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Sustainable Australia - Jamie Quinn Consulting
 

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    Sustainable Australia - Jamie Quinn Consulting Sustainable Australia - Jamie Quinn Consulting Presentation Transcript

    • Sustainable Australia
      Presentation by
      Jamie Quinn
      Managing Director of Jamie Quinn Consulting and
      Senior Associate of Eidos Institute www.eidos.org.au
      to
      Eidos Institute and SEGRA
      Regional Development National Conference
      Wednesday 28 September 2011
      (website publication version)
      1
    • Sustainable Australia is a three part story about where and how Australia can productively and sustainably accommodate more people.
      1st part - Why Sustainable Australia is our greatest challenge
      2nd part - Facing the challenge together (community, business and all levels of Government)
      3rd part - Growing the role of communities and Councils
      2
    • 3
      The 1st part of the Story
      Why Sustainable Australia is our greatest challenge
    • Geological Time Clock – Keeping ourselves in perspective
      4
      We are the tiny speck at the end
      of 4,600 million years.
    • 5
      Global Population Projection
    • 6
      The human race has existed for many thousands of years, but it took until just over 200 years ago - about the year 1800 - for our population to reach 1 billion. Since then we have been populating Mother Earth at a tremendous, and unsustainable, rate.
      The world population increased by 3 billion in the last 40 years and is projected to increase by 2.4 billion in the next 40 years, from 6.8 billion (in 2010) to 9.2 billion (in 2050). That’s equivalent to the existing combined population of China (1.3 billion) and India (1.1 billion) - in just 40 years.
    • 7
      Alarm bells are ringing – but how much attention is being paid?
    • 8
      Australian Population Projection
      Source: Australian Government 2010 Intergenerational Report
      Projected population profile challenging sustainability
    • 9
      Big Australia? Small Australia? Who knows? However, if the world is increasing by the combined population of existing China and India - in just 40 years – Australia’s growth is more likely to be on the high side.
      Irrespective of the eventual size of the increase, we have to be able to answer the where and how questions.
      Additional to the Sustainable Australia challenge, world growth in the order of 2 billion plus in the next 40 years will force Australia - a large, resource rich, sparsely inhabited land - to confront enormous international pressures and world food security challenges.
      Australia’s changing population profile is just as critical as its absolute population growth. An aging population and reducing tax payer base will challenge Australia’s economic sustainability going forward.
    • 10
      warning bell
      Metropolitan traffic congestion
    • 11
      another warning bell – urban water crises
      Attribution: Queensland Government
      Wivenhoe Dam, SEQ – April 2007
    • 12
      another warning bell
      Murray-Darling water crisis
    • 13
      Other Warning Bells
      soaring living costs – electricity, water, transport
      metropolitan creep into good agricultural land
      waterway health risk
      species risk and extinction
      underground water risk
      natural disaster impacts exacerbated by previous poor planning
      crime and personal safety concerns
      environmental and economic production conflict
      energy and environment conflict
      energy and economic production conflict
      biodiversity impacts
    • 14
      A growing and changing World shaping Australia’s Future
      Beijing – Good one day, not so good the next. Attribution: Bobak
    • 15
      Doesn’t matter which side of the world you live on
      Santiago Chile. Attribution: Wurstsalat
    • 16
      Or at home
      Ipswich 2011 Floods
      Courtesy: Melissa Hicks
    • 17
      Or in the Aussie Outback
      Attribution: VirtualSteve
    • 18
      No matter where -
      this is a human tragedy
      Attribution: L. Conrad
    • 19
      Over time, the world’s problems will more pressingly become Australia’s problems. We’ll have to be part of the global solution. We won’t have a choice. We must face the Sustainable Australia challenge head-on in order to address the warnings pulsing out across our nation. That means coping with a whole raft of issues such as:
      • Impacts of Chinese and Indian urbanization
      • Changing demography
      • Health servicing
      • Housing affordability
      • Economic sustainability
      • Immigration
      • Productivity
      • Workforce participation
      • Infrastructure
      • Impacts on biodiversity and ecological sustainability
      • Climate change
      • Carbon constraint
      • Energy security
      • Water security
    • 20
      Australian Population Distribution
      – More Context for the Challenge
    • 21
      Population of Australia’s 18 Major Cities – comparison 2004 and 2009
      Source: Figure 1 of National Urban Policy 2010 Discussion Paper
    • 22
      15 million (68 %) of the Australian population of 22 million is accommodated in the 5 metropolitan regions of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.
      A further 1.5 million (7%) is accommodated in the remaining 13 major cities of 100,000 population or greater. The 18 major cities of Australia comprise just a few % of the Australian land mass, 75 % of the population, 75 % of jobs and produce 80 % of the GDP.
    • 23
      Australia/USA/China/India/Indonesia – Urbanisation and Population Distribution Comparison
      Getting Australia’s population into perspective
    • 24
      • Australia (22 million) is 89% urbanized at an annual urbanization rate of 1.2% with $41,000 per capita GDP - it has 5 cities greater than 1 million, of which Sydney is the most populous with 4.6 million – in all there are 18 cities greater than 100,000
      • USA (313 million) is 82% urbanized at an annual urbanization rate of 1.2% with $47,200 per capita GDP - it has 4 cities of population greater than 5 million, of which metropolitan New York is 19 million and Los Angeles 12 million – in all there are 280 cities greater than 100,000
      • China (1.3 billion) is 47% urbanized at an annual urbanisation rate of 2.3% with $7,600 per capita GDP – it has 4 cities greater than 9 million, of which Shanghai is 16 million and Beijing 12 million – in all there are about 160 cities greater than 1 million
    • 25
      • India (1.1 billion) is 30% urbanized at an annual urbanisation rate of 2.4% with $3,500 per capita GDP – it has 5 cities greater than 7 million, of which New Delhi is 21 million, Mumbai 19 million and Kolcata 15 million – in all there are 43 cities of population greater than 1 million
      • Indonesia (245 million) is 44% urbanised at an annual urbanisation rate of 1.7% with $4,200 per capita GDP – it has 4 cities greater than 2 million, of which Jakarta is 9 million
    • 26
      Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
      (Source: 1987 Report of the Brundtland Commission – United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development.)
    • 27
      This is not sustainable development
      Attribution: A. Palmer
      Attribution: J Dwyer
    • 28
      The 2nd part of the Story
      Facing the challenge together
      Community, business and all levels of Government planning and implementing Sustainable
      Australia
      We all have a role to play
    • 29
      Projected absolute growth and rates of growth in major cities between 2001 and 2006
      Source: Dec 2010 Sustainable Pop. Strategy - Productivity and Prosperity Panel Report – Figure 6.1
    • 30
      Projected rates of population growth between 2006 and 2031
      The Beginning of Australia’s Future – working out where and how Australia can productively and sustainably accommodate more people
      Source: Dec 2010 Sustainable Pop. Strategy - Productivity and Prosperity Panel Report – Figure 2.4
      Rates of growth are only one view of the challenge
    • 31
      When we fully engage business and community, with a scientifically established evidence base - within a Sustainable Australia Framework that integrates national, State and Local Government planning – and when we get the right answers to the tough where and how questions - the projection of rate of population growth (indicated in the December 2010 Sustainable Population Strategy - Productivity and Prosperity Panel Consultation Report) may be very different.
      Increased population, urban renewal and the need for productivity growth will drive development. Failures of the past are driving community understanding of the need for better planning for the future.
      Understanding where and how we can productively and sustainably accommodate between 8 million (world trend) and 13 million (2010 Intergeneration Report projection) additional people in metropolitan and regional Australia by 2050, is fundamental to addressing the Sustainable Australia challenge. This is a central tenet of the Australian Government’s Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities Strategy, released by Minister Burke in May 2011.
    • 32
      The Where and How Questions are:
      Where and how do we grow sustainable communities in metropolitan and regional Australia?
      How do we ensure renewal development is sustainable?
      How do we ensure sustainable development delivers productivity growth and community wellbeing?
    • 33
      The Sustainable Australia Framework has three components:
      Top component - Australian Government nation building and sustainability policies
      The glue in the middle – State/Territory Governments and the Regional Development Australia Partnership
      Foundation component – community, business and Local Government
    • 34
      The Australian Government and State/Territory Governments recognise the challenge and relevant public policy and planning is evolving.
      There is a lot still to be done, but it is heading in the right direction.
    • 35
      The top component of the Framework comprises Australian Government nation building and sustainability policy. Many reviews, policies and plans have emerged in recent years including:
      • - Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities Strategy (May 2011)
      • - National Urban Policy (May 2011)
      • - Infrastructure Australia (Infrastructure Australia Act 2008)
      • - Regional Development Australia (September 2009)
      • - National Aviation Policy (December 2009)
      • - 2010 Intergenerational Report (January 2010)
      • - National Broadband Network (FTTP announcement April 2009)
      • - National Ports Strategy (December 2010)
      • - National Land Freight Strategy (consultation paper issued February 2011)
      • - Carbon Price (transition to ETS announcement February 2011)
      • - National Digital Economy Strategy (May 2011)
    • 36
      Much of the national planning effort in the infrastructure and sustainable development space is being undertaken by Infrastructure Australia with associated government agencies.
      Much of the co-ordination and implementation is being driven through the Action Plan attached to the National Urban Policy released by Minister Albanese in May 2011.
    • Example of current national planning - Indicative national land
      freight network
      Source: National Land Freight Strategy Discussion Paper February 2011
      37
    • Source: National Land Freight Strategy Discussion Paper February 2011
      38
      Example of current national planning
    • 39
      Qld Regional Planning Projects – at November 2010
      Queensland Government example
      The glue in the middle is provided by State and Territory Governments and Regional Development Australia.
      Some States are quite advanced - eg in Queensland the planning legislative framework includes:
      • the Water Act - Water Resource Plans, Resource Operations Plans and Water Supply Strategies
      • the Sustainable Planning Act – State Regional Plans and Council Land Use Planning Schemes
      • the Local Government Act - Community Plans, Corporate Plans, Financial Plans and Asset Management Plans
      Map Source: Qld Dept of Local Govt. and Planning website
    • 40
    • 41
      The Regional Development Australia Charter, of September 2009, establishes a partnership between the Australian, State, Territory and Local governments to develop and strengthen the regional communities of Australia.
      There are 55 RDA committees in Australia and the RDA Charter provides that RDA will work with all sectors of the community to contribute to and drive:
      • regional business growth plans and strategies
      • environmental solutions for sustainability and management of climate change
      • social inclusion strategies
    • 42
      Australia’s projected changing population profile
      Source: Australian Govt. Intergenerational Report 2010
      Economic sustainability is a major goal of much of the government policy and planning effort.
      Part of the Sustainable Australia challenge is to minimize the negative impact on workforce participation and maximize productivity growth.
    • 43
      A significant emerging gap is the community and Council role in the Sustainable Australia Framework.
      Most of the 560 Councils of Australia and our local communities need help to play their role in SAF.
    • 44
      Top-down only will fail
      Bottom-up only will fail
      It must be an integrated top-down-bottom-up approach
    • 45
      The 3rd part of the Story
      Growing the role of Communities and Councils
    • 46
      Communities and Councils – the building blocks of Australian society
      Attribution: Melburnian
    • 47
      Communities are the building blocks of Australian society.
      They are many and varied; and insightful and powerful when well informed, engaged and well governed.
      Local Councils must engage and lead their communities in understanding their region’s capacity for sustainable development.
      In Queensland, the Community Plan is the peak Council planning instrument which establishes the community’s vision and gives direction to all other Council planning.
    • 48
      Growing the role of Communities and Councils
      Attribution: Sage Ross
      Community Planning facilitated by a Local Sustainable Development System (LSDS) comprise the foundation component of the Sustainable Australia Framework
    • 49
      Eidos Institute
      Sustainable Australia Seminar
      Friday 2 December 2011
      Will focus on how to grow the role of Communities and Councils
      The balance of this presentation touches lightly on how to grow the community and Council roles – and some of the research and development needs - to give a flavour of the foundation component of the Sustainable Australia Framework.
    • 50
      Sustainable Australia involves growing the role of communities and Councils through Community Planning, facilitated by a Local Sustainable Development System (LSDS).
      Australian communities want their local planning to convert their vision into sustainable reality and community wellbeing.
      Community Planning is well established in the Qld Local Government Act. The LSDS uses evidence emanating from national and State planning outcomes and builds upon public and private investment. It provides a vehicle by which Councils can engage and lead their communities in understanding their region’s capacity for sustainable development and its contribution to Sustainable Australia.
      In Queensland, the Local Sustainable Development System is supportive of, and simply folds into the existing Community Planning process. It will greatly enhance the Community Planning outcomes; and community ownership of the outcomes.
    • 51
      Summary of the Local Sustainable
      Development System:
      • Aim and specific outcomes
      • 10 critical success factors
      • LSDS definitions
      • 7 steps in LSDS
      • Process chain for determining
      urban design capacity
      • Process chain for determining
      surplus regional design capacity
    • 52
      The LSDS aim is delivery of productivity growth and community wellbeing through specific outcomes including:
      • assessment of sustainable growth capacity
      • consistency with the national and regional development agenda
      • sustainable growth and/or sustainable renewal
      • maintenance of surplus regional design capacity
    • 53
      What would a Local Sustainable Development System have to do well to deliver the necessary outcomes for Sustainable Australia?
      10 LSDS critical success factors:
      Evidence based community visioning
      Sensitive to regional history and geography
      Take advantage of regional strengths
      Manage regional risks
      Balance competing issues
      Be impact assessable
      Be affordable
      Assess sustainable growth capacity
      Guide subordinate planning
      Deliver sustainable development, productivity
      growth and community wellbeing
    • 54
      Two South East Queensland examples of the need for:
      • Sustainable regional design (Lockyer Valley)
      • Acceptable urban design (Ipswich regional
      business and industry parks)
    • 55
      An important SEQ example of the need for sustainable regional design is preservation and development of the Lockyer Valley as one of Australia’s premium food bowls.
      Source: SEQ Water Strategy Consultation Draft
    • 56
      Lockyer Valley –
      a freak of earth’s
      geologic development
    • 57
      Lockyer Valley is an important element of Australia’s future food security in the face of the unsustainable impact of increasing food miles.
      Water resources are critical for the preservation and development of Lockyer Valley and accordingly water resource planning and strategy will be an important component in assessment of the regional design capacity of SEQ.
    • 58
      Important SEQ Western Corridor aspects of acceptable urban design involve water security and Ipswich’s development of major business and industry parks in reasonable proximity to residential growth.
      Source: Ipswich 2020 and Beyond - Ipswich City Council website www.ipswich.qld.gov.au
    • 59
      Acceptable urban design capacity is the product of the urban design density profile, which is acceptable to the community, and the size and shape of the urban footprint. It must account for all sustainability issues, including competitive advantage. The more effective the evidence based engagement of business and community, the closer the acceptable urban design capacity will be to the optimum urban design capacity, which is controlled by regional design capacity.
      Important SEQ Western Corridor aspects of acceptable urban design involve water security and Ipswich’s development of major industry parks in reasonable proximity to residential growth. Population and jobs must come together. Population without jobs is not sustainable; and, of course, water security is critical for both population and jobs.
      SEQ now has the most secure water supply of any Australian metropolitan area.
      In the case of Ipswich’s development of these job generators in reasonable proximity to residential growth (including Springfield and Ripley Valley), water security (and purified recycled water in particular) is a distinct competitive advantage. This enhances the opportunity for a reduced differential between acceptable urban design capacity and optimum urban design capacity, allowing Ipswich to play it’s a part in addressing the Sustainable Australia challenge.
    • 60
      We have to invest in research and development to plan and implement the future better than the past.
      Attribution: Sendination
    • 61
      We need a really well equipped tool box to achieve Sustainable Australia. Currently the tool box is only partly equipped.
      We didn’t plan and implement the past anywhere near well enough because we didn’t understand the implications for our future well enough. We can’t make the same mistakes again. We can’t allow the ‘she’ll be right mate’ culture to blindside us in the next 40 years - as it did in the last 40 years. Our wealth of resources and low population base let us dodge a bullet – the world and Australia have changed. We can’t ignore the warnings any longer. We have to invest in research and development to plan and implement the future better than the past.
    • 62
      The LSDS and the Sustainable Australia Framework integration and optimization roles clearly highlight some research and development needs that include:
      • tools to develop the evidence base and evidence analysis
      • regional and urban design and capacity assessment tools
      • modelling and multi-dimensional scenario testing tools
      • tools to test for SAF integration and optimization
      • tools to test strategies for sustainable development in favour of productivity growth and community wellbeing
      • efficient mechanisms for private investment in enabling infrastructure
    • 63
      Conclusions and Actions for
      the Way Ahead relate to:
      • Sustainable Australia Framework
      • Local Sustainable Development System
      • Research and development to
      deliver Sustainable Australia
    • 64
      Australian, State and Local governments understand the need to manage Australia’s continuing population growth in a productive and sustainable way. Our egalitarian society demands a top-down-bottom-up approach. The Australian federal system of government is well suited to deliver this approach.
      The Australian Government has effectively established the top component of the Framework.
      The State Governments have reasonably advanced water and regional planning legislative frameworks in place. Regional Development Australia establishes a partnership between the Australian, State, Territory and Local governments to develop and strengthen the regional communities of Australia. The States and RDA comprise the glue in the middle.
    • 65
      The major gap is the foundation component – a Local Sustainable Development System to facilitate Community Planning in Councils (or other local or regional planning authorities) in all States and Territories.
      The lack of an effective LSDS jeopardises the whole Sustainable Australia effort by depriving all levels of government of:
      • a valuable local and regional evidence base
      • essential community and business engagement
      • tools and outcomes to support integrated and optimised regional and urban planning and design
      For Australia to productively and sustainably accommodate more people, the way ahead should be forged by actions to develop a comprehensive Sustainable Australia Framework, including a Local Sustainable Development System; and research and development necessary to support the planning and implementation of Sustainable Australia.