Government of Indian Important Schemes 2012-13
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This eBook is about Government of India important schemes 2012-13. ...

This eBook is about Government of India important schemes 2012-13.
It covers following topics :

Rajiv Gandhi Equity Saving Scheme

Rashtriya Bal Swaasthya Karyakram

Rashtriya Gram Swaraj Yojana

Mid Day Meal Scheme

Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan

Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojna

Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission

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Government of Indian Important Schemes 2012-13 Government of Indian Important Schemes 2012-13 Document Transcript

  • Government of India Important Schemes 2012-13 eBook Developed ByA site for Current Affairs & General Studies
  • Table of ContentsRajiv Gandhi Equity Saving Scheme........................................................................................ 2Rashtriya Bal Swaasthya Karyakram ...................................................................................... 3Rashtriya Gram Swaraj Yojana ................................................................................................. 7Mid Day Meal Scheme ................................................................................................................... 9Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA)................................................................................................... 11Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojna (RSBY) ............................................................................. 14Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) ............................ 15Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Rajiv Gandhi Equity Saving SchemeThe Union Budget 2013-14 has proposed to liberalise the Rajiv Gandhi Equity SavingsScheme (RGESS) to enable first time investors to park funds in Mutual Funds (MFs) andlisted shares and extended tax benefits to three successive years. Also, the limit for investorswanting to invest in RGESS has been raised to Rs 12 lakh from Rs 10 lakh earlier.The RGESS, which was originally announced in the Budget for 2012-13, seeks to provide taxbenefits to first time investors in stock markets. The basic idea of the RGESS scheme is toincrease investor participation in equities.Salient features of the scheme are as follows:  The maximum investment permissible under RGESS is Rs 50,000 and investors get a 50 per cent deduction of the amount invested from the taxable income for the year.  Deduction under the scheme has now been expanded to cover investments in listed units of equity oriented funds.  The scheme is open to new retail investors identified on the basis of their permanent account numbers (PAN).  The tax deduction allowed will be over and above the Rs 1 lakh limit permitted allowed under Section 80 C of the Income Tax Act.  In addition to the 50 per cent tax deduction for investments, dividend income is also tax free.  Stocks listed under BSE 100 or CNX 100, or stocks of public-sector undertakings (PSUs) that are Navratnas, Maharatnas, and Miniratnas will be eligible under the scheme. Follow-on public offers (FPOs) of these companies will also be eligible.  IPOs of PSUs, which are scheduled to get listed in the relevant financial year and whose annual turnover is not less than Rs 4,000 crore for each of the immediate past three years, will also be eligible.  Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and MFs that have RGESS-eligible securities as their underlying and are listed and traded in the stock exchanges and settled through a depository mechanism have also been brought under the RGESS to provide the advantage of diversification and consequent risk minimization.  To benefit the small investors, investments are allowed in instalments in the year in which tax claims are made.  The total lock-in period for investments will be three years including an initial blanket lock-in of one year.  After the first year, investors will be allowed to trade in the securities. Investors are free to trade / churn their portfolios for around 90 days in each of the years following the first year of investment.  Investors would, however, be required to maintain their level of investment during these two years at the amount for which they have claimed income tax benefit or at the value of the portfolio before initiating a sale transaction, whichever is less, for at least 270 days in a year.  The general principle under which trading is allowed is that whatever is the value of stocks / units sold by the investor from the RGESS portfolio, RGESS-compliant securities of at least the same value are credited back into the account subsequently. However, the investor is allowed to take benefit of the appreciation of his RGESS portfolio, provided its value remains above the investment for which he has claimed income tax benefit.  In case the investor fails to meet the conditions stipulated, the tax benefit will be withdrawn. The broad provisions of the Scheme and the income tax benefits under it have already been incorporated as a new Section-80CCG- of the Income Tax Act.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Rashtriya Bal Swaasthya Karyakram (A New Preventive Health Care Initiative)The newly launched Rashtriya Bal Swaasthya Karyakram of the Ministry of Health & FamilyWelfare assures a package of health services for children up to 18 years of age.The initiative, which is part of the National Rural Health Mission, was launched onFebruary 6, in Palghar, a tribal dominated block of Thane district in Maharashtra, by UPAChairperson Sonia Gandhi, in the presence of Union Health & Family Welfare MinisterGhulam Nabi Azad and Maharashtra Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan. The programme willbe extended to cover all districts of the country in a phased manner.Early Detection; Early InterventionRashtriya Bal Swaasthya Karyakram, also known as Child Health Screening and EarlyIntervention Services aims at early detection and management of ‘4Ds’ prevalent inchildren. These are Defects at birth, Diseases in children, Deficiency conditions andDevelopmental delays including Disabilities. The health screening of children is a knownintervention under School Health Programme. It is now being expanded to cover all childrenfrom birth to 18 years of age. The services aim to cover all children of 0-6 years of age group in rural areas and urbanslums, in addition to children enrolled in classes 1st to 12th in Government and Governmentaided schools. A set of 30 common ailments / health conditions have been identified forscreening and early intervention.Defects at BirthGlobally, about 7.9 million children are born annually with a serious birth defect of geneticor partially genetic origin which account for 6 percent of the total births. In India about 1.7million babies are born with birth defects annually. For those who do not receive specificand timely intervention and yet survive, these disorders can cause irreversible life-longmental, physical, auditory or visual disability.DeficienciesAnaemia prevalence has been reported as high as 70% amongst under-five children largelydue to iron deficiency. The situation has remained virtually unchanged over the past decade.Almost half of children under age five years (48 %) are chronically malnourished. Duringpre-school years, children continue to suffer from adverse effects of anaemia, malnutritionand developmental disabilities, which ultimately also impact their performance in school.DiseasesThe prevalence of dental caries varies between 50-60 percent among Indian school childrenas reported in different surveys. Rheumatic heart disease is reported at 1.5 per thousandamong school children in the age group of 5-9 years. The median prevalence of reactive airway disease including asthma among children is reported to be 4.75 percent.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Developmental DelaysGlobally, 200 million children do not reach their developmental potential in the first fiveyears because of poverty, poor health, nutrition and lack of early stimulation. The prevalenceof early childhood stunting and the number of people living in absolute poverty could beused as proxy indicators of poor development in under five children. Both of these indicatorsare closely associated with poor cognitive and educational performance in children andfailure to reach optimum developmental potential.Defects at Birth  Neural tube defect  Down’s Syndrome  Cleft Lip & Palate/Cleft palate alone#  Talipes (club foot)  Developmental dysplasia of the hip  Congenital cataract  Congenital deafness  Congenital heart diseases  Retinopathy of PrematurityDeficiencies  Anaemia especially Severe anaemia  Vitamin A deficiency (Bitot spot)  Vitamin D Deficiency, (Rickets)  Severe Acute Malnutrition  GoitreChild hood Diseases  Skin conditions (Scabies, fungal infection and Eczema)  Otitis Media  Rheumatic heart disease  Reactive airway disease  Dental caries  Convulsive disordersDevelopmental delays and Disabilities  Vision Impairment  Hearing Impairment  Neuro-motor Impairment  Motor delay  Cognitive delay  Language delay  Behaviour disorder (Autism)  Learning disorder  Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder  Congenital Hypothyroidism, Sickle cell anaemia, Beta thalassemia (Optional)Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Implementation MechanismFacility Based Newborn ScreeningThis includes screening of birth defects in institutional deliveries at public health facilities,especially at the designated delivery points by nurses, medical officers/gynaecologists.Community Based Newborn ScreeningAccredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) during home visits for newborn care will use theopportunity to screen the babies born at home and the institutions till6 weeks of age. ASHAswill be trained with simple tools for detecting gross birth defects. For performing this task,ASHA would be provided with a tool kit consisting of a pictorial reference book with self-explanatory pictures for identification of birth defects.Screening at Anganwadi Centres and SchoolsThe children in the age groups 6weeks to 6 years of age will be examined in the Anganwadicentres by the dedicated mobile health teams. The children in the age groups 6 to 18 yearswill be screened in Government and Government aided schools. The screening of children inthe anganwadi centres would be conducted at least twice a year and at least once a year forschool children to begin with.Block to be the Hub of ActivityThe Block will be the hub of activity for the programme. At least three dedicated mobilehealth teams in each Block will be engaged to conduct screening of children. Villages withinthe jurisdiction of the Block would be distributed amongst the 3 teams.The number of teams may vary depending on the number of anganwadi centres, schools,difficult to reach areas and enrolments of children in the schools. The mobile health teamwill consist of four members - two Doctors (AYUSH) one male and one female, one nurseand one pharmacist. The Block Programme Manager will chalk out a detailed screening plan for all the threeteams in consultation with schools, anganwadi centres and CHC Medical Officer. A tourdiary will be maintained by block health teams.Early Intervention Centre at District LevelAn Early Intervention Centre will be established at the District Hospital. The purpose ofEarly Intervention Centre is to provide referral support to children detected with healthconditions during health screening. A team consisting of paediatrician, medical officer, staffnurses, paramedics will be engaged to provide services. This centre would have the basicfacilities to conduct tests for hearing, vision, neurological tests and behavioural assessment.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Training and ManagementTraining of the personnel involved in Child Health Screening and Early Intervention Serviceswould be through a cascading training approach. Standardized training modules are to bedeveloped in partnership with technical support agencies and collaborative centres. KEMHospital, Mumbai and Pune and Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for Hearing Handicapped,have been identified as public sector collaborative centres in Maharashtra for impartingtraining. Ministry of Health & Family Welfare has drawn up ‘Operational Guidelines’ for effectiveplanning and systematic implementation of the programme. These guidelines explain theprocess of identification and management of select conditions of huge public healthsignificance in India.Impact of the ProgrammeBy providing early intervention service, the new initiative is expected to bring economicbenefits in the long run by directly reducing expenditure in terms of providing critical healthcare. “Extending preventive and promotive health care would impact the National HumanCapital, reduce disease burden and also public health expenditure.” says Union Minister forHealth & Family Welfare Ghulam Nabi Azad.When fully implemented, the Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram is expected to benefitapproximately 270 million (27 crore) children across the country.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Rashtriya Gram Swaraj YojanaSponsored by: Both: Central & State GovernmentMinistry/Department: Ministry of Panchayati RajIntroduced on: Implemented since 2006-07Objectives  Assisting efforts of the State Government for training and capacity building of elected representatives of Panchayati Raj Institutions  It focuses primarily on providing financial assistance to the States/UTs for Training & Capacity Building of elected representatives (ERs) and functionaries of Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs)  Funding of the scheme is applicable only for the non-BRGF districts (provide internal link)  Upgradation of knowledge, skills and attitudes of Panchayat elected representatives to better perform their responsibilities towards the Panchayat  Orientation of the key officials associated with the functions devolved to Panchayats for effectively facilitating the Panchayats in their performance in respective areas  Improvement of the vigour of practice of grassroots level democracy through promoting the effective functioning of the Gram Sabha  Sensitisation of the media, political parties, representatives in the legislatures, civil society organisations, trade unions, service federations and citizens to view Panchayati Raj as an effective level of local governmentSalient Features:  Funding pattern of the scheme is: 75 % Central Government and 25% State Government  The scheme has two components of Training & Capacity Building and Infrastructure Development.  Under the component of Training & Capacity Building, financial assistance is provided to the States/UTs for Training of elected representatives (ERs) and functionaries of Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs as well as for setting up of Satellite/SWAN based training infrastructure for Distance Learning for the ERs and Functionaries of the PRIs.  Under the component of Infrastructure Development, assistance is provided for establishment of Panchayat Resource Centres/ Panchayat Bhawans at Block/Gram Panchayat levels.  The scheme is demand driven in nature  The training content encompasses a range of issues, including improving the process of planning, budgeting and expenditure management, information systems, participatory and consultative decision making, improving local taxation and in particular delivery of public services to the poor.  The scheme of RGSY supports the National Capability Building Framework of the Panchayati Raj Ministry for comprehensive Capacity Building & Training of the Elected Representatives & Functionaries of Panchayati Raj InstitutionsFree eBook Free Sharing
  • NoteA major initiative has been proposed by the Union Budget 2012-13 to strengthen Panchayatsacross the country through the Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Sashaktikaran Abhiyan(RGPSA). This programme will expand on the existing schemes for Panchayat capacitybuilding.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Mid Day Meal Scheme (World’s Largest School Feeding Programme)National Programme of Mid Day Meal in Schools (MDMS) is a flagship programme of theGovernment of India aiming at enhancing enrolment, retention and attendance andsimultaneously improving nutritional levels among children studying in Government, LocalBody and Government-aided primary and upper primary schools and the Centres rununder Education Guarantee Scheme (EGS) and Alternative & Innovative Education(AIE) and National Children Labour Project (NCLP) schools of all areas across the country.MDM is also served in drought-affected areas during summer vacation.The scheme has emerged as the world’s largest school programme for children of primaryand upper primary stage.Calorific ValueThe calorific value of a mid-day meal at upper primary stage has been fixed at a minimum of700 calories and 20 grams of protein by providing 150 grams of food grains (rice/wheat) perchild/school day.BudgetThe Union Budget 2012-13 has provided an outlay of Rs 11,937.00 crore for this scheme,which is inclusive of Rs 1193.70 crore for North Eastern Region (NER) and Sikkim.Objectives Enhancing enrolment Ensuring retention and attendance of students Improving Nutritional levels among children 8.41 crore primary children and 3.36 cr upper primary children — a total of 11.77 crore children were estimated to be benefited from MDM Scheme during 2009-10. 11.04 crore children were covered under MDM Scheme during 2009-10. During 2010-11, 11.36 crore children — 7.97 Cr. children in primary and 3.39 crore children in upper primary—are expected to be covered in 12.63 lakhs institutions. Today, Mid Day Meal scheme is serving primary and upper primary school children in entire country.Achievements 8.41 crore primary children and 3.36 cr upper primary children — a total of 11.77 crore children were estimated to be benefited from MDM Scheme during 2009-10. 11.04 crore children were covered under MDM Scheme during 2009-10. During 2010-11, 11.36 crore children — 7.97 Cr. children in primary and 3.39 crore children in upper primary—are expected to be covered in 12.63 lakhs institutions. Today, Mid Day Meal scheme is serving primary and upper primary school children in entire country.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Timeline And Salient Features The National Programme of Nutritional Support to Primary Education (NP- NSPE) was launched as a Centrally Sponsored Scheme on 15th August 1995, initially in 2408 blocks in the country By the year 1997-98, the NP-NSPE was introduced in all blocks of the country It was further extended in 2002 to cover not only children in classes I -V of Government, Government aided and local body schools, but also children studying in EGS and AIE centres Central Assistance under the scheme consisted of free supply of food grains @ 100 grams per child per school day, and subsidy for transportation of food grains up to a maximum of Rs 50 per quintal. In September 2004 the scheme was revised to provide cooked mid day meal with 300 calories and 8-12 grams of protein to all children studying in classes I – V in Government and aided schools and EGS/ AIE centres. In October 2007, the scheme has been further revised to cover children in upper primary (classes VI to VIII) initially in 3479 Educationally Backwards Blocks (EBBs). From 1st April, 2008, the programme covers all children studying in Government, Local Body and Government-aided primary and upper primary schools and the EGS/AIE centres including Madarsa and Maqtabs supported under SSA of all areas across the country.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA)Nodal Ministry: Ministry of Human Resource DevelopmentYear of launch: Operational since 2000-2001Budget: An outlay of Rs 25,555.00 crore has been provided for SSA including Rs 2519.36croreearmarked for North Eastern Region by the Union Budget 2012-13Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) is Government of India’s flagship programme for achievementof Universalization of Elementary Education (UEE) in a time bound manner, as mandated by86th amendment to the Constitution of India making free and compulsory Education to theChildren of 6-14 years age group, a Fundamental Right.SSA is being implemented in partnership with State Governments to cover the entire countryand address the needs of 192 million children in 1.1 million habitations.The programme seeks to provide access, equity, retention and quality in the area ofelementary education.Two additional components focusing on Girl Children in educationally backward blocks topromote gender parity are: 1. National Programme for Education of Girls at Elementary Education level 2. Kasturba Gandhi Balika VidyalayaObjectives  The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan aims to bridge social, regional and gender gaps, with the active participation of the community in the management of schools.  All efforts to support pre-school learning in ICDS centres or special pre-school centres in non ICDS areas are made to supplement the efforts of the Ministry of Women and Child Development.  The SSA programme is an endeavour to provide an opportunity for improving human capabilities of all children, through the provision of community-owned quality education in a mission mode.Goals Of SSA When It Was Launched  All children in school, Education Guarantee Centre, Alternate School or ‘Back-to- School’ camp by 2003  All children complete five years of primary schooling by 2007  Children complete eight years of elementary schooling by 2010  Focus on elementary education of satisfactory quality with emphasis on education for life  Bridge all gender and social category gaps at the primary stage by 2007 and at the elementary education level by 2010.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • SSA-RTEWith the passage of the RTE Act, changes have been incorporated into the SSA approach,strategies and norms.The changes encompass the vision and approach to elementary education, guided by thefollowing principles:  Holistic view of education, as interpreted in the National Curriculum Framework 2005, with implications for a systemic revamp of the entire content and process of education with significant implications for curriculum, teacher education, educational planning and management.  Equity, to mean not only equal opportunity, but also creation of conditions in which the disadvantaged sections of the society — children of SC, ST, Muslim minority, landless agricultural workers and children with special needs, etc — can avail of the opportunity.  Access, not to be confined to ensuring that a school becomes accessible to all children within specified distance but implies an understanding of the educational needs and predicament of the traditionally excluded categories — the SC, ST and others sections of the most disadvantaged groups, the Muslim minority, girls in general, and children with special needs.  Gender concern, implying not only an effort to enable girls to keep pace with boys but to view education in the perspective spelt out in the National Policy on Education 1986 /92; i.e. a decisive intervention to bring about a basic change in the status of women.  Centrality of teacher, to motivate them to innovate and create a culture in the classroom, and beyond the classroom, that might produce an inclusive environment for children, especially for girls from oppressed and marginalised backgrounds.  Moral compulsion is imposed through the RTE Act on parents, teachers, educational administrators and other stakeholders, rather than shifting emphasis on punitive processes.Salient Features  SSA has a special focus on girl’s education and children with special needs.  The programme seeks to open new schools in those habitations which do not have schooling facilities  It seeks to strengthen existing school infrastructure through provision of additional class rooms, toilets, drinking water, maintenance grant and school improvement grants.  The programme provides quality elementary education including life skills  It also provides computer education to bridge the digital divide  Existing schools with inadequate teacher strength is being provided with additional teachers, while the capacity of existing teachers is being strengthened by extensive training, grants for developing teaching-learning materials and strengthening of the academic support structure at a cluster, block and district level.Role Of Private Sector In SSAThough the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan is being administered through government andgovernment aided schools, some private unaided schools are also actively involved incontributing towards universal elementary education. Recently, the government enteredFree eBook Free Sharing
  • into an agreement with the World Bank for assistance to the tune of US $ 600 millionto fund the second phase of the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan.Free eBook Free Sharing
  • Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojna (RSBY)Nodal Ministry: Ministry of Labour and EmploymentYear of launch: Launched in October 2007, operational since April, 2008Budget: The Union Budget 2012-13 allocated Rs 1096.7 crore for the schemeProgress: Under the scheme more than 3.21 crore smart cards have been issued under ason July 2012Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojna (RSBY) aims to provide health insurance coverage for BelowPoverty Line (BPL) families. The beneficiary is any Below Poverty Line (BPL) family, whoseinformation is included in the district BPL list prepared by the State government. Theeligible family needs to come to the enrollment station, and the identity of the householdhead needs to be confirmed by the authorized official.The Ministry of Labour & Employment has extended the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana(RSBY) to domestic workers as well as MGNREGA beneficiaries. This scheme will also coverpeople who work in unorganized sectors in hazardous conditions. It has also been extendedto licensed porters, licensed vendors and licensed hawkers on the Railways in consultationwith Ministry of Labour & Employment.Objectives  To provide protection to BPL households from financial liabilities arising out of health shocks those involve hospitalization.Salient Features  Beneficiaries under RSBY are entitled to hospitalization coverage up to Rs. 30,000/- for most of the diseases that require hospitalization.  Government has fixed the package rates for the hospitals for a large number of interventions.  Pre-existing conditions are covered from day one and there is no age limit.  Coverage extends to five members of the family which includes the head of household, spouse and up to three dependents.  Beneficiaries need to pay only Rs 30/- as registration fee while Central and State Government pays the premium to the insurer selected by the State Government on the basis of a competitive bidding.  The premium for RSBY is different in different set of districts  Government pays the premium for RSBY.  Contribution by Government of India: 75% of the estimated annual premium of Rs.750, subject to a maximum of Rs. 565 per family per annum.  Central Government to pay 90% in case of Jammu & Kashmir and North east States  State Government pays the remaining premiumFree eBook Free Sharing
  • Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM)Year of Launch: December 2005. The mission was launched for a period of seven years.Nodal Ministry: Ministry of Housing & Urban Poverty AlleviationBudget: In the first phase, the government had planned to spend about Rs 81,000 crore, ofwhich Rs 42,000 crore was to come from the Centre.The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) comprises fourschemes. It funds specific projects for urban infrastructure and basic urban services in 65cities of India through two schemes, i.e. the Scheme for Urban Infrastructure andGovernance (UIG) and the Scheme for Basic Services to the Urban Poor (BSUP).The other two schemes, i.e. the Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small andMedium Towns (UIDSSMT) and the Integrated Housing and Slum Development Programme(IHSDP) cover non-Mission cities and towns with the aim of integrated provision of basicentitlements and services to all including the urban poor.Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns(UIDSSMT)Urban Renewal is one of the thrust areas in the National Common Minimum Programme ofthe Government and accordingly Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission(JNNURM) was launched on 3rd December 2005 with an investment of Rs.1,00,000.00crores in Mission period of seven years beginning 2005-06. Urban InfrastructureDevelopment Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT) is one of the components ofJNNURM. The Mission is the single largest initiative of the Government of India for planneddevelopment of cities and towns. (To know more about the Scheme, clickhere)Integrated Housing and Slum Development Programme (IHSDP)Integrated Housing & Slum Development Programme aims at combining the existingschemes of VAMBAY and NSDP under the new IHSDP scheme for having an integratedapproach in ameliorating the conditions of the urban slum dwellers who do not possessadequate shelter and reside in dilapidated conditions.The mission has completed its normal tenure of 7 years on March 31, 2012 and theGovernment has extended the period for 2 years i.e. upto March 2014 for completion ofongoing projects and reforms only. (To know more about the Scheme, click here)Objectives Of The MissionThe objectives of the JNNURM are to ensure that the following are achieved in the urbansector: Focussed attention to integrated development of infrastructure services in cities covered under the Mission Establishment of linkages between asset-creation and asset-management through a slew of reforms for long-term project sustainabilityFree eBook Free Sharing
  •  Ensuring adequate funds to meet the deficiencies in urban infrastructural services Planned development of identified cities including peri-urban areas, outgrowths and urban corridors leading to dispersed urbanisation Scale-up delivery of civic amenities and provision of utilities with emphasis on universal access to the urban poor Special focus on urban renewal programme for the old city areas to reduce congestion Provision of basic services to the urban poor including security of tenure at affordable prices, improved housing, water supply and sanitation, and ensuring delivery of other existing universal services of the government for education, health and social security. Under the JNNURM, the Government of India enters into partnership with state governments and Urban Local Bodies (ULBs). As a first step, the ULB has to prepare a perspective plan or a City Development Plan (CDP), which is followed by a Detailed Project Report (DPR) in line with the priorities laid out in the CDP. The state government and the ULB of a Mission city are required to sign a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the Government of India, where both the state government and the ULB commit to a set of reforms and they all agree to share in the funding of the project. The state government and the ULB are expected to make specified parallel financial contributions along with the Government of India. For large cities with population of more than 4 million, a 35 per cent grant is made by the Government of India, 15 per cent by the state government, and 50 per cent by the ULB. In the case of cities with population between 1 and 4 million, 50 per cent is provided by the Government of India, 20 per cent by the state government, and 30 per cent by the ULB. For all other cities, the Government of India provides 80 per cent of the grant, while the state government and the ULB contribute 10 per cent each. Cities in north-eastern states and Jammu and Kashmir receive 90 per cent grant from the Government of India and 10 per cent from the state government.Salient Features Under the JNNURM, the Government of India enters into partnership with state governments and Urban Local Bodies (ULBs). As a first step, the ULB has to prepare a perspective plan or a City Development Plan (CDP), which is followed by a Detailed Project Report (DPR) in line with the priorities laid out in the CDP. The state government and the ULB of a Mission city are required to sign a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the Government of India, where both the state government and the ULB commit to a set of reforms and they all agree to share in the funding of the project. The state government and the ULB are expected to make specified parallel financial contributions along with the Government of India. For large cities with population of more than 4 million, a 35 per cent grant is made byFree eBook Free Sharing
  • the Government of India, 15 per cent by the state government, and 50 per cent by the ULB. In the case of cities with population between 1 and 4 million, 50 per cent is provided by the Government of India, 20 per cent by the state government, and 30 per cent by the ULB. For all other cities, the Government of India provides 80 per cent of the grant, while the state government and the ULB contribute 10 per cent each. Cities in north-eastern states and Jammu and Kashmir receive 90 per cent grant from the Government of India and 10 per cent from the state government.NIJNNURM or JNNURM IIHigh Powered Expert Committee (HPEC) for estimating the investment requirement forurban infrastructure has recommended New Improved JNNURM (NIJNNURM) for the 12thfive year plan.Main features of the NIJNNURM spelt out by the committee are: Coverage — Accessible to all cities/towns – big and small Scale — 0.25 per cent of GDP annually Duration — 20 years City Differentials — Smaller cities and towns should be treated differently from larger cities and metros for funding, capacity building and reform content and timelines State Funding: State governments not required to make any financial contribution towards the NIJNNURM because of the Committee’s recommendation for devolutionUnion Ministry of Urban development, and Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation, inconsultation with other relevant agencies are putting together detailed guidelines for theNIJNNURM.Free eBook Free Sharing
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