• Save
Security in Wireless(1) Sensor(2) Networks(3) - Two out of three ain't bad?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Security in Wireless(1) Sensor(2) Networks(3) - Two out of three ain't bad?

  • 453 views
Uploaded on

Slides from the ECU Security Research Institute seminar Monday March 2013, presented by Dr Mike Johnstone. ...

Slides from the ECU Security Research Institute seminar Monday March 2013, presented by Dr Mike Johnstone.

Given the explosion that is the “Internet of Things”, wireless sensors are set to outstrip devices such as computers and smart phones on the Internet.

These sensors are used for home automation, smart grids, military deployment etc. However, in contrast to their wired equivalents, wireless networks usually have dynamic topologies, are unprotected from other signals sharing the same medium, and are significantly less reliable than wired networks.

This raises issues for such networks in terms of reliability and security- a thorny topic for critical infrastructure. This seminar will explore the scope of wireless sensor networks and evaluate some significant security issues in this space.

Speaker Profile
Dr Mike Johnstone is a member of the Security Research Institute at Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Western Australia where he teaches secure programming. His research interests include secure development methodologies (for mobile applications), wireless sensor networks (for military systems) and cloud security (for e-Health data sharing). He has been a contractor for private industry, government and research organisations and has held various roles including programmer, systems analyst, project manager and network manager before moving to academia.

The ECU Security Research Institute (ECUSRI) is a research unit with Edith Cowan University.

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
453
On Slideshare
453
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Security in Wireless Sensor Networks Security in Wireless(1) Sensor(2) Networks(3) - Two Out of Three Aint Bad? Mike Johnstone m.johnstone@ecu.edu.au Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 1
  • 2. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Agenda • The Scope of Wireless Sensor Networks • What are Wireless Sensors? • An example WSN technology • Case Studies • Security issues with WSN devices Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 2
  • 3. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute The Internet of things… (Cisco, 2011) Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 3
  • 4. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute The Internet of things… (Cisco, 2011) Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 4
  • 5. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Wireless Sensor Networks • Cheap and robust • A multitude of uses, including: – Home automation, tagging goods, weather reporting – Home monitoring of individuals in aged care environments – Automated meter reading for public/private utilities Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 5
  • 6. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute What exactly is a Wireless Sensor? • Each node has: – A microprocessor – Some memory – One or more sensors (audio, video…) – Some way to communicate wirelessly with other nodes Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 6
  • 7. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Wireless Sensor Node (CC2431 on Battery Board) Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 7
  • 8. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Wireless Sensor Node (Waspmote) Weight: 20g Power consumption: 15mA on, 55 A sleep Built-in: temp sensor and accelerometer Wireless protocols supported: 8 Sensors available: 60 Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 8
  • 9. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Manufactured by… • Atmel • Libelium • Samsung • Texas Instruments • … Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 9
  • 10. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute A Spectrum of Capabilities Wireless Standards 802.11b Complexity BlueTooth ZigBee Data Rate Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 10
  • 11. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Mesh Networks Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 11
  • 12. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Low Power WSN Standards • ZigBee • Z-Wave • WirelessHART • 6LoWPAN • … Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 12
  • 13. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute 6LoWPAN • Problem: WSN protocols and the Internet are incompatible • Solution: 6LoWPAN • Lets any device be accessible from the Internet Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 13
  • 14. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Leading to… Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 14
  • 15. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute ZigBee-An example WSN standard • Developed by the ZigBee Alliance • Main characteristics – low data rates – low power consumption – security – reliability Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 15
  • 16. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute ZigBee • Specific characteristics – Operates on the 2.4 GHz ISM (industrial, scientific and medical) band – 16 channels available – Range 10-75m – Uses strong encryption Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 16
  • 17. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute ZigBee-aware devices can be used for… • Home Automation – Air conditioning – Irrigation Systems – Lighting Control Systems – Meter Reading Systems – Security Systems – Universal Remote Control Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 17
  • 18. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute To connect devices like this to a HAN Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 18
  • 19. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Example: Smart Grid Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 19
  • 20. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Further uses of ZigBee • Industrial Automation – Asset Management – Livestock Tracking – Personnel Tracking • Other Applications – Fire Extinguishers – Gas (air quality, forest fire) Sensors – Room Access Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 20
  • 21. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute WSNs-Security issues • Confidentiality – Key distribution – Key transmission • Integrity – False nodes joining the network • Availability – Susceptibility to denial-of-service attacks Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 21
  • 22. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Case Studies: Valuable uses of WSNs • Vehicle tracking – Your car knows when the speed limit changes • Heath care – If someone is in trouble, an alert can be raised • Environmental monitoring – Track progress of chemical spills • Battlefield intelligence Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 22
  • 23. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute WSNs-Current research at ECU-SRI • Mitigation of denial of service attacks • Advances in key distribution • Using multi-agent systems to improve decision-making Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 23
  • 24. Edith Cowan UniversitySecurity Research Institute Questions? Copyright 2013 - Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University 24