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Edward; w3; matrix paper; 08.02.11. Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros. Reference, www.YourBlogorResume.net.
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Edward; w3; matrix paper; 08.02.11. Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros. Reference, www.YourBlogorResume.net.

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Edward F. T. Charfauros, inspiring author, assists fellow students with their presentation for a successful grade. He also blogs upon his own inspiring blog, where you'll discover life changing stuff. …

Edward F. T. Charfauros, inspiring author, assists fellow students with their presentation for a successful grade. He also blogs upon his own inspiring blog, where you'll discover life changing stuff. Sign up for his blog by sending him an email~

Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros. Reference, www.YourBlogorResume.net.

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  • 1. Running head: CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION MATRIX 1 Cross-Cultural Communication Matrix Edward Charfauros Business Communications COM/285 August 2, 2011 Joyce Harada
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  • 3. Cross Cultural Communication Country Canada India Preferred communication style Non-verbal communication practices Business communication norms Strategies to increase cross-cultural 3 communication A consolidation of both North American and British tendencies reflects moderately indirect communication style. Disagreeing openly when necessary Canadians do so tactfully and diplomatically. Essentially realistic relying on common sense. Businesspeople are somewhat informal generally easy-going and polite. Canadians communicate nonverbal expressions only upon adding emphasis to a message, or as part of a personal communication style of an individual. Canadians prefer to communicate by word versus nonverbal expressions. When speaking to someone Canadians prefer an arm’s length distance while enjoying their personal space. Meetings are begun with very little small talk with expectation of exchanging pleasantries. Canadians present important information with facts and figures to substantiate claims and promises. Fundamentally rational and logical thinkers Canadians are not convinced by emotions, passion, or feelings. Indians periodically disagree within the managerial ranks, and are nonconfrontational. Authority figures make all of the decisions. Generally reaching an agreement by someone's word is sufficient. Meetings begin with informal communication. Indians only use nonverbal communication when involving religious beliefs. Taking off his or her shoes before entering a home is demonstrating respect. Table manners are a bit formal always using the right hand to eat. Leaving no food on the plate when finished eating is interpreted as someone whose still hungry and leaving a small amount of food indicates satisfaction. Generally Indians conduct business with people they know. Prior to conducting business long-standing personal relationships are preferred. Going through a third party for an introduction is always recommended. Indians give immediate credibility to the person or people when conducting business. New marketplaces have opened up because of the Internet, and modern technology is allowing people to promote businesses to cultures in new geographic locations. Making it easier to remotely work with people just as it is face-toface. Communication is electronic now making it easy to work with people in other countries as if they are in the neighboring city. As a general rule, people are called the name Don or Dona then their first name during formal occasions. Appointments are mandatory and preferably communicated by telephone or fax in advance. Generally first meetings are formal and used to build relationships. It is normal for several Shaking hands is expected when introduced in person. Men may embrace and pat one other on the shoulder after a relationship has been established. Kissing one another on both cheeks beginning with the left is commonly anticipated amongst female friends. Many men using a twohanded shake where placing the left hand on the right forearm is Communication is formal and the Spaniards follow the rules of protocol. Conducting business with people they know and trust are what the Spanish prefer. In-person meetings are preferred over any other communication. Reconfirming meetings are communicated in writing or by telephone the prior week. It is important to watch for non-verbal The limit in working with people has decreased dramatically making it convenient to work with the most knowledgeable people worldwide. English has fast become the language people use when reaching their widest possible audience. It is important to realize a basic understanding of cultural diversity as the key to effective cross-cultural communications. People must learn how to efficiently communicate with individuals and groups. Cross-cultural communicating must
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  • 5. 5 References Kwintessential. (2011). Canada-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/canada.html Kwintessential. (2011). Spain-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/canada.html Kwintessential. (2011). India-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Centre for Intercultural Learning. Retrieved from http://www.intercultures.ca/cil-cai/ci-ic-eng.asp? iso=in#cn-2
  • 6. 5 References Kwintessential. (2011). Canada-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/canada.html Kwintessential. (2011). Spain-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/canada.html Kwintessential. (2011). India-Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette. Centre for Intercultural Learning. Retrieved from http://www.intercultures.ca/cil-cai/ci-ic-eng.asp? iso=in#cn-2