Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Herm un1a
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Herm un1a

841

Published on

Based on Grasping God's Word (3rd ed), it covers "the interpretive journey" (chap 2) .

Based on Grasping God's Word (3rd ed), it covers "the interpretive journey" (chap 2) .

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
841
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Much can be said in response to the question, “why do we have to interpret the Bible?” but at this point I will say two things. First, interpretation is unavoidable. Whenever you think about the meaning of any passage you are already involved in interpretation. Second, for followers of Christ, interpreting the Bible is important because if we believe the Bible is God’s word, we want to understand it and apply it correctly.
  • It basically consists in a person reading a passage of scripture and whatever the person feels is the meaning is taken to be the meaning. A good example is someone who reads Lev 19:8 which says that you shall not make any tattoo for yourselves. Someone following this approach will read the verse and immediately conclude that tattoos are a violation of God’s law for Christians. The problem with this interpretation is the person does not take into account the differences in covenant and the kind of regulation that is being promoted here. ( Illustration from West Wing ): s Point 1: Dr. Jacobs is not a biblical scholar; rather, she is student of English Literature, yet she is still expected to know how to interpret Scripture. Point 2: Dr. Jacobs says, “I don’t say homosexuality is an abomination, Mr. President, the Bible does.” This statement reveals her intuitive approach. The weakness of this approach is demonstrated by her inability to mount any response to the President’s queries regarding Exodus 21:7, Exodus 35:2 or Leviticus 11:7. If Dr. Jacobs would have applied a spiritualizing approach, then she would be disregarding the very concrete nature that these injunctions address. And, she didn’t have the option of ignoring these difficult texts, because she is getting asked these questions by the President. We must have a consistent approach that grasps the original meaning, then attempts to apply this meaning by accounting for cultural differences and formulating a theological principle
  • This approach basically tries to find some hidden meaning that lies behind the story or statements in the text. For example, recall that in the story of David vs Goliath, David took five stones. Suppose I say that each stone represents one fruit of the spirit: joy, peach, love, patience and hope. And then I say that we these “stones” we will be able to defeat the giants in our lives. Well, it sounds good but it is a terrible interpretation of the passage. The problem with this approach is that it is very subjective. One person may say that the stones mean one thing, while someone else says that it means something totally different. It seems that this approach enables the person to create whatever meaning heshe wants to find in a text.
  • Clearly this is a position that no true follower of Christ will want to take.
  • Above is a pictorial representation of our consistent approach to biblical interpretation. We call it the Interpretative Journey. There are 5 steps on this journey: Grasping the Text in Their Town Measuring the Width of the River to Cross Crossing the Principlizing Bridge Consult the Biblical Map Grasping the Text in Our Town By embarking on this journey we commit to the goal of grasping the meaning of text. We do not create meaning out of a text; rather, we seek to find the meaning that is already there.
  • The synthesis statement should use past tense verbs and refer to the biblical audience.
  • Students often get bogged down in the common differences that possibly have little impact on the interpretation of a passage. It is important for them to realize that to take the Interpretative Journey means that we must account for the unique set of differences that we find in any given text.
  • Above is a list of 5 criteria that describe a good theological principle.
  • (Note: if anyone uses the 2 nd edition of the textbook, you will note that this principle is not there. The 2 nd ed., gives you 4 steps rather than 5. But this is a welcome improvement because when we interpret scripture we need to make sure our interpretation is consistent with the message of scripture as a whole. Point 1 describes the parts-whole spiral. Point 2 forces us to ask if the New Testament adds to or modifies our principle.
  • This step moves an abstract principle to concrete application.
  • Above is a pictorial representation of our consistent approach to biblical interpretation. We call it the Interpretative Journey. There are 5 steps on this journey: Grasping the Text in Their Town Measuring the Width of the River to Cross Crossing the Principlizing Bridge Consult the Biblical Map Grasping the Text in Our Town By embarking on this journey we commit to the goal of grasping the meaning of text. We do not create meaning out of a text; rather, we seek to find the meaning that is already there.
  • The example given in the textbook is Joshua 1: 1-9. Please read this and see how each of the steps are carried out.
  • This does not deny that God used human beings in the process of writing the Bible. The point though is that God through the HS inspired the authors of scripture in such a way that what they wrote ends up being an accurate record of God’s revelation. This is a very important point since it tends to go against the trend in many contemporary approaches to interpreting the Bible. Later in the semester we will deal with questions of how to apply the meaning of scripture to us today. But at this point it is important to say that even though every book in the Bible was written to some specific audience and situation, the basic truths and theological principles still apply to us today. Thus, in 2 Chron 32, king Hezekiah faced a possible invasion by the Assyrians. He responded to this threat by trusting God and listening to the word of the prophet Isaiah. It’s obvious that the church today has no kings nor do we face such a threat. But notice that the basic theological principle that Hezekiah trust and depended on God in a situation of crisis is still applicable to us today just as much as it was back then.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Interpretive Journey• Introduction – Grasping God’s Word is for people who want to understand the Bible at a deeper level. – Why do we have to interpret the Bible?¹ – The process of interpreting and applying the Bible may be compared to taking a journey. – There is a river of differences separating us from the biblical audience—culture, language, time, situation, and covenant.
    • 2. How can we cross the river? Intuitive or“feels-right” approach
    • 3. How can we cross the river?Spiritualizing approach
    • 4. How can we cross the river?Get discouraged and give up
    • 5. Basics of the Journey
    • 6. Basics of the JourneyCompleting Step 1•Read the text carefully and makeobservations.•Study the historical and literary context.•Synthesize the meaning of the passage forthe biblical audience.
    • 7. Basics of the JourneyStep 2: Measuringthe Width of theRiver to CrossQuestion: What arethe differencesbetween the biblicalaudience and us?
    • 8. Basics of the JourneyCompleting Step 2•Account for common differences: culture,language situation, time and covenant.•Focus on the unique differences found in aspecific text.•If you are studying an Old Testamentpassage, you must account for the life andwork of Jesus Christ.
    • 9. Basics of the JourneyCompleting Step 3•Recall the differences identified in Step 2.•Identify any similarities between the biblicalaudience and contemporary life.•Holding the differences and similaritiestogether, identify a broad theologicalprinciple.•Write out the theological principle, usingpresent tense verbs.
    • 10. Basics of the JourneyA theological principle should…•be reflected in the text.•be timeless and not tied to a specificsituation.•not be culturally bound.•correspond to the teaching of the rest ofScripture.•be relevant to both the biblical andcontemporary audience.
    • 11. Basics of the JourneyStep 4: Consult theBiblical MapQuestion: How doesour theologicalprinciple fit with therest of the Bible?
    • 12. Basics of the JourneyCompleting Step 4•Does this principle correlate with the rest ofthe Bible?•If in the Old Testament, run yourtheological principle through the grid of theNew Testament.
    • 13. Basics of the JourneyStep 5: Grasping the Text in Our TownQuestion: How should individual Christianstoday live out the theological principles?
    • 14. Basics of the Journey
    • 15. Basics of the JourneyCompleting Step 5•Apply the theological principle to thespecific situation of a contemporaryChristian.•There are numerous applicationalpossibilities, because Christians today findthemselves in a variety of situations.
    • 16. • Basics of the Journey – Assumptions: • The Bible is God’s communication of himself and his will to us.¹ • We do not create meaning; rather, we seek to discover the meaning that is already in the Bible.² • Theological principles revealed in specific passages of the Bible are applicable to both the biblical audience and to Christians today.³ • We can use the principilizing bridge to cross the river of differences.

    ×