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  • 1. SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® Social Media Showcase
  • 2. COPIES AND COPYRIGHT As always, members are welcome to an unlimited number of copies of the materials contained within this handout. Furthermore, members may copy any graphic herein for their own internal purpose. The Corporate Executive Board Company requests only that members retain the copyright mark on all pages produced. Please contact your Member Support Center at +1-866-913-6451 for any help we may provide. The pages herein are the property of The Corporate Executive Board Company. Beyond the membership, no copyrighted materials of The Corporate Executive Board Company may be reproduced without prior approval. LEGAL CAVEAT The Marketing Leadership Council has worked to ensure the accuracy of the information it provides to its members. This report relies upon data obtained from many sources, however, and the Marketing Leadership Council cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information or its analysis in all cases. Furthermore, the Marketing Leadership Council is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional services. Its reports should not be construed as professional advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. Members requiring such services are advised to consult an appropriate professional. Neither The Corporate Executive Board Company nor its programs are responsible for any claims or losses that may arise from a) any errors or omissions in their reports, whether caused by the Marketing Leadership Council or its sources, or b) reliance upon any recommendation made by the Marketing Leadership Council.
  • 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS ■ Branded Online Communities ................................................ p. 4 a. American Express OPEN—Financial Services Company b. Pitney Bowes—Manufacturing and Services Company ■ Non-Branded Online Communities ....................................... p. 22 a. Dunkin Donuts—Restaurant Company b. Caterpillar—Manufacturing Company ■ Corporate Blogs......................................................................... p. 33 a. Indium—Manufacturing Company b. Marriott—Hospitality Company ■ Twitter .......................................................................................... p. 49 a. United Linen—Services Company b. Progress Software—Software Company ■ Online Videos ............................................................................. p. 62 a. Johnson & Johnson—Health Care and Beauty Company b. DuPont—Chemical Company ■ Virtual Worlds ............................................................................ p. 73 a. Cisco—Software Company b. Wells Fargo—Financial Services Company ■ Wikis ............................................................................................. p. 84 a. Intuit—Tax Software Company b. Ford—Automotive Company ■ Appendix ..................................................................................... p. 95 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 3
  • 4. BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES WHAT THEY ARE Branded online communities host a group of people with similar interests on a platform built, maintained, and branded by the company. WHAT THEY HELP YOU DO ■ Absorb customer information by collaborating with users to improve products/services. ■ Listen to users to get their feedback. ■ Animate your users by building a sense of community. ■ Support your users by providing easy-to-find solutions to their problems. ■ Talk to users and target your message more effectively. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ American Express OPEN ............................................................................................p. 6 ■ Pitney Bowes ....................................................................................................................p. 11 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 4
  • 5. BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES IS A BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITY RIGHT FOR YOU? Does your company have the resources to build, monitor, and maintain an online community? Start-up costs are significant in terms of awareness building and content spending. While some costs do dissipate over time, many companies underestimate the permanent, ongoing maintenance costs. One company found that initially one FTE was required to monitor every 100 key contributors (the 5% of users who generate 95% of the content). Are you willing to surrender a certain amount of control over your message? User-generated content chiefly drives communities, so encourage uses to take an active role. However, remember that posts are generally permanent, searchable, and associated with your brand (regardless of any disclaimers). Do you have a meaningful purpose that will drive users to network with each other? Your community will be more successful if you seek to engage on a deep level with a smaller set of dedicated users, rather than broadly with a wider audience, as those core users will drive engagement with others. Do you have the time and resources to wait for the community to build itself? With correct planning and implementation, eventually much of the content on your page will come from users. Until then, you will have to put in a higher level of effort to keep the page interesting and up to date. Do you have a plan to drive content? You need a plan for three types of content: user-generated, external and freelance submissions (i.e., bloggers), and company-generated. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 5
  • 6. AMERICAN EXPRESS’S OPEN FORUM WHO IT IS American Express OPEN is part of a global payments, network and travel company. WHO IT IS TARGETING Potential Customers: Small Businesses Owners WHAT IT DID To generate brand awareness and consideration, American Express OPEN created an online community with extensive content and a “connectodex” to help users make meaningful business connections with each other. Source: American Express; http://www.openforum.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 6
  • 7. AMERICAN EXPRESS’S OPEN FORUM WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Providing Valuable Teaching Content: American Express OPEN targets users with content that teaches them about running a business, which establishes American Express OPEN as an advisor and thought leader, rather than just a credit card provider and keeps leads warm even if they are not yet ready to buy. Balancing of Open and Premier Content: While prospective clients can access many of the online offerings, some are restricted to American Express cardholders, rewarding additional engagement with tangible benefits. Facilitating Peer Networking: Networking tools like the connectodex allow users to generate leads for their own business and drives a stronger sense of community, which drives return visits. The connectodex also creates a clear ROI for involvement with the site. Integrating with Web Site: Highlighting the forum on the main site drives traffic and reinforces the users’ conviction that American Express is dedicated to interacting with them, driving a more secure relationship. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Overcoming the Short Shelf Life of Subject Matter: Content that focuses on recent economic and business developments will need frequent updating to remain relevant. Utilizing Cross-Promotion: Bringing in content from outside bloggers may boost the blogger’s brand rather than American Express’s. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 7
  • 8. AMERICAN EXPRESS’S OPEN FORUM INTEGRATING WITH WEB SITE To maximize traffic, BALANCING American Express OF OPEN OPEN integrates its AND PREMIER online community CONTENT into the American Enough material Express Web site is available to and promotes it as a demonstrate the stand-alone microsite. community’s value to prospective clients, but PROVIDING the most VALUABLE interesting tools TEACHING CONTENT are reserved Open Forum enables for existing American Express customers to OPEN to share demonstrate the insights on running clear benefits a small business, of an American positioning the brand Express card. as an advisor, not just a credit card provider. Source: American Express; http://www.openforum.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 8
  • 9. AMERICAN EXPRESS’S OPEN FORUM OVERCOMING THE SHORT LIFE OF SUBJECT MATTER Partnering with experts helps American Express secure a steady stream of new content to keep the users returning regularly to the site. UTILIZING CROSS- PROMOTION Experts lend credibility while driving new traffic to the site through cross-promotion on other channels; however, they must be carefully screened to ensure that they will connect with users. Source: American Express; http://www.openforum.com/connectodex/alltop-1?username=guy-kawasaki-1. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 9
  • 10. AMERICAN EXPRESS’S OPEN FORUM FACILITATING PEER NETWORKING Facilitating lead generation for its users drives revisits. FACILITATING PEER NETWORKING Giving users the tools to identify peers with similar interests or complementary skill sets builds a stronger sense of community and increases the odds that users will return to the site. Source: American Express; http://www.openforum.com/connectodex/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 10
  • 11. PITNEY BOWES’S USER FORUM WHO IT IS Pitney Bowes is a manufacturer and provider of mailing technology and services. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current Customers: Mailing Professionals WHAT IT DID To increase customer delight, Pitney Bowes created an online community where customers can collaborate to resolve their technical problems. Source: Pitney Bowes; http://forums.pb.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 11
  • 12. PITNEY BOWES’S USER FORUM WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Developing Internal Metrics: Pitney Bowes determines metrics to measure ROI to drive internal stakeholder buy-in; it has identified how many service calls types of posts avert and the cost of those calls, allowing it to calculate overall costs saved by the forum. Identifying Community Leaders/Influentials and Solutions: Pitney Bowes allows users to either give a post “kudos” or “accept as solution” identification, making it easier for users to identify the solution that other known users have vetted, increasing customer delight and loyalty. Engaging Lead Steerers: Pitney Bowes reaches out to the most frequent users of its site to express its thanks and seek out feedback, driving customer engagement and feelings of gratification among its most powerful and useful advocates. Identifying and Humanizing Pitney Bowes Employees: Pitney Bowes clearly identifies its employees and provides in- depth biographical information about them to drive a sense of connection with users and to ensure that users see the forum as operating openly, creating trust and attachment with the company. Seeking Out Customer Opinions and Issues: Pitney Bowes seeks out customer opinions about the forums and hosts events about common problems to ensure that all customer needs are being met, ensuring that the forums act efficiently to solve customer problems early on. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Getting Answers to Customers: Pitney Bowes must monitor forums and step in with its expertise when users are not receiving answers (or are receiving wrong answers) to maintain the utility of the site for users; however, it must also drive customer-generated answers as those are both cheaper and preferred by users. Niche Audience: Pitney Bowes’s audience for the forums is small (around 3,000 users in the forums), which increases the importance of finding and retaining forum members to maintain an acceptable threshold of engagement. However, the niche nature of the forum does mean that it will attract more dedicated users. Source: BDI Conference; Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 12
  • 13. PITNEY BOWES’S USER FORUM SEEKING OUT CUSTOMER OPINIONS Pitney Bowes caters to customer wants and expectations HUMANIZING by seeking PITNEY BOWES customer EMPLOYEES feedback about Identifying the the forums and moderators with Pitney Bowes pictures and products. biographical information drives a sense of personal connection. Source: Pitney Bowes; http://forums.pb.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 13
  • 14. PITNEY BOWES’S USER FORUM IDENTIFYING COMMUNITY LEADERS/ INFLUENTIALS Identifying users as new or regular contributors gives regular contributors a sense of importance and ensures that their knowledge and dedication do not leave the site. Source: Pitney Bowes; http://forums.pb.com/t5/Equipment- Hardware-and-Supplies/DM100i-Insurance/m- p/5488#M1494. IDENTIFYING SOLUTIONS Users can find the post that answers their question, facilitating quick navigation to the solution in the future and smoothing the customer experience. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 14
  • 15. PITNEY BOWES’S USER FORUM SEEKING IDENTIFYING OUT ISSUES SOLUTIONS Pitney Bowes Identifying the heads off new content that users problems before have found most they arise by useful facilitates hosting “ask the navigation, experts” events smoothing in the forums for the customer specific issues. experience. Source: Pitney Bowes; http://forums.pb.com/t5/ASK-THE- EXPERTS-Preparing-For/bd-p/EXPERT-Move_update. IDENTIFYING PITNEY BOWES EMPLOYEES Clearly identifying Pitney Bowes employees establishes that the forum is operating transparently, ensuring customer trust. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 15
  • 16. BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined a branded online community is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Determine which customer segment you are going to target. STEP 2: Find a vendor to build the community or determine internal resourcing. STEP 3: Determine the supporting structure of content for your community. STEP 4: Develop guidelines for when, how fast, and who should respond to user comments. STEP 5: Decide how you will drive users to your community. Additional Tool: ■ Online Community Building Toolkit From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 16
  • 17. COMMUNITY VIABILITY ASSESSMENT CUSTOMER FIT BRAND FIT MARKETING FIT Understanding customers and their needs Achieving brand objectives through Achieving overall marketing goals through community community ■ Customer Demand ■ Fit with Brand Positioning ■ Organizational Fit – Would a community satisfy a particular – Is the idea of community consistent with – Does the community fit with the brand’s customer need? the brand positioning? broader advertising philosophy? – Has the customer expressed a desire to – How well does the brand positioning – Can a community be leveraged to support participate in a community around the support the scope of a community? sales and other organizational goals? brand? – How would a community add value to ■ Fit with Other Communications ■ Resource Intensity the life of the customer (i.e., information, – Can the community build measurable – Do we have the resources to create and entertainment, socialization)? brand loyalty? sustain a community over time? ■ Customer Potential for Engagement – Can the community extend or build – Do we have the technology to successfully up the brand or brand products in the build and maintain a community? – What is the potential for the target intended way? customer to be social or share ideas ■ External Partnerships through a community? ■ Brand Communications – How will a community affect our current – Could customers become emotionally – What is the community’s expected tenure business partnerships? invested in a community? On what level? (i.e., long-term versus temporary strategy)? – What is the potential to form new – Can a community be embedded in other partnerships through a community? brand communications? ■ Competition – Should community serve as a focal point for a particular brand or product – Are there other available resources that campaign? address similar customer needs (i.e., other communities, whether advertiser- supported or not)? From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 17
  • 18. REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL [Name of Company] is requesting proposals from online community platform providers. Background: Current Situation: Objectives: • Marketing Objective: [e.g., increase brand awareness by 5%] • Business Objective: [e.g., decrease cost to serve of this population by 10%] Target Audience: • Demographics of Target • Psychographics of Target Budget: A budget of [insert amount] has been dedicated to establishing an online community for user support, inclusive of one- time start-up costs and ongoing maintenance for the calendar year. Proposals: All proposals should indicate the following: • Brief company background • Current and past clients and current billings • Key account representatives and support structure • Identification of any outsourcing of work • A clearly defined scope of work • Specific recommendations to achieve specified objectives • Projected return for total investment • Proposals to be presented to the leadership team on [insert date] at [insert pitch location]. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 18
  • 19. ONLINE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT: ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES CHART MARKETING CUSTOMER SERVICE IT LEGAL Community Building Phase Post ground rules for community participation. Due 1 September Select and aggregate content that customers will find Due 30 September Due 30 September valuable. Integrate community with corporate Web site. Due 15 October Add community URL to marketing materials. Due 1 December Collect real-time metrics (e.g., unique visitors, time spent). Begin 1 October Community Management Phase Select vendor to police customer-generated content. Due 15 December Due 15 December Track long-term brand and marketing metrics (e.g., brand Begin 1 January affinity, lead generation). Introduce new Web elements that refresh community Due 30 January format (e.g., video, chat room). Identify and reward key community influencers. Begin 1 February From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 19
  • 20. ONLINE COMMUNITY PROMOTION PLAN INTERNAL PROMOTION VEHICLES Cross-promote your online community on your company’s other social media vehicles (e.g., Twitter account, YouTube channel). Ask employees to include your community URL in their e-mail signature. Include a link to your online community in company communications (e.g., press releases, whitepapers). Include a link to your online community in your next e-mail marketing campaign or customer newsletter. Add the online community URL to your call center menu and hold messages. EXTERNAL PROMOTION VEHICLES Conduct a phased rollout, allowing your brand passionates first access to the community to spark word-of-mouth referrals. Use SEO to ensure your online community appears in search listings. Monitor and respond to brand mentions in social media channels with a link to your online community. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 20
  • 21. FINGER ON THE PULSE Community Measurement Dashboard Key Feature #1: Customized Views GOODNITES DASHBOARD Community managers view the full METRICS CHECKLIST Illustrative dashboard (tab A) while other marketers access an important subset of data (tab B). ■ Community Metrics Time spent on site A B Key Feature #2: Unique visitors per day Benchmarks Returning visitors per day Using biweekly data, Time Online per Visit E-Mail Open Rate community managers Page views per visit can establish community Home page drop-off rate Y Mins. performance benchmarks. E-mail opt-in rate Z Mins. Y% E-mail open rate X Mins. X% Key Feature #3: Trouble Number of search engine referrals Spot Identification Number of Web site referrals Easily noticing a drop in First Second Third Jan. Apr. July Number of new e-mail addresses collected e-mail open rates allows Visit Visit Visit community managers to quickly change e-mail ■ Brand and Marketing Metrics content and format to Notes: Visitors per Day Brand loyalty ■ drive greater community Send participants e-mail after participation and Brand equity second visit showcasing latest content. interaction with customer. Sales/product volume ■ Refresh content midmonth to prevent drop-off in visits. Key Feature #4: Annotations 1 July 31 July The marketing metrics will vary according to your organization’s Community managers can business goals, so select the customize notes and insights measurements most appropriate about the community to facilitate for your business. decision making and ensure that key learnings are captured. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 21
  • 22. NON-BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES WHAT THEY ARE Non-branded online communities are social networking sites where companies interact with users in an environment that the users have already established. WHAT THEY HELP YOU DO ■ Listen to your users by reading their posts about your brand. ■ Talk to your users to boost brand awareness and share interesting content. ■ Animate your users to drive your word-of-mouth message. ■ Absorb lessons from your users by engaging and collaborating with them. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ Dunkin’ Donuts ................................................................................................................p. 24 ■ Caterpillar ...........................................................................................................................p. 28 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 22
  • 23. NON-BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES ARE NON-BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES RIGHT FOR YOU? Does your target audience use non-branded online communities? Searching the communities for related content or for your competitors’ presence can give you an idea of who is using the community. Do you want to share a wide range of content without devoting as many resources as a branded online community requires? Non-branded online communities allow you to share a wider range of content than Twitter or a blog, without requiring as much upkeep as a branded online community. Are you willing to surrender a certain amount of control over content? The more users you have, the more control they will have over the content of your page. Non-branded online communities also impose a certain format on your content. Do you have the time and resources to wait for the community to build itself? With correct planning and implementation, eventually much of the content on your page will come from users through posts. Until then, you will have to put in a higher level of effort to keep the page interesting and up to date. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 23
  • 24. DUNKIN DONUTS’ FACEBOOK WHO IT IS Dunkin Donuts is a coffee and donut retailer. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current and Potential Customers: Donut Fans WHAT IT DID To increase sales, Dunkin Donuts uses its Facebook page to drive word-of-mouth promotions. Source: Dunkin’ Donuts; http://www.Facebook.com/DunkinDonuts?v=wall&viewas=1560632397#/ DunkinDonuts?v=wall. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 24
  • 25. DUNKIN DONUTS’ FACEBOOK WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Driving Advocacy: Dunkin Donuts’ “Keep your Coolatta” contest rewarded Facebook users who had made their profile picture a picture of them and a coolatta (Dunkin Donuts product), driving word-of-mouth marketing and customer awareness of the product. Driving Interactivity: Dunkin Donuts makes its Facebook page interactive with polls and applications, increasing the “stickiness” of its page, and driving customer engagement. Minimizing Response Time: Dunkin Donuts responds quickly to user comments, particularly negative ones, to ensure that its customers are receiving good service and that the word-of-mouth message remains positive. Coordinating with Offline Channels: Dunkin Donuts reposts and/or repurposes content from offline channels to drive a unified and smooth customer experience across channels, ensuring that all messages are reinforcing rather than undermining each other. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Negative User Reactions: As Dunkin Donuts has gotten more fans, it has had more negative content to confront, including profane, user-generated content, which can hurt customer perceptions of the brand. Prioritizing Responses: As the page becomes more popular, Dunkin Donuts must develop a strategy for dealing with the high number of responses, both positive and negative, to ensure that customers know that their feedback is valued. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 25
  • 26. DUNKIN DONUTS’ FACEBOOK MINIMIZING RESPONSE TIME Responding quickly to complaints can turn a dissatisfied customer into a satisfied one, ensuring that the word- DRIVING of-mouth message INTERACTIVITY remains positive. Polls and games increase interactivity and drive customer engagement. COORDINATING WITH OFFLINE CHANNELS Posting references to Dunkin Donuts in the news or media drives brand awareness. Source: Dunkin’ Donuts; http://www.Facebook.com/DunkinDonuts?v=wall&viewas=1560632397#/DunkinDonuts?v=wall. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 26
  • 27. DUNKIN DONUTS’ FACEBOOK COORDINATING WITH OFFLINE CHANNELS Highlighting offline contests increases publicity and drives customer engagement. DRIVING INTERACTIVITY Fun quizzes keep the tone of Dunkin Donuts’ Facebook page light and approachable. Source: Dunkin’ Donuts; http://www.Facebook.com/DunkinDonuts?v=wall&viewas=1560632397#/DunkinDonuts?v=app_4949752878. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 27
  • 28. CATERPILLAR’S FACEBOOK PAGE WHO IT IS Caterpillar is a manufacturer of construction and agricultural equipment. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current and Potential Customers: Construction Workers WHAT IT DID To build brand awareness, Caterpillar uses its Facebook page to provide engaging content about its products. Source: Caterpillar. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 28
  • 29. CATERPILLAR’S FACEBOOK PAGE WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Embracing User-Generated Content: Caterpillar actively solicits Caterpillar-specific content from its users but focuses on lighter content to ensure that users enjoy spreading the word-of-mouth message, increasing the likelihood that they will do so. Adopting the Right Tone: Caterpillar adjusts its tone to that of its users, ensuring that the conversation proceeds at a level the fans are comfortable with and that they are put off neither by over-familiarity nor by an overly corporate message. Driving User Interest: Caterpillar piques user interest by posting announcements about coming contests to drive return visits to the page and the world-of-mouth message. Integrating Platforms: Caterpillar uses its Facebook page to keep users updated about Caterpillar content and contests across platforms, which increases site visits overall. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Global Accommodation: Since Caterpillar is a global company, it must figure out a way to deal with the many comments and suggestions that are posted in languages other than English to ensure that no customer feels like their contribution is not valued. Developing Response Guidelines: While it is easy to determine when a company should respond to complaints or requests, it is harder to determine when to respond to neutral or positive posts in order to drive a conversation with users. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 29
  • 30. CATERPILLAR’S FACEBOOK PAGE ADOPTING THE RIGHT TONE Caterpillar adjusts its responses to fan content to reflect the context of the posting, driving customer engagement. EMBRACING USER- GENERATED CONTENT Caterpillar solicits content from its users to ensure that the page is acting as a two-way communications channel but keeps the content fun to keep customers engaged. Source: Caterpillar. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 30
  • 31. CATERPILLAR’S FACEBOOK PAGE INTEGRATING DRIVING USER PLATFORMS INTEREST Caterpillar promotes Caterpillar not only its other social uses its Facebook media channels to page to promote drive traffic and contests and engagement across giveaways, but it platforms. also posts heads-up about the contest ahead of time, driving user interest in the Facebook page and revisits. Source: Caterpillar. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 31
  • 32. NON-BRANDED ONLINE COMMUNITIES: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined non-branded online communities are right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Develop a content strategy that focuses on strong content and more frequent updates in the initial phase until you reach a certain threshold of users. STEP 2: Adapt offline marketing mechanisms (contests, etc.) to the community. Do not neglect adjusting length and tone of messages. STEP 3: Develop guidelines for when, how fast, and who should respond to user comments. STEP 4: Adjust your tone to that of your users; if they engage you in personal or inconsequential conversations, allow the conversation to move in that direction. STEP 5: Integrate your account with your Internet properties, including your Web site and other social media channels. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 32
  • 33. CORPORATE BLOGS WHAT THEY ARE A Web log—or “blog”—is a frequently updated Web site featuring original commentary and links to related Web sites. WHAT THEY HELP YOU DO ■ Talk with users in order to establish position as an industry thought leader. ■ Animate your users to boost brand awareness/visibility through word of mouth. ■ Listen to your users by tracking comments. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ Indium Corporation .......................................................................................................p. 35 ■ Marriott ................................................................................................................................p. 39 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 33
  • 34. CORPORATE BLOGS IS A CORPORATE BLOG RIGHT FOR YOU? Does your target audience read or contribute to blogs? To make the most of social media, start where your target user is already active. Is your industry “blog friendly”? Have you seen competitors or other thought leaders in your space succeed using blogs? Blogging tends to work best for niche audiences. Can you identify a specific objective for your blog? Blogging without a strategy or objective will result in a blog with no coherent personality that jumps around from post to post. Do you have employees who will regularly devote time to maintaining your blog? Writers who are excited about what they are writing about need to update blogs regularly. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 34
  • 35. INDIUM’S BLOGS: WHEN CONNECTIONS COUNT WHO IT IS Indium is a manufacturer and supplier of metal products. WHO IT IS TARGETING Purchase Influencers: Engineers WHAT IT DID To establish itself as an industry thought leader, Indium hosts a selection of employee-written blogs that discuss a range of engineering and manufacturing issues. Source: Indium Corporation; http://www.indium.com/blogs/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 35
  • 36. INDIUM’S BLOGS: WHEN CONNECTIONS COUNT WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Driving Interaction: Bloggers respond quickly to users in comments and incorporate suggestions in future blog posts, which reassures users that their input is valued, leading to a higher number of return visits. Driving Users to the Blogs: Indium prominently features the blogs on its Web site, increasing traffic to the blogs. It also uses RSS feeds and blog rolls to drive revisits and keep leads warm. Responding to Users: Bloggers respond quickly to user comments and incorporate them in future posts, ensuring that users feel that their opinion is valued and increasing opportunities to learn from and adapt to customers. Displaying a Clear Call to Action: Linking to relevant upcoming events drives traffic to offline venues where representative of the company can move them along the purchase cycle. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Maintaining a Consistent Look and Feel: Graphics and templates differ across the different Indium bloggers, highlighting their individuality, but hindering a cohesive experience for the user. Mitigating Legal Risks: Blogging about technical topics may increase the company’s legal exposure if the blogger makes a mistake. Driving Traffic: With so many company bloggers to choose from, Indium misses an opportunity to drive cross-traffic by not having its bloggers link to other Indium bloggers. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 36
  • 37. INDIUM’S BLOGS: WHEN CONNECTIONS COUNT DRIVING USERS DRIVING USERS TO THE BLOGS TO THE BLOGS Indium prominently RSS feeds and features the blogs on blog rolls help its corporate Web site, users quickly which drives traffic and easily stay by emphasizing the up to date and importance Indium keep leads in the places on connecting pipeline. with customers. USING A PERSONAL TOUCH Including the names, pictures, and biographies of bloggers helps to “humanize” Indium, driving customer engagement. Source: Indium Corporation; http://www.indium.com/blogs/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 37
  • 38. INDIUM’S BLOGS: WHEN CONNECTIONS COUNT DRIVING INTERACTION DISPLAYING A Quizzes, polls, CLEAR CALL surveys, and TO ACTION other widgets Linking to relevant drive customer upcoming engagement. events drives traffic to offline venues where representatives of the company can move them along RESPONDING the purchase cycle. TO USERS Showcasing blogger responses to reader comments demonstrates how the company is implementing user suggestions. Source: Indium Corporation; http://www.indium.com/blogs/Dr-Lasky-Blog/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 38
  • 39. MARRIOTT’S “ON THE MOVE” WHO IT IS Marriott is an international hospitality company. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current and Potential Customers: Travelers WHAT IT DID To build brand awareness, the company’s CEO, Bill Marriott, discusses recent events at Marriott and reflects on his personal experiences. Source: Marriott. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 39
  • 40. MARRIOTT’S “ON THE MOVE” WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Making a Personal Connection: “On the move” has a clearly defined author and personality, facilitating a sense of personal connection between the blogger and the readers and attachment to the brand as symbolized by Bill Marriott. Driving Traffic Across Platforms: Marriott provides clear links to other relevant Marriott Web sites, including its “Marriott in the Kitchen” blog, ensuring that each site builds on the success of the others. Providing Other Formats: The blog also provides recordings of the blog entries so that users can choose to listen to the entries rather than reading them, smoothing the user experience and increasing the user attachment to Bill Marriott through voice. Suggesting Similar Content: Directing users to content similar to their current interest increases the stickiness of the site. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Blogger Loyalty, Not Company Loyalty: Because “on the move” relies on the personality of one employee, it also relies on the presence of that employee at the company to maintain blog readership. Lack of Responses: Marriott does not take the opportunity to respond to comments, contributing to reader disengagement. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 40
  • 41. MARRIOTT’S “ON THE MOVE” SUGGESTING DRIVING SIMILAR TRAFFIC ACROSS CONTENT PLATFORMS Categorizing blog Linking to other entries by topic Marriott sites helps users find and blogs drives more information traffic across on the topic they platforms and are interested in, helps users find increasing the the most relevant amount of time information. spent on the site. Source: Marriott. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 41
  • 42. MARRIOTT’S “ON THE MOVE” MAKING A PROVIDING OTHER PERSONAL FORMATS CONNECTION Blog entries are Bill Marriott isn’t recorded, allowing afraid to address users to interact personal experiences with whichever in his blog, putting format they are a human face on most comfortable. Marriott. He also ends each of his blog entries in the same way, creating a sense of continuity to which users can develop an attachment. Source: Marriott. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 42
  • 43. CORPORATE BLOGS: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined a corporate blog is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Establish your corporate blog strategy. Template  p. 44 STEP 2: Identify the first person (or people) to blog for your company. Checklist  p. 45 STEP 3: Select your blogging technology platform. Scorecard  p. 46 STEP 4: Develop an editorial calendar to establish a regular posting cadence. Template  p. 47 STEP 5: Create a plan for driving traffic to your blog. Ideas  p. 48 Additional Tools: ■ Suggested Metrics  p. 97 ■ Social Media Use Policies and Response Guidelines  p. 101 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 43
  • 44. SAMPLE CORPORATE BLOG STRATEGY 1. Audiences: Whom do you plan to reach and influence with your blog? ■ Current Customers ■ Social Media (Bloggers, etc.) ■ Mainstream Media (Print, ■ Prospective Customers ■ Suppliers/Vendors Broadcast) 2. Objectives: What do you intend to achieve with your blog? ■ Drive Web Traffic ■ Educate and Inform Audiences ■ Revitalize Brand Image ■ Collaborate with Customers ■ Generate Sales Leads ■ Enhance Positioning as Innovator/Thought Leader 3. Content: What relevant, timely topics do you plan to publish? ■ Insights ■ Announcements ■ New Product Offerings ■ Views on the News ■ Industry Trends ■ Company Happenings 4. Content Creation: Who is going to create/edit all of this content? ■ CEO ■ Junior Staff ■ Other Senior Leaders ■ CMO ■ Our Agency ■ Other: ____________________ 5. Frequency: How often do you plan to post? ■ Daily ■ Weekly ■ Monthly ■ Two to Three Times per Week ■ Biweekly ■ Quarterly 6. Measurement: What will success look like? ■ Number of Comments ■ Number of Blog Mentions ■ Increase in Newsletter Forwards ■ Number of Readers ■ Increase in Web Traffic ■ Other: ____________________ 7. Promotion: How will we drive traffic to the blog? ■ Customer Newsletter ■ Trade Publications ■ Other Social Media Platforms ■ E-Mail Marketing Push ■ Company Web Site ■ Other: ____________________ From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 44
  • 45. CORPORATE BLOGGER APPROPRIATENESS SCREEN Is this person empowered to speak on behalf of your brand? Do you trust this person to respond to audience comments in an accurate and timely manner? Is this person a credible voice for your firm? Is this person a subject matter expert? Does this person have a genuine/authentic voice? Is this person excited about blogging? Does this person have the time to dedicate to blogging (est. two to eight hours/week)? Will this person continue to have time for blogging in the foreseeable future? Is this person committed to continuing on in this role at your company for the next 12 months? From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 45
  • 46. BLOGGING PLATFORM EVALUATION SCORECARD KEY CRITERIA TO CONSIDER Promotion/Tracking Capabilities ■ Does this site submit to major blog tracking sites Cost (e.g., Technorati, Google Alert)? ■ Does this platform offer different tiers of service? ■ How quickly does the platform index in search engines? ■ What initial start-up costs will you incur (e.g., custom ■ Is this platform the industry standard for your business? setup, domain name registration)? ■ Does this platform provide basic monitoring stats ■ What ongoing costs can you expect (e.g., yearly (e.g., traffic, referrer, trackbacks)? registration fees, hosting fees)? ■ Does this platform support RSS feeds? ■ Does this platform allow word or IP banning? Blog Design and Management Tools ■ Is this platform easy for your blogger(s) to use Technical Support (e.g., spell check, preview function, file types accepted)? ■ Is this platform intuitive for your audience to use ■ Does this platform offer 24-hour customer support? (e.g., search function, archive, navigation options)? ■ During what hours of the day does this platform ■ Can this platform integrate seamlessly with my conduct routine maintenance? company Web site? ■ Does this platform provide tutorials to help you educate ■ How customizable is this platform (e.g., widgets, audio, your staff on how to use the service? video)? ■ Does this platform work well on a mobile device? ■ Does this platform work well on your audience’s preferred Web browser? ■ Does this platform employ any spam blockers? From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 46
  • 47. EDITORIAL CALENDAR: COMPANY BLOG MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Topic Keywords/Tags Links to Include ■ Past Blog Posts ■ Third-Party Blogs ■ Whitepapers ■ Product Pages ■ News Articles Features of Post ■ Photo Upload ■ Video Upload ■ Podcast Component ■ User Survey/Quick Poll ■ Widget/Application Component ■ Live Chat From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 47
  • 48. BLOG PROMOTION PLAN INTERNAL PROMOTION VEHICLES Cross-promote your blog on your company Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc., accounts. Ask employees to include your blog URL in their e-mail signature. Include a link to your company blog in company communications (e.g., press releases, whitepapers). Include a link to your company blog in your next e-mail marketing campaign or customer newsletter. EXTERNAL PROMOTION VEHICLES Submit your URL to blog search sites and directories (e.g., Technorati, MyBlogLog). Comment on other industry blogs and link back your own blog. Link to others’ blogs in your blog posts or include them on your blog roll. Post an interview or invite a well-known blogger in your industry to write a guest post. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 48
  • 49. TWITTER WHAT TWITTER IS Twitter is a micro-blogging service that allows users to post or publish brief messages of 140 characters or less (“tweets”). WHAT TWITTER HELPS YOU DO ■ Talk to your users by keeping them updated with quick new blasts. ■ Animate your users to boost brand awareness and visibility. ■ List to your users by following them on Twitter. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ United Linen .....................................................................................................................p. 51 ■ Progress Software .........................................................................................................p. 54 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 49
  • 50. TWITTER IS TWITTER RIGHT FOR YOU? Do you want to link users to other content or to your other social media sites? Tweets make it easy to share quick updates and other information with users. Do you have employees who can regularly devote time to maintaining your Twitter account? Twitter needs to be updated regularly by a user who is excited about the content and the medium. Is your industry “Twitter friendly”? Have you seen other competitors or thought leaders in your space succeed using Twitter? Searching for industry terms, your name, and your competitors’ names in Twitter will let you know if your target demographic is present and how active they are. Do you have a steady cadence of news/insight to share with your audience? Twitter accounts rely on a stream of brief insights and links to keep audience engagement high. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 50
  • 51. UNITED LINENS’ TWITTER WHO IT IS United Linen is a provider of linen and uniform products and services. WHO IT IS TARGETING Customers and Potential Customers: Restaurant Owners WHAT IT DID To drive customer engagement, United Linen Source: Twitter. uses Twitter to share interesting articles and events and to interact with users one on one. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 51
  • 52. UNITED LINEN’S TWITTER WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Interacting One on One: Sending personal messages to other users increases user engagement. Integrating of Offline and Online Channels: United Linen uses Twitter to drive offline interactions with possible customers, driving lead generation. Leveraging Specific Customer Knowledge: Targeting a customer with specific content demonstrates knowledge of their customer’s business, driving customer loyalty. Monitoring and Responding to the Conversation: Reaching out to users twittering about their company gives United Linen input into the conversation. Ensuring a Content Value-Add: Passing along relevant information to customers increases the value of the Twitter account to the users. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Small Customer Base: United Linen has a small and specific customer base, so it may have to proactively reach out to its customers on Twitter rather than relying on its customers finding it to build a critical base. Twitterer Loyalty, Not Company Loyalty: The Twitter account relies on the personality of its marketing director, Scott Townsend, to drive visits. If Mr. Townsend leaves the company, United Linen may have trouble transferring that loyalty to its next Twitter user. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 52
  • 53. UNITED LINEN’S TWITTER INTERACTING MONITORING AND ONE ON ONE RESPONDING TO THE Sending personal CONVERSATION messages to other Reaching out to users users increases user twittering about their engagement. company gives United Linen input into the conversation. INTEGRATING OF OFFLINE AND ONLINE CHANNELS United Linen uses Twitter to drive offline interactions with possible customers, driving lead generation. ENSURING A CONTENT VALUE-ADD Passing along relevant LEVERAGING information to SPECIFIC CUSTOMER customers increases KNOWLEDGE the value of the Twitter Targeting a customer account to the users. with specific content demonstrates knowledge of its customer’s business, driving customer loyalty. Source: Twitter. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 53
  • 54. PROGRESS SOFTWARE’S TWITTER WHO IT IS Progress Software is a provider of application infrastructure software. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current and Potential Customers: Software Users WHAT IT DID To drive brand awareness, Progress Software uses its twitter account to direct readers to papers and articles relevant to its industry. Source: Twitter. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 54
  • 55. PROGRESS SOFTWARE’S TWITTER WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Frequent Posts: Progress Software has a good frequency of posts, ranging from zero to five a day and never going more than two or three days without posting, driving customer engagement. Encouraging Use of Other Platforms: Progress Software uses its Twitter to link to its other social media platforms, driving traffic across all platforms and cutting down on the need for content generation. Displaying Knowledge of the Community: Progress Software often “retweets” links from other users (reposting links that other Twitter users have posted), which drives customer engagement and positions Progress Software as involved in the thought leadership community. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Balancing Company and Third-Party Content: While retweeting is an excellent way of driving user engagement, it must be balanced with Progress Software content to ensure that the company’s value proposition is highlighted. Impersonal Account: Progress Software does not identify the person behind the Twitter account, which may hinder its ability to develop a personal connection with its followers. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 55
  • 56. PROGRESS SOFTWARE’S TWITTER ENCOURAGING USE OF OTHER PLATFORMS Highlighting other ways to get in touch with Progress drives traffic across platforms. DISPLAYING KNOWLEDGE OF THE COMMUNITY Retweeting interesting articles involves Progress in the community, driving user engagement and demonstrating Source: Twitter. involvement with thought leaders. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 56
  • 57. TWITTER: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined Twitter is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Explore the platform: search for your name, your competitors’ names, and any other terms that will give you an idea of how the conversation around your industry is taking place. STEP 2: Develop a content and marketing strategy for your Twitter account. STEP 3: Develop guidelines for when to respond to user comments. STEP 4: Adopt your tone to that of your users. STEP 5: Follow other users on Twitter (both your customers and thought leaders in your field) and retweet interesting content that they post. Additional Tools: ■ Twitter Dictionary  p. 58 ■ Twitter Guidelines  p. 59 ■ Sample Twitter Monitoring Tools  p. 60 ■ Sample Twitter Management Tools  p. 61 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 57
  • 58. TWITTER DICTIONARY ■ Following: To receive messages on Twitter, you follow other people and companies you’re interested in, which means you get their messages as they post. Conversely, people get your messages by following you. ■ Tweet: Users refer to an individual message as a tweet, alternatives include “post,” “message,” and “update.” ■ @username: On Twitter, @username automatically becomes a link to that person’s account, helping people discover each other within the system. ■ DM: Direct message, Twitter’s private messaging channel, DMs do not appear in either a person’s public timeline or in search results. ■ RT: Retweet; a way to share cool ideas via Twitter and to give a shoutout to people you find interesting. You can repost their messages to give them credit. ■ Trending Topics: On the right side of your screen and on the Twitter search page, you’ll see Trending Topics, which are the most-mentioned terms on Twitter at the moment. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 58
  • 59. TWITTER GUIDELINES ■ Don’t freight-train (stack) a bunch of tweets together; space them out as appropriate throughout the day unless linked by theme. ■ Prepare timely news response tweets. If an economic report is due to come out tomorrow, get some material ready that will cover the most likely possibilities. Then be ready to tweet about them when the stories hit. ■ Make sure your profile is set up properly. Your profile should succinctly describe your brand and display the picture and name of person who runs your Twitter account, his or her e-mail address, and your Web site address. ■ Keep up with your followers. It’s good Twitter etiquette to follow back anyone who follows you. If a customer or prospective customer follows your account, it’s appropriate to direct message (DM) them a “thank you.” ■ No title-less links: Tell people where that bit.ly link sends them; “This is smart: http://bit.ly/blahblah” may waste readers’ time because they don’t have enough information to know if the article is relevant. Instead, say, “Hiring people named Ted is smart business (WSJ): http://bit.ly/b...” to give them context before they click. ■ Make sure all materials are accessible. Avoid linking to attachments or content that needs a password. Many people get Twitter via text message, which makes it difficult to access PDFs and time-consuming to log in to other sites. ■ Use hashtags to categorize your messages. Using a hashtag (#symbol) lets viewers sort Tweets with a common topic. Adding a hashtag to events like webinars and conferences (eg., #SOCM) makes it easy for attendees to use Twitter to share their thoughts about the material in realtime. Just make sure your hashtag is short (less than eight characters is best) and unclaimed (use the Twitter search function to sniff out available tags). ■ Promote your followers. Follow interesting people and check out what your followers have to say. Retweet the coolest things you’re hearing (repost the Tweet with RT@username) to show you’re engaged with the community, not just trying to toot your own horn. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 59
  • 60. SAMPLE TWITTER MONITORING TOOLS ■ Monitter: A real-time monitoring application that offers a high-level view of what people are talking about on Twitter ■ Tweetburner: A trackback application that provides stats on click-thrus for links shared via Twitter ■ TweetDeck: A personal browser that acts as “your air traffic control for Twitter,” allowing you to simultaneously monitor your Twitter, Facebook, and MySpace accounts ■ TweetLater: A daily e-mail digest of Twitter activity based on specified keywords, allowing you to easily track trends and topics of interest ■ Twendz: A tool from PR agency Waggerner Edstrom that provides user sentiment tracking using a real-time Twitterstream ■ Twhirl: A desktop client that lets you monitor your Twitter account, find Tweets mentioning your @username, and search Twitter posts in real time ■ TwitterFox: A Firefox Web browser plug-in that allows you to view Tweets in a pop-up window within your standard Web browser, eliminating the need to continually visit Twitter.com From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 60
  • 61. SAMPLE TWITTER MANAGEMENT TOOLS ■ CoTweet: Joint twittering application that lets multiple individuals use the same Twitter account by automatically adding their initials to the tweets they make while representing your brand ■ Ping.fm: Web site that allows you to simultaneously post updates across ALL of your social media sites (eg., LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter) in one single step ■ Twitter for Facebook: Application that directly forwards your Twitter updates to your Facebook profile From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 61
  • 62. ONLINE VIDEOS WHAT THEY ARE Short videos that are easily sharable between individuals on the Internet WHAT THEY HELP YOU DO ■ Talk with your users by engaging, entertaining, and educating them. ■ Animate your users to drive viral marketing. ■ Animate your users to boost brand awareness and visibility. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ Johnson & Johnson .......................................................................................................p. 64 ■ DuPont .................................................................................................................................p. 68 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 62
  • 63. ONLINE VIDEOS ARE ONLINE VIDEOS RIGHT FOR YOU? Do you want to combine informational and entertaining content? Online videos provide an excellent medium to inform and entertain users. Do you want to make your content easily sharable? Users are used to sharing online videos, making it easy to capitalize on current habits. Do you have a creative take on the videos? Since users have so many options, they will not watch your videos unless the videos provide new information or present the information in a captivating way. Do you have videos produced for offline channels (ads, etc.) that would work well in an online medium? Using offline videos to populate your online channels cuts down on content generation; however, they must be vetted for length and content to ensure that they are right for the medium. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 63
  • 64. JOHNSON & JOHNSON’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL WHO IT IS Johnson & Johnson is a health care and consumer packaged goods manufacturer. WHO IT IS TARGETING Industry Enthusiasts: Health Care Users WHAT IT DID To raise brand awareness, Johnson & Johnson posts a wide range of videos on its YouTube channel. Source: Johnson & Johnson; http://www.youtube.com/user/JNJhealth. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 64
  • 65. JOHNSON & JOHNSON’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Playing by the Rules: Since it is acting in a heavily regulated industry, Johnson & Johnson focuses mainly on informing users about health care issues, facilitating engagement without legal entanglements. Ensuring Diverse Content: Johnson & Johnson uses a mix of videos produced specifically for the Web and appropriate clips taken from other mediums to ensure a wide range of content with minimal production, allowing it to increase brand awareness for a wide audience. Monitoring of and Involvement in the Community: Johnson & Johnson subscribes to other YouTube channels and comments on the videos of its subscribers, driving customer engagement. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Lack of Written Information: Johnson & Johnson uses most of its “About Me” section for its disclaimer. While Johnson & Johnson needs to protect itself legally, it misses out on the opportunity to share additional content with the user. Slow Response Time: Because Johnson & Johnson has so many videos to monitor and operates in a highly regulated industry, it is difficult to respond quickly to user comments. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 65
  • 66. JOHNSON & JOHNSON’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL PLAYING BY MONITORING THE RULES OF AND The legal INVOLVEMENT IN disclaimer must be THE COMMUNITY carefully placed Subscribing to the to ensure that it videos of others does not detract and commenting from content and upon them that Johnson drives customer & Johnson is engagement. protected. Source: Johnson & Johnson; http://www.youtube.com/user/JNJhealth. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 66
  • 67. JOHNSON & JOHNSON’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL ENSURING DIVERSE CONTENT Johnson & Johnson reposts existing video that it has determined is right for YouTube, cutting down on the expense of content generation. Maintaining a wide range of videos helps Johnson & Johnson increase brand awareness among a wide audience. Source: Johnson & Johnson; http://www.youtube.com/user/JNJhealth. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 67
  • 68. DUPONT’S SCIENCE STORIES WHO IT IS DuPont is a chemical company. WHO IT IS TARGETING Industry Enthusiasts: Science Fans WHAT IT DID To increase brand awareness, DuPont created a series of videos modeled after children’s after-school shows that presented the science behind its products. Source: DuPont; http://www2.dupont.com/Stories/en_US/index.html. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 68
  • 69. DUPONT’S SCIENCE STORIES WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Finding an Original, Humorous Take: Using the format of children’s televisions shows presents the content in a familiar and captivating way, driving customer engagement and word of mouth. Putting the Competition to the Test: DuPont uses the videos to compare its products with those of its competitors, allowing it to demonstrate its superiority visually and scientifically, clearly differentiating its product. Reusing Appropriate Content: Much of the content in the videos is repurposed from DuPont’s archives, cutting down on the costs of content generation. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Blogger Involvement: Encouraging bloggers to post the videos on their sites may undermine the impartiality and influence of those bloggers. DuPont overcame this barrier by paying for video placement on blogs as if these videos were conventional ads. Integration with Web Site: DuPont relies on other social media platforms to promote the videos but misses an opportunity to promote the videos on its Web site, where they are difficult to find. Source: BDI Conference; Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 69
  • 70. DUPONT’S SCIENCE STORIES FINDING AN ORIGINAL TAKE BEING SILLY Putting the videos in the Having a sense of humor format of a children’s about what it is doing educational television show humanizes DuPont. allows users to interact with a familiar and beloved format, driving customer engagement. Source: DuPont; http://www2.dupont.com/Stories/en_US/firefighters.html. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 70
  • 71. DUPONT’S SCIENCE STORIES Source: DuPont; http://www2.dupont.com/Stories/en_US/firefighters.html. Source: DuPont; http://www2.dupont.com/Stories/en_US/firefighters.html. REUSING APPROPRIATE CONTENT PUTTING THE COMPETITION TO THE TEST DuPont uses videos of product tests and other archived DuPont uses the videos to compare its products with footage to show DuPont products in action, which drives those of its competitors, allowing it to demonstrate down costs. its superiority visually and scientifically, clearly differentiating its product. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 71
  • 72. ONLINE VIDEOS: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined online video is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Develop a content strategy that focuses on originality and a casual tone. STEP 2: Make it easy for users to sort through videos and find what interests them. STEP 3: Develop guidelines for when to respond to user comments. STEP 4: Develop a strategy to drive users to your video. STEP 5: Promote your video on other social media and Web platforms. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 72
  • 73. VIRTUAL WORLDS WHAT THEY ARE A virtual environment where users can interact with each other through “avatars,” Internet representations of themselves WHAT IT HELPS YOU DO ■ Absorb user information by immersing them in a more interactive experience. ■ Absorb by engaging and collaborating with audience. ■ Talk to your users by conducting many traditional offline experiences online. ■ Listen to your users by conducting real-time virtual conversations with them. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ Cisco .....................................................................................................................................p. 75 ■ Wells Fargo ........................................................................................................................p. 79 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 73
  • 74. VIRTUAL WORLDS ARE VIRTUAL WORLDS RIGHT FOR YOU? Are you willing to invest the time and money into building and maintaining a virtual world? Virtual worlds are inherently expensive and time-consuming. Are your target users involved in or willing to be drawn to virtual worlds? Virtual worlds can be intimidating to many users, so you must ensure that virtual worlds are attractive to your users before becoming involved. Are you willing to give up a large amount of control over what happens in your environment? You will have no control over user interactions since they happen in real time. Are you trying to create an immersive experience for your users? Virtual worlds allow you to bring offline experiences like lectures, speeches, and training sessions to users at their computers. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 74
  • 75. CISCO: SECOND LIFE AND VIRTUAL WORLD WHO IT IS Cisco is a networking and communications technology and services company. WHO IT IS TARGETING Purchase Influencers: Engineers WHAT IT DID To drive user engagement, Cisco established a presence in Second Life, the most popular non-branded virtual world, and built its own branded virtual world. Source: Cisco From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 75
  • 76. CISCO: SECOND LIFE AND VIRTUAL WORLD WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Going to Its Customers: Cisco chooses a platform (Second Life) where its customers already have a presence rather than trying to draw them to a new one, allowing them to capitalize on a community with built-in loyalty. Experimentation: Cisco tried out virtual worlds in Second Life before building its own, ensuring that the investment had an acceptable ROI. Seeking Customer Feedback: Cisco’s launches of products in Second Life let users be the first “in the know” and allow Cisco to get feedback from its target customers, increasing customer engagement and customer understanding. Identifying Employees: Clearly identifying Cisco employees ensures that the company is operating openly and transparently, driving customer trust. Rewarding Productive Community Members: Rewarding users for providing feedback gives them an incentive to exchange information and increases customer understanding. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Managing Expectations: By launching products in Second Life and encouraging feedback, Cisco may give customers a sense that they have more control over the product than they do, leading to disappointment when the real-world product does not meet their expectations. Sizable Investment, Shifting Customer Preferences: Cisco must guard against the risk that users will decide to move on to a new platform in order to protect its investment in the space. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 76
  • 77. CISCO: SECOND LIFE AND VIRTUAL WORLD PERSONALIZING USER INTERACTIONS INTEGRATING Allowing users to fill out ACROSS PLATFORMS a profile, join groups, Linking to other social and search for other networking sites helps users whose profiles drive traffic across match theirs drives platforms. customer engagement within the community. DRIVING WORD-OF- MOUTH MARKETING “Invite a Friend button” facilitates user-to- user endorsements, driving word-of-mouth marketing. REWARDING PRODUCTIVE COMMUNITY MEMBERS Rewarding users for providing feedback gives them an incentive to exchange information and increases customer understanding. Source: Cisco. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 77
  • 78. CISCO: SECOND LIFE AND VIRTUAL WORLD GOING TO ITS CUSTOMERS SEEKING CUSTOMER FEEDBACK Cisco chooses a platform its Product launches in Second Life customers are already using, let users be the first “in the know,” which cuts down on marketing increasing customer engagement and promotion costs. and driving customer understanding through seeking feedback. IDENTIFYING EMPLOYEES Cisco employees are clearly identified, removing any sense of being “watched” by the company. Source: Cisco. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 78
  • 79. WELLS FARGO: STAGECOACH ISLAND WHO IT IS Wells Fargo is a financial services company. WHO IT IS TARGETING Potential Customers: Young Adults WHAT IT DID To drive financial education and engagement, Wells Fargo created an online world where young adults can learn about fiscal responsibility. Source: Wells Fargo. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 79
  • 80. WELLS FARGO: STAGECOACH ISLAND WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Picking Platform Based on Business Objectives: Stagecoach Island exposes young adults to the issues of money management through interactive games at a time when they have not yet chosen a bank, driving future lead generation. Adapting to Their User: Since young adults are already using virtual worlds, they will be more likely to try out Stagecoach Island, ensuring that Wells Fargo has a critical mass of users. Subtle Corporate Presence: Wells Fargo keeps in world branding to a minimum to avoid driving away users while still increasing brand awareness. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Legal Issues: Any site targeted at young adults that encourages social networking will have to ensure a suitable environment for their age group. Virtual worlds make this more difficult since the company has little control over the real-time interactions. Attracting Users to a Stand-Alone Site: Drawing young adult users to a stand-alone virtual world requires a thoughtful promotion plan. Constant Updates: Worlds directed at young adults require more maintenance and updates than other worlds as this demographic puts a higher premium on new content. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 80
  • 81. WELLS FARGO: STAGECOACH ISLAND Source: Wells Fargo. Source: Wells Fargo. SUBTLE CORPORATE PRESENCE PICKING PLATFORM BASED ON BUSINESS OBJECTIVES Users are given a savings account (and later earn their way The game teaches users about financial responsibility via to a checking account and credit card with which to make interactive learning modules and the practical application of purchases), driving brand awareness and subtle association new skills. of Wells Fargo with financial services. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 81
  • 82. WELLS FARGO: STAGECOACH ISLAND Source: Wells Fargo. ADAPTING TO THEIR USER Wells Fargo tailors the appearance of the avatars to the young adult market, increasing the world’s “cool factor” and user engagement. Source: Wells Fargo. SUBTLE CORPORATE PRESENCE ATMs and credit cards provide minimal Wells Fargo branding in the game, which trains users to associate Wells Fargo with those objects. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 82
  • 83. VIRTUAL WORLDS: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined a virtual world is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Spend some time in other virtual worlds to get to know the medium, the users, and the expected behavior in the platform. STEP 2: Decide what your goal for the virtual world is (customer feedback, customer training, etc.). STEP 3: Decide what level of investment your company is comfortable with and design your presence and/or world accordingly. STEP 4: Find employees who are excited about the medium to maintain a presence in the world to interact with users. STEP 5: Develop a strategy to drive users to your world. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 83
  • 84. WIKIS WHAT THEY ARE Wikis are Web applications, similar to Internet message boards, that allow users to openly add and edit content. WHAT THEY HELP YOU DO ■ Talk by sharing product information with customers. ■ Absorb by enabling user networking and collaborating with users to cocreate information repositories. ■ Listen by reading customer-generated content. WHO IS DOING IT RIGHT ■ Intuit ......................................................................................................................................p. 85 ■ Ford .......................................................................................................................................p. 89 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 84
  • 85. WIKIS ARE WIKIS RIGHT FOR YOU? Do your target users have an extensive knowledge base that other users would like access to? Wikis work best when users are dealing with complicated or knowledge-intensive issues that require a large amount of research. Do you want to share a wide range of content without having to constantly update with new information? Wikis allow companies to leverage the knowledge base of their customers to provide value without creating a large content burden. Are you willing to surrender a certain amount of control over content? Unless the information is incorrect or misleading, companies should not interfere with the content being provided on the wiki. Are you trying to solicit customer input on a specific subject? Wikis are an easy way to get and synthesize customer input on a subject. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 85
  • 86. INTUIT’S TAX ALMANAC WHO IT IS Intuit is a software company that develops financial and tax preparation software and related services for small businesses, accountants, and individuals. WHO IT IS TARGETING Current and Potential Customers: Tax Professionals WHAT IT DID To answer customers’ questions about taxes, Intuit established a wiki to gather the knowledge of the professional tax community. Source: Intuit. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 86
  • 87. INTUIT’S TAX ALMANAC WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Prepopulation of Articles: Intuit prepopulated the wiki with 150 articles so that users would find good content when the wiki opened, ensuring that the site would provide immediate value. Limiting Certain Edits: By “locking” certain pages and not allowing them to be edited by users, Intuit guaranteed that nonsubjective content like government regulations would be accurate, cutting down on its monitoring burden. Importing Other Relevant Content: Intuit also links to important updates and news to keep users of the wiki up to date, driving revisits. Subtle Corporate Presence: Intuit minimizes its corporate presence so as not to overwhelm customers with company branding. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Balance Between Corporate and User Content: Intuit must tread a fine line between its customers losing sight of its brand and overwhelming them with its brand. Reliance on Active and Informed Users: Intuit depends on well informed and involved users finding and becoming involved with their wiki to ensure a steady stream of useful content. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 87
  • 88. INTUIT’S TAX ALMANAC FEATURING IMPORTING CONTENT OTHER RELEVANT Featured articles help INFORMATION users find the most Highlighting important interesting content, news keeps users up to increasing customer date and increases the engagement. value proposition of the wiki, increasing revisits. Source: Intuit. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 88
  • 89. INTUIT’S TAX ALMANAC CATERING TO USER PROVIDING EXPECTATIONS VALUE BEYOND User expectations NETWORKING for graphics in a wiki Gathering relevant are low, which allows research, government Intuit to keep things regulations, and simple and cut down articles in one location on costs. eases the burden for tax professionals, driving customer loyalty. Source: Intuit. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 89
  • 90. FORD’S WHERE ARE THE JONESES? WHO IT IS Ford is an auto maker. WHO IT IS TARGETING New Customer Segment: Young and Tech-Savvy WHAT IT DID To increase brand visibility, Ford sponsored the “webcom,” an online sitcom, “Where are the Joneses?” The sitcom script came from the ideas that users posted to the “Where are the Joneses?” wiki. Source: Ford Motor Company. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 90
  • 91. FORD’S WHERE ARE THE JONESES? WHAT IT IS DOING RIGHT Increasing User Involvement with the Brand: Involving users in the development of the campaign increases brand attachment and drives preference. Integration Across Platforms: Ford posts material from the webcom across several platforms, including Facebook, iTunes, Twitter, and Flickr, increasing brand awareness and driving traffic across platforms. Experimentation: Ford used the campaign to experiment with a variety of social media platforms upping the chances of success of future campaigns. Minimizing the Corporate Presence: Ford’s presence is light and does not interfere with the project, avoiding driving away users. RISKS IT IS UP AGAINST Setting Expectations: Users may become frustrated when the content they suggest is not used for the webcom, so Ford must mitigate the risk of user backlash. Driving and Sustaining Interest: Ford runs the risk that it is out in front of its target users, experimenting on social media platforms its target audience is unfamiliar with. Source: Marketing Leadership Council research. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 91
  • 92. FORD’S WHERE ARE THE JONESES? INCREASING USER INVOLVEMENT INCREASING USER Offering users INPUT the chance to be Incorporating user ideas featured, whether into the “webcom” online or offline, script lets users increases customer cocreate the campaign, engagement. increasing their brand preference. Source: Ford Motor Company. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 92
  • 93. FORD’S WHERE ARE THE JONESES? HAVING GOOD SITE MINIMIZING THE MAINTENANCE CORPORATE If sites are kept up PRESENCE after the campaign Ford kept sponsorship or projects are unobtrusive so as not to finished, links must be interrupt the experience. maintained to avoid frustrating users who stumble across the page later. Source: Ford Motor Company. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 93
  • 94. WIKIS: HOW TO GET STARTED Once you’ve determined a wiki is right for your company, do the following: STEP 1: Identify potential topic areas where users want to network with each other and you. STEP 2: Decide what level of control you will allow users to have over various pieces of content. STEP 3: Prepopulate the wiki with some articles to ensure that the first users have content to build on. STEP 4: Develop a strategy to market your wiki and to draw in target users. STEP 5: Monitor content to ensure that it is up to date and correct. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 94
  • 95. APPENDIX ■ Commonly Cited Social Media Metrics ................................................................p. 96 ■ Social Media Press Release Examples ..................................................................p. 97 ■ Social Media Policy Examples – Employee Use ...............................................................................................................p. 99 – Response Guidelines .................................................................................................p. 100 – User Code of Conduct ..............................................................................................p. 105 ■ Social Media Job Descriptions .................................................................................p. 108 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 95
  • 96. COMMONLY CITED SOCIAL MEDIA METRICS Key Questions for Metrics Selection ■ What objectives are we trying to accomplish? ■ Will the metric help to determine our progress toward the objective? ■ What decisions are dependent on the metric? ■ Is the metric objective and precise? ■ Is the metric reliable? ■ How much will it cost to measure? Do the benefits of the metric outweigh these costs? ■ How often do we need to measure? How long does it take to collect? Does timeliness matter? Most Frequently Cited Metrics By Category Followership Audience Engagement Company References ■ Number of Friends/Followers/Fans ■ Comments/Responses ■ Posts/Mentions/Conversations ■ Active User Growth/Churn ■ Return Visits ■ Trackbacks Web Traffic Metrics Audience Impressions Commercial Outcomes ■ Click-Throughs/Referrals ■ Tone/Promoters vs. Detractors ■ Service Issues Resolved ■ Site Traffic ■ Satisfaction/Net Promoter Score ■ Sales Conversions Content Resonance Word-of-Mouth Metrics Other Metrics ■ Views/Hits/Downloads ■ Retweets ■ Share of Voice ■ Time Spent on Site ■ WOM Spread ■ Employee Adoption/Usage From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 96
  • 97. SOCIAL MEDIA PRESS RELEASE EXAMPLES Shift Communications Template, Version 1.0 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 97
  • 98. SOCIAL MEDIA PRESS RELEASE EXAMPLES (CONTINUED) Shift Communications Template, Version 1.5 From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 98
  • 99. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: EMPLOYEE USE From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 99
  • 100. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: RESPONSE GUIDELINES From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 100
  • 101. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: RESPONSE GUIDELINES (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 101
  • 102. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: RESPONSE GUIDELINES (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 102
  • 103. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: RESPONSE GUIDELINES (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 103
  • 104. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: RESPONSE GUIDELINES (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 104
  • 105. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: USER CODE OF CONDUCT From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 105
  • 106. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: USER CODE OF CONDUCT (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 106
  • 107. SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY EXAMPLES: USER CODE OF CONDUCT (CONTINUED) From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 107
  • 108. KODAK’S CHIEF LISTENING OFFICER JOB DESCRIPTION KODAK: Chief Listener—Social Media Team Position Summary ■ Optimize and use tools to monitor online conversations related to Kodak products, services, and brand in all social media channels including Twitter, blogs, forums, video sites, Facebook, etc. ■ Route issues team (KodakCB, Conversation Specialists, Conversation Support, or SPG Marketing Managers) for handling. ■ Work with social media analytics and marketing experts to provide product insights gleaned from monitoring activities. Roles and Responsibilities ■ Work closely with Rochester-based Kodak social media team to ensure coordinated messaging/voice. ■ Optimize Kodak’s monitoring tools to streamline them into efficient data mining sources. ■ Support product launches (e.g., Inkjet in Germany, SMILE campaign) via social media. ■ Feedback issues (support, etc.) for handling where appropriate. ■ Contribute to content generation for use in Kodak social media channels—blog posts, tweets, Facebook updates, video interviews. Required Qualifications ■ “T”-shaped person—Broad (Kodak) and deep ( social media) knowledge ■ Extensive knowledge of new media and Web-/digital-based technologies ■ Social media authority—established presence on Facebook, blogs, Twitter, and LinkedIn ■ Proven ability to apply new media solutions to improve external and internal communications ■ Experience working on and managing complex projects ■ Strong external focus ■ Experience working with both large and small interactive agencies ■ Creative thinker with the ability to develop ideas into executable plans ■ Highly skilled in written and verbal communications ■ Attributes: willingness to experiment, ability to deal with uncertainty, doggedness, determination, sense of humor, persuasiveness, strong listener ■ Well organized with ability to coordinate numerous projects simultaneously ■ High level of interpersonal/teamwork skills ■ Ability to work independently with little supervision with all levels of the organization ■ Ability to meet deadlines ■ A level of analytical ability to provide input and establish measures ■ Cultural sensitivity across global boundaries ■ Applications experience: – Radian6 preferred, not required – Facebook, Twitter, YouTube – Microsoft Office Source: http://www.monster.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 108
  • 109. COACH’S SENIOR MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION Sr. Manager, Social Media/Global Web and Digital Media Department Position Description The senior manager, social media will serve as a strategist and internal evangelist on social media, responsible for articulating social media plans and leading and executing their implementation. This is a newly created position within our new and growing Global Web & Digital Media department. Key Responsibilities ■ Lead strategy for and execute social media campaigns and evaluate results. ■ Set targets and timelines for social media programs and key initiatives and manage its marketing calendar. ■ Deploy social media programs and technology to create innovative and creative campaigns in support of product, brand, and marketing initiatives. ■ Lead efforts to devise system of measurements and key metrics to understand effectiveness in terms of social media penetration and impact of social media reputation and perceptions. ■ Manage budget while hitting performance goals. ■ Develop and maintain a process workflow that ensures consistent execution and delivery of social media marketing campaigns with creative and technology teams. ■ Develop business requirements documents and marketing distribution plans for widgets and social media applications. ■ Develop a set of best practices and devise recommended rules of engagement, helping to build social media capability worldwide. ■ Stay abreast of social media tools and industry trends. ■ Benchmark and research competitor and industry leaders in social media. Qualifications ■ Minimum of five years online work experience required ■ Hands-on experience in managing and/or marketing a Facebook page, MySpace page, or Twitter account preferred ■ Experience managing direct reports required ■ Experience working cross functionally and interacting with partners at all levels ■ Excellent communication, teamwork, and relationship-building skills ■ Ability to evaluate and change priorities daily and to perform efficiently within a fast paced team environment ■ Bachelor’s degree Source: http://jobview.monster.com/Sr-Manager-Social-Media-Global-Web-Digital-Media-Department-Job-New-York-NY-US-83080792.aspx. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 109
  • 110. GMAC’S SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION Job Description Primary Responsibilities GMAC is seeking a social media manager to manage internal and external social media initiatives within the organization. This role will consult and develop innovative Social Media programs based on social media strategy, blogger relations, and viral initiatives. The ideal associate will monitor commentary regarding agency and clients on online through social networks, key blogs, Twitter and forums. The SMM will also engage in and drive discussions related to business priorities on blogs and social networks while educating internal stakeholders on the uses of social media platforms, staying constantly abreast of changes in social media outreach and develop ideas on future trends for distribution to clients and press. Job Requirements and Qualifications ■ Two years in social media and experience in financial industry desired ■ Related industry experience in digital marketing (blogs, online communities) and use of social networking tools—Twitter, Facebook—to promote business objectives ■ Superb communication and interpersonal skills ■ Independent, strategic, and creative thinker who is a flexible team player willing to take on additional responsibilities if necessary Source: https://gmacfs.myvurv.com/MAIN/careerportal/Job_Profile.cfm?szOrderID=10044&szReturnToSearch=1&szWordsToHighlight=. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 110
  • 111. EMC CORPORATION’S SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION Social Media Manager Let’s face it, information and people are the most important assets companies have. EMC’s Content Management and Archiving division is revolutionizing the way companies and their employees, customers, and partners interact with information, and it’s a big deal. As the innovation leader in technology, EMC is active in driving discussion and debate online and across the blogosphere, with no shortage of opinions. We’re looking for a rock star who lives and breathes the social media world and has a solid understanding of all-things social networking: blogs, networks, microblogging, wikis/collaborative software, podcasts—you name it. A true social media expert who has achieved business value results. Reputation management is the name of the game, and you’re an all-star. Roles and Responsibilities ■ Day-to-day monitoring of all social media outlets: pages, sites, blogs, etc. ■ Contributing to and regularly updating our external social sites: Facebook pages/groups, LinkedIn group, MySpace page, Twitter, EMC One, etc. ■ Manages social networking programs to ensure business gets more than fair share of voice ■ Directs voices across CMA to post or respond or tweet on particular topics or in response to other posts/comments; builds “social media” coalitions for optimal results ■ Uses social media during our key events (Twitter, Yammer, etc.) ■ Uses social media as a voice to market around key themes/messages that match our other marketing programs, product launches, etc. ■ Constantly communicates constructive and innovating suggestions on how we use social media tools/sites to increase our voice to market Measures ■ Measurable increase in share of voice overall ■ Increasing numbers of tweets, posts, and other coverage month by month that discuss us and our topics of interest ■ Others to be determined Qualifications/Profile of Desired Individual ■ A subject matter expert on social media tools—knows them, has used them all, understands differences, benefits, etc.—and has ability and patience to educate internal audiences ■ Someone who is strategically minded and would be the type of person a company would hire as a consultant to define/guide a social media strategy. ■ Someone with a network of bloggers/writer for contract hire ■ Someone who is preferably a known name in the social media space (although not required) ■ Someone with a major passion for this as a day-to-day job and will think creatively about how to use these tools to our benefit, will proactively seek out new tools (e.g., Unisfair, Mozes) ■ Strong project management skills; excellent communication skills; ability to work with multiple contributors at various levels. ■ Public relations experience a plus planning and developing strategy around campaigns ■ Understanding of B2B marketing Source: http://jobview.monster.com/Social-Media-Manager-Job-Pleasanton-CA-US-82103764.aspx. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 111
  • 112. DELL’S GLOBAL MARCOM SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION Description The Small and Medium Business Global MarCom team is looking for a strong marketing communications expert to serve as our Social Marketing Vehicle lead. In this capacity, the successful candidate will have responsibility for planning, developing, and implementing a global creative and strategic platform for social marketing campaigns. This includes but is not limited to online and out of home creative, distribution of Dell content through social/emerging MarCom channels, and social site feature and functionality enhancements to promote the sales of Dell product and service offerings. Main Responsibilities The selected candidate will own creative master and strategy development for social marketing, as well as the agency relationship which includes accountability to drive and execute high-quality SMB social marketing creative on time and within budget; in support of Dell’s overall MarCom improvement and online growth goals. Specific ownership examples for this role include the following: ■ Establish and evangelize best practices, provide thought leadership, and build a strategy and creative platform to globalize and maximize effectiveness of social marketing creative efforts ■ Create/maintain/optimize social marketing creative. This includes, maintenance of existing content, and recommending actions for tools/technology/processes to support the business objectives. ■ Deliver scalable global solutions including but not limited to profile pages on top social sites, UGC promotion, Viral Videos, Content Syndication/Marketing, Sponsored UGC/ Blogger sites (SB and MB), DT Channel, Targeted Pages/groups, Contests/Gifts, aligned with CRM [Listen], SM appropriate ads/campaigns, www.dell.com <http://www.dell. com> integration, syndication of TYOP and Dell solutions content, and Digital “out of home” creative. ■ Measure and report on ROI of social marketing investments. ■ Provide regular executive business updates outlining key deliverables, performance, key risks/opportunities, and improvement plans. ■ Support operational effectiveness and opex scaling goals. ■ Test/deploy vehicle improvements, programs, and monetization opportunities. ■ Provide local teams with support for implementation of strategy. ■ Establish strong relationship with social marketers/publishers and effectively manage them to ensure ongoing high-quality support and innovation. Support the following performance goals: ■ Drive awareness and brand affinity. ■ Support customer acquisition, retention, and development as possible. ■ Drive profitable demand and financial contribution (traffic, revenue, and margin). Key Internal Partners: ■ Global and Regional MarCom Teams ■ Global SMB Online Teams ■ Global Site Design, Global Online Programs Key External Partners: ■ Creative and Media Agencies ■ Social/Content Site Leaders Qualifications/Profile of Desired Individual Assignments will be given in the form of objectives, and the candidate must establish goals to meet those objectives. The candidate will be required to make business decisions on own; unguided in a fast-paced business environment. Furthermore, the role will have a high level of interaction with cross-functional teams including regional MarCom planners and media teams, online teams, global MarCom operations team, offline marketing communications, and through direct feedback from customers. This is a strong C2/C3 position and requires proven ability to excel and motivate others in cross-functional team environment, drive for results in often ambiguous situations, strong negotiation stills, organized, and high energy and creativity. A marketing background Source: http://www.monster.com/. From the MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® of the SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE www.mlc.executiveboard.com © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203 112
  • 113. SALES, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PRACTICE MARKETING LEADERSHIP COUNCIL® © 2009 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. MLC8982119203