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Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
Argumentative paper directions
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Argumentative paper directions

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  • 1. Argumentative Paper Should affirmative action still be practiced in the United States? Why or why not?
  • 2. What is an Argument? 1. 2. A spoken, written, or visual text that expresses a point of view. The use of evidence and reason to discover some version of the truth. *Argument is different from persuasion. When you persuade someone you are attempting to change his/her opinion, not necessarily reveal the truth.
  • 3. The Components of an Argument • Claim: A statement that asserts a belief or truth. Most claims require supporting evidence. • Reason: A statement that expands on a claim by offering evidence to support it. • Evidence: material offered to support an argument (facts, data, expert opinion, etc.)
  • 4. The Components of an Argument • Warrant: in Toulmin argument, the statement that establishes the logical connection between the claim and its supporting reason.    Claim: You should not eat that mushroom. Reason: It’s poisonous. Warrant: What is poisonous shouldn’t be eaten.
  • 5. The Components of an Argument • Counterargument: The author’s recognition of the position that opposes their central claim. • Rebuttal: an answer that challenges or refutes a specific claim or charge that objects to the author’s claim.
  • 6. Writing your paper
  • 7. Make your point! Author’s Claim (argument): It’s the thesis statement in argumentative writing.  Statement of position/Opinion statement Position must be clear and direct.  Formula = issue + your position  Cannot be a fact as facts cannot be debated.
  • 8. Why do you feel this way?  Give us the reasons for your position  Why did you choose the position that you did?    Are there other laws that protect minorities? Are minorities still experiencing inequality? Would minorities still have equal opportunities without affirmative action?
  • 9. Prove it!    Opinions are meaningless without the support of evidence, people!! Evidence convinces the audience that your position is the correct one Use reliable sources
  • 10. Be prepared. Consider potential biases of your reader.  Counterclaims should be addressed at some point in the essay. 
  • 11. Be organized. Paragraph 1 – Establish purpose  Paragraphs 2 & 3 – Reasons and support  Paragraph 4 – Address counterclaims  Paragraph 5 – offer additional insight 
  • 12. Include Research  Use the libguide to help you  Beneficial databases and websites have been located for you Include a Works Cited Page  When using in-text citations….     Use quotations around the authors words Put the author’s name in parenthesis AVOID PLAGIARISM

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