Where next?  Innovation in Customer Service  Eric  Bohl, Head of Government Consulting 26 March 2008, Public Sector   Forums
What I’ll cover <ul><li>Introductory observations </li></ul><ul><li>Creating an integrated, multi-agency approach to custo...
<ul><li>Strategy-led: starting with the end in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Expert-driven: lean, fast and focused on what  matte...
1: Introductory observations
Government progress with CRM <ul><li>Widespread adoption of CRM practices in central and local government: </li></ul><ul><...
The challenge of engaging citizens <ul><li>Long-term trend of reduction in election turnout across developed world </li></...
Limitations of our approach to CRM <ul><li>Potential for driving benefits from end-to-end integration not yet realised: </...
2: Creating an integrated,  multi-agency approach to customer service
Cross-sectoral collaboration is the only way <ul><li>Simplifying our channels and creating more intelligent bundles of ser...
Where are we on the joining-up journey? Level 2 Joined up directorate Level 3 Joined up council Level 4 Joined up local se...
Exciting examples of front office shared services (see IDeA Knowledge Front Office Shared Services project) Healthy Living...
3: Flair in customer service design
Integrating sectors ...
... creating a new image ... Idea Store, Tower Hamlets
... bringing design quality to customer service ... Customer Service Centre, Lambeth
 
 
4: Building trust – delivering service assurance and reducing costs
We must constantly win trust <ul><li>Keeping our promises: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing expectation – who buys the idea ...
Weaknesses in our use of CRM <ul><li>Our approach to front-office/back-office separation is not sophisticated enough </li>...
5: New approaches to shared services and outsourcing
Barriers to change <ul><li>Not invented here – reluctance to share someone else’s services </li></ul><ul><li>Resistance to...
Some trends <ul><li>Outsourcing and joint ventures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Larger, longer outsourced contracts, eg Southwar...
Lessons learned <ul><li>It is possible to build more flexible contracts that allow for fair balance of risk/reward </li></...
6: Towards citizen relationship management
We can make our interactions ‘personal’ <ul><li>We are re-building our services to allow the citizen to include us in thei...
Connecting the personal with the political <ul><li>We have an opportunity to connect ‘services’ to ‘issues’ – engaging peo...
A new model for ‘citizen’ CRM Citizen Citizen Individual consumer Individual agent Public consumer Collective agent
Conclusion <ul><li>Citizen-focused CRM has the power to reinvigorate the democratic processes </li></ul><ul><li>A vigorous...
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Innovation In Customer Service

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This presentation was given by Eric Bohl at a Public Sector Forum training session.

The presentation looks at citizen-focused CRM, a multi-agency approach to citizen relationship management and its role in creating an efficient, intelligent service design. It also points out the new approaches to shared services and outsourcing, specifically within the Local Government sector.

For more information, please go to www.8020i.co.uk .

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Innovation In Customer Service

  1. 1. Where next?  Innovation in Customer Service Eric Bohl, Head of Government Consulting 26 March 2008, Public Sector Forums
  2. 2. What I’ll cover <ul><li>Introductory observations </li></ul><ul><li>Creating an integrated, multi-agency approach to customer service </li></ul><ul><li>Flair in customer service design </li></ul><ul><li>Building trust – delivering service assurance and reducing costs </li></ul><ul><li>New approaches to shared services and outsourcing </li></ul><ul><li>Towards citizen relationship management </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Strategy-led: starting with the end in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Expert-driven: lean, fast and focused on what matters </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology-enabled: but not driven </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling & empowering: by transferring knowledge, skills, tools & methods </li></ul>8020i - a new approach to sourcing advice:
  4. 4. 1: Introductory observations
  5. 5. Government progress with CRM <ul><li>Widespread adoption of CRM practices in central and local government: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of call centres, self-service web channels now routine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Widespread use of CRM IT systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moves towards single ‘account’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cautious progress toward development of data warehousing, sharing and analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing number of examples of inter-agency collaboration, but: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There is a risk of pushing local authority shared services at the expense of collaboration within Local Strategic Partnerships </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. The challenge of engaging citizens <ul><li>Long-term trend of reduction in election turnout across developed world </li></ul><ul><li>Particularly low turn-out in Britain </li></ul><ul><li>A variety of reasons have been suggested, eg: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparatively centralised structures of government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local issues struggle to attract media attention </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Limitations of our approach to CRM <ul><li>Potential for driving benefits from end-to-end integration not yet realised: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Progress towards system integration painfully slow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Insufficient use of ‘service assurance’ techniques </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow progress across the sector in building ‘business intelligence’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Over-reliance on the private sector model: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Over-simplified approach to service offerings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relationships with citizens defined as consumers of services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Not yet seizing opportunity to use CRM as part of our wider strategies, eg choice, civic engagement and place-shaping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our citizens are not just customers </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. 2: Creating an integrated, multi-agency approach to customer service
  9. 9. Cross-sectoral collaboration is the only way <ul><li>Simplifying our channels and creating more intelligent bundles of services </li></ul><ul><li>There must be a stronger embrace of standardisation of processes across the public sector </li></ul><ul><li>We must continue building shared intelligence centres for Local Strategic Partnerships (LSP) </li></ul><ul><li>Creating shared LSP customer service and asset strategies: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Translating a ‘duty to co-operate’ into a ‘shared mission’ </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Where are we on the joining-up journey? Level 2 Joined up directorate Level 3 Joined up council Level 4 Joined up local services Level 5 Joined up central/local services <ul><li>One point of contact for council </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of consolidated IT systems across council </li></ul><ul><li>End to end process (front and back office) </li></ul><ul><li>Staff feel part of the council </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent points of access for all local pubic services </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly defined service levels irrespective of body providing service </li></ul><ul><li>Staff feel part of partnership </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent points of access for all government service, local and central </li></ul><ul><li>Staff feel part of public service </li></ul>Level 1 Individual services <ul><li>Single service focus </li></ul><ul><li>Many points of contact within each directorate </li></ul><ul><li>Different point solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Staff feel part of their service </li></ul><ul><li>One point of contact for directorate </li></ul><ul><li>Consolidation of IT systems </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of new channels </li></ul><ul><li>Staff feel part of their directorate </li></ul>
  11. 11. Exciting examples of front office shared services (see IDeA Knowledge Front Office Shared Services project) Healthy Living Centre, Weston-super-Mare
  12. 12. 3: Flair in customer service design
  13. 13. Integrating sectors ...
  14. 14. ... creating a new image ... Idea Store, Tower Hamlets
  15. 15. ... bringing design quality to customer service ... Customer Service Centre, Lambeth
  16. 18. 4: Building trust – delivering service assurance and reducing costs
  17. 19. We must constantly win trust <ul><li>Keeping our promises: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing expectation – who buys the idea of ‘excellence’? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Driving full integration, automation and measurement of fulfilment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep asking for permission to share data and systems – actively and transparently: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demonstrating the personal benefits and the convenience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making the sharing visible and allowing opt-outs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demonstrating efficiency and value-for-money delivered by our investments in customer service </li></ul>
  18. 20. Weaknesses in our use of CRM <ul><li>Our approach to front-office/back-office separation is not sophisticated enough </li></ul><ul><li>We are not yet automating sufficiently to realise full savings possible </li></ul><ul><li>System integration is proceeding too slowly, with weak leadership of our sector’s relationships with our IT suppliers </li></ul><ul><li>We are not routinely using the customer experience to refine services and deliver quality </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities to improve and mature our contact centres: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adopting service assurance techniques to eliminate the ‘cost of failure’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>See Contact Council’s ‘Performance Management Framework for publicly funded contact centres’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Possibility of establishing performance benchmarks for sector </li></ul></ul>
  19. 21. 5: New approaches to shared services and outsourcing
  20. 22. Barriers to change <ul><li>Not invented here – reluctance to share someone else’s services </li></ul><ul><li>Resistance to change – professional and institutional self-interest </li></ul><ul><li>Concerns about accountability – who’s really in charge and who’s responsible? </li></ul><ul><li>Unrealistic expectations of both change and savings </li></ul><ul><li>Perceptions of risk – both real and imagined </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of expertise in contracting and common standards and processes </li></ul>
  21. 23. Some trends <ul><li>Outsourcing and joint ventures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Larger, longer outsourced contracts, eg Southwark and Thurrock </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Major joint ventures, eg Liverpool, Suffolk, East Riding and Somerset </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More bundling together of back-office and customer service contracts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Shared services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow growth in shared services in local government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Predominance of back office shared services, eg HR, benefits processing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing of CRM systems and methodologies, eg Warwickshire Direct </li></ul></ul>
  22. 24. Lessons learned <ul><li>It is possible to build more flexible contracts that allow for fair balance of risk/reward </li></ul><ul><li>Need to work hard on communication within new and ‘client’ organisation – beware psychology of in-group/out-group formation </li></ul><ul><li>Value in importing external expertise to support transformation and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Possible to learn and replicate the methodologies needed for intelligent sourcing to succeed </li></ul><ul><li>Need to legislate for success – conditioning the relationships for positive outcomes and continuous learning </li></ul><ul><li>Bravery can lead to startling results </li></ul>
  23. 25. 6: Towards citizen relationship management
  24. 26. We can make our interactions ‘personal’ <ul><li>We are re-building our services to allow the citizen to include us in their ‘portal’ </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of councils presenting a single ‘account’ to our citizens, across services and sectors </li></ul><ul><li>We are gradually providing more feedback mechanisms and building continuous dialogue, using the ideas and expertise of citizens to improve services </li></ul><ul><li>We can connect people’s services with their interests and with realising their potential </li></ul>
  25. 27. Connecting the personal with the political <ul><li>We have an opportunity to connect ‘services’ to ‘issues’ – engaging people in debates about the future of their neighbourhood and their ‘place’ </li></ul><ul><li>Actively engaging in Web 2.0 – connecting communities of interest to our councillors’ web space and blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling people to build consensus - and dissent – over local, regional and national issues </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s take the opportunity to make CRM serve democracy – it’s what we are there for </li></ul>
  26. 28. A new model for ‘citizen’ CRM Citizen Citizen Individual consumer Individual agent Public consumer Collective agent
  27. 29. Conclusion <ul><li>Citizen-focused CRM has the power to reinvigorate the democratic processes </li></ul><ul><li>A vigorous, multi-agency approach to Citizen Relationship Management will enable more efficient, intelligent service design </li></ul><ul><li>CRM must be seen as a whole-organisation approach to engaging with citizens </li></ul><ul><li>We are building the capability to transform our citizens’ relationships with the state </li></ul>

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