic network management architecture sotaking inspiration from IBMs Autonomic Computing conceptand Biological neural network system many different researchprojects are currently being executed. In this paper, we discussed concepts of Autonomiccomputing, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN’s). Designcriteria for WSN and how it matches basic Autonomicprinciples. Then we overviewed few architectures and routingprotocols suitable for WSN and ongoing research work ofAutonomic communication and network managementarchitectures which can be applied to WSNs. Finally, wesummarized some of the WSN applications along with futureusages. REFERENCES[1] P. Horn, “Autonomic Computing: IBMs Perspective on the State of Information Technology”, Oct. 2001. Available from the World Wide Web (WWW): http://www.research.ibm.com/autonomic/[2] IBM and autonomic computing, “An architectural blueprint for autonomic computing,” April 2003. Available from the WWW: http:// www-03.ibm.com/autonomic/pdfs/ACwpFinal.pdf[3] Kephart J, and Chess D, “The Vision of Autonomic Computing” Computer Magazine, IEEE, 2003. Available from WWW: http://www.research.ibm.com/autonomic/research/papers/AC_Vision_ Computer_Jan_2003.pdf[4] I. Akyildiz, W. Su, Y. Sankarasubramaniam, and E. Cayirci, ”A survey on Sensor Networks,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 40, Issue: 8, pp. 102-114, August 2002. Available from WWW: http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/akyildiz02survey.html[5] Yu Mengjie, Mokhtar H., Merabti M., “A Survey of Network Management Architecture in Wireless Sensor Network” Available from WWW: www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/senman/Papers/2006-093.pdf[6] C. Intanagonwiwat, R. Govindan, D. Estrin, J. Heidemann, and F. Silva, ”Directed Diffusion for Wireless Sensor Networking,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, vol. 11, pp. 2-16, Feb. 2003.