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Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros
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Bio101 lt a_week5 Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros

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Edward F. T. Charfauros, inspiring author, assists fellow students with their presentation for a successful grade. He also blogs upon his own inspiring blog, where you'll discover life changing stuff. …

Edward F. T. Charfauros, inspiring author, assists fellow students with their presentation for a successful grade. He also blogs upon his own inspiring blog, where you'll discover life changing stuff. Sign up for his blog by sending him an email~

Copyright 2013 Edward F. T. Charfauros. Reference, www.YourBlogorResume.net.

Published in: Education, Travel, Technology
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  • 1. South Florida Everglades Ecosystem A Team A Presentation: Rayleen Reyes, Ann Stevens, Penina Vakalahi, & Edward Charfauros
  • 2. •About The South Florida Everglades •Organisms in The Everglades Ecosystem •Structure and Function of Main Organs •Label of Major Organisms •Types of Consumers •Everglades Food Chains, Biome •Everglades Ecosystem •Hazards By Humans •Summary Agenda EdwardEdward RayleenRayleen PeninaPenina AnnAnn References and Questions?
  • 3. Introduction •Early settling (original 3,000,000 acre historic Everglades) •Everglades Agricultural Area (E.A.A. - the northern 1,000,000 acres) •Everglades National Park (the southern 1,500,000 acres) •Water Conservation Area (large Florida city flood control-500,000 acres) About The South Florida Everglades
  • 4. • Plants • Birds • Reptiles • Mammals • Invading Species Organisms in The Everglades Ecosystem
  • 5. Two organisms of choice •Plants •Birds Structure and Function of Main Organs
  • 6. • Snapping Turtle • Lake Trout • Alewife • Bullfrog • Waterflea • Class Monogonanta Label of Major Organisms
  • 7. The Everglades is comprised of more than 100 marsh species that live in water all or much of the year. Its most well-known wetland plant is sawgrass, a normally hearty grass-like species that has formed thousands of acres of marshes. Label of Major Organisms CITATION: Godfrey, M. (2013)
  • 8. • Cypress is probably the most recognized tree in the Everglades, and includes the dwarf and bald species. • Cypress require water to develop, and then can live on either dry land or in water as mature trees. They have unusual root systems producing “knees” that grow out of the earth which scientists think are used for breathing. Cypress trees shed their leaves in the fall – somewhat unusual in a subtropical environment. Another interesting tree found in the islands is the pond apple, which produces large, bitter, yellow-green fruit. Pond apples are a food source for some animals. Label of Major Organisms CITATION: Godfrey, M. (2013)
  • 9. • Herbivores • Carnivores • Omnivores Types of Consumers
  • 10. Everglades Food Chains
  • 11. Biome • Food • Hair • Atmosphere cycle H20, N2, 02, and etc.
  • 12. Everglades Food Chains
  • 13. Population Growth • Plants •Birds •Reptiles •Mammals Everglades Ecosystem IMAGE CITATION: Summit Voice, 2011
  • 14. Regulation Through Community Interaction •The Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District •Community Outreach in Action (COIA) •Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) CITATION: U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. , & South Florida Water Management District (2013) •Marjory Stoneman Douglas Everglades Protection Act (EPA) •The Federal Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) (of 1992, of 1996, of 2000, and of 2007) •Everglades Forever Act •Senate Bill 54A •Senate Bill 392 •Everglades Restoration Investment Act • Save Our Everglades Trust Fund •The Federal Omnibus Appropriations Act CITATION: State of Florida (2011) Everglades Ecosystem
  • 15. • Recreational fishing • Diving • Boat anchoring • Fires • Digging canals/Building dams • Nutrient pollution Hazards By Humans
  • 16. Summary • Settling begun in the 1900s with 3,000,000 acres • Many habitats of species are declining, endangered, or extinct. • Anacondas and Alligators dominate food chains • The restoration of the Everglades is an ongoing effort to remedy damage. • Major threats are invading species and humans (directly and indirectly). • After destructive practices, state and federal agencies continue toward balancing natural environment needs.
  • 17. • Godfrey, M. (2013). The journey to restore america's everglades. Retrieved from http://www.evergladesplan.org/index.aspx • Glencoe McGraw-Hill. (2007). Everglades food web . Retrieved from www.scientific-art.com/portfolio natural history pages/evergweb.htm • United State Geological Survey Website, 2013. Mercury studies in the Florida Everglades. Retrieved on March 30, 2013 from: http://sofia.usgs.gov/publications/fs/166-96/foodchain.html • BC Teachers Resource Centre - Mountain View Conservation, March 2013. Rewilding the world: dispatches from the conservation revolution. Retrieved on March 30, 2013 from: www.mtnviewconservation.org • ChainWebAct website, 2013. Mangrove food chain zoos and parks. Retrieved on March 30, 2013 from sciencedirect.com • Exploring Nature Educational Resource, 2013. A natural science resource for students and educators: Retrieved on March 30, 2013 from: http://www.exploringnature.org/db/detail.php?dbID=2&detID=2287 • U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. , & South Florida Water Management District (2013). The journey to restore america. Retrieved from http://www.evergladesplan.org • Summit Voice. (2011). Prehistoric trash piles helped build everglade habitat. Retrieved from http://summitcountyvoice.com/2011/03/26/prehistoric-trash-piles-diversified-everglades-habitat/ • State of Florida. (2011). State and federal legislation. Retrieved from http://www.dep.state.fl.us/evergladesforever/restoration/legislation.htm References
  • 18. Questions? Thank you!

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