How will your garden grow? 60 things to try in your garden or allotment
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How will your garden grow? 60 things to try in your garden or allotment

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This is a book of ideas of things to grow and make, things that other people will love when harvest time comes, and things that are more interesting, fun to grow, and nicer than the stuff you can find ...

This is a book of ideas of things to grow and make, things that other people will love when harvest time comes, and things that are more interesting, fun to grow, and nicer than the stuff you can find in a supermarket.

It includes simple things like making herb teas, growing edible flowers, and making natural vegetable dyes.
This book came out of support from the Big Lottery Fund for a project called Seeds, Soup and Sarnies that gave the Eden Project a chance to work with local families and communities to explore the benefits of growing and sharing food together.

Growing our own not only gives us good things to enjoy, it encourages us to stay active. Gardening and cooking things together is also a great way to get to know people and make friends.

It is even possible to grow things for sale and make really helpful bits of money to contribute to group activities, buying tools and generally keeping things going.

Our experience of growing is not always perfect though - often you either have a disaster with some crops and bring home nothing but some slug-chewed remnants, or things seem to go too well and you get buried under a glut that you can’t possibly get through.

Swapping, sharing and selling are all brilliant ways of dealing with shortages and gluts, but it works even better if there is a bit of planning ahead. That way everyone isn’t faced with trying to get rid of jars of green tomato chutney at the same time!

Enjoy.

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How will your garden grow? 60 things to try in your garden or allotment Document Transcript

  • 1. Eden Project/Chris Saville/apexnewspix.com
  • 2. This book came out of support from the Big Lottery Fund for a project called Seeds, Soup and Sarnies that gave the Eden Project a chance to work with local families and communities to explore the benefits of growing and sharing food together. Growing our own not only gives us good things to enjoy, it encourages us to stay active. Gardening and cooking things together is also a great way to get to know people and make friends. It is even possible to grow things for sale and make really helpful bits of money to contribute to group activities, buying tools and generally keeping things going. Our experience of growing is not always perfect though - often you either have a disaster with some crops and bring home nothing but some slug-chewed remnants, or things seem to go too well and you get buried under a glut that you can’t possibly get through. Swapping, sharing and selling are all brilliant ways of dealing with shortages and gluts, but it works even better if there is a bit of planning ahead. That way everyone isn’t faced with trying to get rid of jars of green tomato chutney at the same time! This is a book of ideas of things to grow and make, things that other people will love when harvest time comes, and things that are more interesting, fun to grow, and nicer than the stuff you can find in a supermarket. Enjoy. Eden Project 1
  • 3. very veggie who needs to grow carrots and potatoes when you can grow stripy? Stuart Spurring missyredboots 2
  • 4. raymortim 1 Got a tomato glut?  Don’t just make a brown tomato chutney like everyone else. Try slow roasting tomato on a really gentle heat until they are semi- dried and then put in jars of oil. 2 Green tomato ketchup Not enough summer sun to ripen your tomatoes? Trying to think what to do with them? Thankfully there are lots of options on the internet, including green tomato salsa, chutney, cake and green tomato ketchup! 4 Grow a gourd, Sow a SQUASH... ...they’re so weird! Gourds and squashes come in all sorts of weird and wonderful shapes and sizes and they can be dried, even varnished, and turned into decorations that will last for years. 3 Microgreens If you’re looking for something that’s quick and easy to grow and that can happen in the smallest of spaces, then microgreens may just be the thing. There’s a big world of microgreens outside of cress. You won’t find them in the supermarket and they can be an unusual, healthy addition to the kids’ lunchbox. US Department of Agriculture raymortim Nurettin Taskaya Nick Saltmarsh Scott D. Welch 4 5
  • 5. Erin B 5 Any colour as long as it , s black One way of adding variety to your vegetable growing is to choose a more unusual colour. Black gives you black kale, black tomatoes, black carrots. black corn black kale black beans 6 Growing for the jar How about making fresh horseradish? Very easy to grow and as long as you know about its appetite to take over your garden you can plant accordingly – in a container or somewhere you don’t mind it spreading. Young plants won’t give much of a kick but after a few years you will have perfect stock to make a punchy relish. For a more unusual mix, combine with beetroot to make the Russian dish khren. 7 Vegetable marmalades and jams No need to let the fruits take the stage when it comes to jam making, there are lots of tasty options with veg. Sweet ones like carrots and squashes and soft flavoured ones like courgettes combine well with spices like cloves, ginger and nutmeg. And why not use up your surplus tomatoes (technically a fruit but used as a vegetable) in a tomato and chilli jam? micromoth Pamela J. Eisenberg peachyqueen Lila Dobbs 6 7
  • 6. Biswarup Ganguly Jimmie 9 Chutney You can make chutneys from just about anything so they are a great way of using up surplus vegetables. Try more varied and unusual combinations to make your chutney stand out from the crowd – beetroot and spice, pumpkin and ginger … 8 Veggie printing Solid vegetables like potatoes and carrots make great printing blocks and all you need is some dye and some cloth and away you go. Tea towels are a great start then why not branch out to bags, cards or even a full veggie picnic set with a large canvas picnic sheet and smaller napkins? 10 a touch of colour Make more money from what you sell by growing things that are eye-catching and can’t be found in the supermarket. Not everything that looks unusual is hard to grow. It can be as simple as different colours of radish or carrots for a fun rainbow effect, and you can find varieties of all sorts of veg in fancy colours and shapes. Stuart Spurring Masha storebukkebruse Max Straeten 8 9
  • 7. 12 Got a marrow glut? Turn your marrow glut into an opportunity for multi-making. The good news is the internet is full of ideas for recipes involving marrow – veggie stock, chocolate courgette cake, courgette and potato cakes, marrow fritters, chutney, ginger marrow jam, Lebanese stuffed marrow and marrow pickle. You can even carve them into weird and wonderful shapes! 11 Surprise sprouts All sorts of different seeds can be sprouted to make a great addition to a salad. Try red onion, purple cabbage or broccoli seed for eye- catching and colourful results that are also delicious. Buy organic seed or order from a specialist seed supplier (lots on the internet) so the seeds aren’t coated in any foul chemicals. 13 Buried treasure Tubers are great, they are generally easy to grow and keep well. But there’s more to tubers than potatoes (as lovely as they are). Looking for more unusual ideas? How about the Egyptian Walking Onion that gives you a combo of spring onions, shallots and onions all in one plant. Or if potatoes, choose more unusual varieties like pink fir apples and earlies which will have a higher value than your standard potato. 14 Veggie crisps From the more familiar potato crisps, to the more unusual like kale, beetroot and even courgette sliced lengthways. Very simple to make and plenty of options for making crisps you wouldn’t find in a supermarket by adding alternative combinations of spices and oils. pink fir apple egyptian walking onion Vladislav Sabanov Stuart Spurring Cyclonebill Amanda Slater Julie Gibbons H. Zell 10 11
  • 8. 15 Variations on a veg bag There is lots of scope for putting a different spin on the standard veg bag. Themed mini veg bags for example. Maybe a bag of fresh herbs and leaves that are high value and not always easy to get. Or a make-it bag with vegetables that can be used for a specific recipe or cuisine, an Italian selection perhaps? Or a curry bag? 16 Classy produce Sometimes you can add value to your produce by choosing veg that is expensive to buy, like asparagus, or by picking veg when it’s young. Courgettes are just young marrows and squashes picked when young and tender are a tasty alternative to the full grown ones. Or why not try something unusual, like a curly green courgette called Trombocino - the plant is a climber so it can be grown wherever there is a bit of wall space. trombocino Aurelien Guichard Maena Nanao Wagatsuma Nadiatalent Adam Wyles 12 13
  • 9. Garitzko Thegreenj 17 Dyeing for a change Food dyes are fun to experiment with and can be used for lots of things - creating striking icing, making pretty play dough, brewing up magic potions, colouring wool and fabric and decorating Easter eggs. What colours could you make from the veg plot? Peelings are a fantastic free way to experiment, try boiling up some beetroot or carrot skins. The trick is picking out the winners from the mass of plants that produce various underwhelming colours and there are plenty of links on the internet to get you going. If you’re feeling more adventurous you could try growing Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) to sell the processed dye or to make things from it. indigo beetroot celery carrot tops mizuna pea shoots 18 spectacular salads luscious leaves gorgeous greens There is more to salad than iceberg lettuce. There are masses of fantastic leaves that are good to eat and grow, from the Asian varieties such as mizuna and tatsoi, to the younger leaves of crop vegetables such as beetroot and pea shoots and even the bits we often throw away like carrot tops and celery leaves - pretty as a garnish at the very least! Stuart Spurring Popolon Jane Stoneham Jane Stoneham 14 15
  • 10. 19 get with the beet Grate them raw for pink coleslaw, pickle them, add the colourful baby leaves in a salad, great for a colourful curry, sweet enough for baking a rich dark chocolate cake. And then there’s the golden ones, the white ones, ones with rings and baby ones. Boiled, roasted, pickled, there’s no end to what you can do with them. 20 ...but maybe not five a day! Pumpkin pie, carrot cake, rhubarb tea bread, beetroot brownies, veggies can be part of pudding as well! You can experiment with root vegetables and squashes, they’re cheap and add moisture to your baking. rhubarb yoghurt cake mini pumpkin pies carrot cake Liz West Dichohecho Beet man Downtowngal Michel Chauvet Michel Chauvet Beck Garry Knight Danielle Scott Laura Rezepte-wiki 16 17
  • 11. Flowery flowers make the world a better place. bees and butterflies love them. Some of them are lookers, others are all about the smell, some of them even taste good. Yukiroad Chamomile rollingroscoe 18 19
  • 12. 21 Everlasting flowers Flowers for drying such as statice are incredibly easy to grow, but amazingly long lasting and useful in all sorts of ways - bunches and also as part of decorations and even jewellery. Extreme dried flower arranging! The Christmas dried flower garland at Cotehele in Cornwall. Blimey! painting witH petalS 22 Pressed flowers This opens up a whole world of creative gorgeousness and it’s not limited to flowers, you can get great effects from using leaves and buds too. 24 SUCH PRETTY PAPER! In Ambalavao, Madagascar, they press fresh flowers into handmade paper which they dry in the sun 23 perfumy POT POURRI Dried petals and flowers, seeds, nuts, even pieces of bark - add a few drops of an aromatic oil. Couldn’t be simpler and a great chance for the kids to try some different ideas. Manfred Heyde Deng Yingyu Nick, puritani35 Julie David Jean-Louis Vandevivère Leonora Enking Leonora Enking 20 21
  • 13. 26 Festive flowers Got a wedding coming up? Have you thought about how much the flowers are going to cost? How about growing some (or all!) to save money and add a nice natural touch to the whole event. Using home-grown and wild flowers to decorate wedding tables, buttonholes and bridal bouquets is becoming increasingly popular. 25 Make a cutting garden Why not go a step further and set up a cutting garden that can supply flowers and foliage for all sorts of events and functions, or even just sell them to your local neighbourhood. Flowers can sometimes be easier to grow and more reliable than vegetables and worth more. Not everything cuts and lasts well but look on the internet or in a florist for ideas, or just experiment. 27 Flower confetti Confetti made from flower petals is a lovely alternative to the traditional paper and is free of the clear-up problems as it will quickly degrade afterwards. You can use flowers like roses, delphiniums and hydrangea to give you combinations of pinks and blues. Marigolds and sunflowers are good for bright orange and will lend themselves to festivals like Diwali. dehydrate your own flowers micromoth Jane Stoneham Tracey & Doug 22 23
  • 14. OX-EYE FRITTER? And let's not forget lovely lavender... 30 Edible flowers Make your salads the envy of your neighbours by adding some flowers. There’s a good range that are safe to munch (always check which ones are) and they add some lovely flavour too. Nasturtiums are an easy choice, simple to grow and free flowering. Make crystallised flowers for cakes, add flowers to bottles of vinaigrettes, and small flowers in ice are great for adding summer sparkle to drinks. Place a large flower like hibiscus in a glass and use as a dish for dip. For the more adventurous, the day lily (Hemerocallis) is a nice edible choice, good flavour and a garden perennial so it will come up every year. Others include rose petals (remove the bitter white bit), rose hips, pansy, sunflowers. If you search for ‘edible flowers’ on the internet you will find plenty of ideas. PANSy SALAD? flower cupcakes 28 what a lovely bunch... Bunches of flowers can be a lovely gift, a nice addition to a local produce stall or the whole focus for selling. It’s a good plan to choose ones that are more unusual or pick your own bunch of flowers and foliage for flower arrangements, bouquets for weddings, local cafés etc. 29...of greens Its not just flowers that are good for cutting. Foliage is important too. If you have a piece of unused land it can be a great idea to fill it with shrubs that are good for cutting. Holly is special but slow growing and there are other plants like Eleagnus and Euronymus that grow faster and work well. Drilnoth Jack Berry Dendroica Cerulea Kakisky Chamomile 24 25
  • 15. Jebulon 26 27
  • 16. Fruity sweet and juicy, firm and tart, berries and cherries, apples and pears. a summer pudding, a winter crumble, pies, jams, jellies and sweets. give me my five a day! Bert Kaufmann Alexandre Dulaunoy 28
  • 17. 31 Berrytastic mixes Get the best of berry fruits by choosing some that are a combination of two or more, like a loganberry (raspberry and blackberry cross), jostaberry (gooseberry and blackcurrant cross) and tummelberry. Or ones that tend to be expensive to buy like blueberry, cranberry and goji berry. BLUEBERRIES SUPER TASTY SUPERFOODS! JOSTABERRIES GOJI berries CRANberries 32 Japanese wineberry Worth a mention in its own right, Japanese wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius) is related to the raspberry and even easier to grow. Grow it like you would a raspberry. It produces vigorous canes and fruits in the gap between summer and autumn raspberries. It produces bright, glistening fruit that can be eaten fresh or used for preserving and cooking. It grows well in shade too, what’s not to like? Alexander Van Loon Daveeza Keith Weller I, Zualio Dladek Jamain 30 31
  • 18. 34Fruit curtain Dried orange slices stitched together with lines of invisible nylon thread make a great fruity curtain or window decoration. 33 Sorbet Sorbet is basically fruit juice, sugar and water mixed together and frozen. It couldn’t be much easier to make – puree your fresh fruit with a blender or by hand, freeze it a bit, beat it a bit, freeze it a bit, beat it a bit, freeze it. 35 strange fruit These are the fruits you won’t see in the shops. Supermarkets steer clear of fruits that bruise easily and that means we miss out on some of the most amazingly tasty fruits like mulberries and medlars. With some of these you won’t get instant results but once established they need very little attention and deliver a regular bounty that can be used for jams, cordials and more.  white raspberries marvellous MEDLArs... ... and mulberries Benjamin Esham Beck Quinn Dombrowski Eric Schmuttenmaer Andrew Dunn 32 33
  • 19. 36 Cordial AND MORE Sugary syrup infused with flowers and fruits. Drizzle it over warm cakes, freeze it in ice cube trays for fragrant cooling spritzers , stick a stick in it and make your own lollies. Oh, and it’s basically sorbet waiting to happen. Oranges, lemons and limes for sure, elderflower for free, 36a Mix it up. Oranges, lemons and limes. Blackcurrants, and elderflowers, absolutely. Rhubarb? Raspberries? Gooseberries? Beetroot and Ginger? Sweet and sharp seems to be the key. 36b Cordial ice cubes for a spritzer with a slow flavour release. 36c Home-made lollipops. 36d Drizzled over warm cakes, breads and muffins. 36e Just add cold water…or take it hot. 36f Pour over ice cream – everyone has their favourite flavour! how about white raspberry cordial? 38 Tisanes Tisanes have been used around the world for nearly as long as written history extends. Documents have been recovered dating back as early as Ancient Egypt and Ancient China that discuss the enjoyment and uses of tisanes.  Tisanes can be made with fresh or dried flowers, leaves, seeds or roots, generally by pouring boiling water over the plant parts and letting them steep for a few minutes. Some popular versions: mint, lemon balm, nettle, citrus peel - great for using up the leftovers after making lemon or orange cake. 37 Fruit leather You can make fruit leather from all sorts of fruits and it’s a great way of turning your surplus crop into a something delicious that will keep well and that you can make into gifts or produce to sell. Think about more unusual fruits like fuchsia. Matthieu Deuté Selena N.B.H. rajkumar1220 Julie kahvikisu Liz 34 35
  • 20. 39 jelly for your belly Of course you can always make jam, but what about a jelly infused with herbs and spices with seeds, leaves and stems trapped like prehistoric flies in amber? Stunning and stunningly good! EVERYONE LOVES jelly! Dennis Jarvis 36 37
  • 21. 40 a CLASSY TOUCH Make your event stand out from the crowd by using a classier fruit like white strawberries. 41 Fruit tattoos Add a tattoo to your fruit as a sure way to make it stand out from the crowd. This is surprisingly simple to do and although it’s cheap in terms of materials, it does require a considerable amount of time. And timing is crucial. It works by blocking out the sunlight as the fruit skin develops its colour so you need to get the stencils on early enough. Ideally use a stencil that stretches as the fruit grows so you can put them on when the fruit are still quite small. 42 Fruit ON A STICK Make your ice lollies, sorbets and ice creams very fancy by adding fresh fruit slices and juices. 44 i want to grow the best pear in the world The Merton Pride pear won’t give you the biggest crop but it will deliver the juiciest, more gorgeous fruit, simply the best you will find, well at least in our humble opinion. Of course there are others, the point is to choose something different to the ones you will find in the supermarket. Check which ones need other varieties to pollinate. If you only have room for one tree you need to choose a self-pollinator. 43 Crabapple Crabapples are easy to grow, beautiful and useful too. They can be planted as pollinators to help other apples give a good harvest but the crabapple fruit also makes fabulous jellies and cordials. Jane Stoneham Eliza Adam Andrew Fogg crabchick 38 39
  • 22. WATER sugaR CORDIAL drizzle tisane tea LOTS LOTSnone jellY sweets SYRUp Lollipops sorbet decorations jam marmalade compote candies snack mix leather Davburns 1970 GaborfromHungary Davburns1970 Eliza Adam Liz Selena N.B.H. Matthieu Deuté Benjamin Esham 40 41
  • 23. taSty Spicy + herby the language of taste and flavour, masters and mistresses of spices, mysteries and secret ingredients for curries, chutneys, kasundi, pickles, Ken Cook Thamizhpparithi Maari Jane Stoneham thebittenword 42
  • 24. 45 Herb salt Salt, herbs and a fancy pot. Perfect on your lovely new potatoes. The powerfully punchy herbs are good for this: sage, rosemary, fennel, thyme, or heat things up with a touch of chili or pepper. 46 Posh pastes Pesto is for more than just pasta - herb butters and savoury spreads, a swipe of flavour on sandwiches, a dollop on baked potatoes. Pesto can be made from more things than basil - wild rocket, wild garlic or parsley all work really well. 47 Basil Expensive to buy, great for making pesto. If you don’t want to wait for seeds, try repotting a few supermarket basil plants in good potting compost, and keep them somewhere warm with plenty of sun. Feed regularly, pinch off flowers as soon as they appear and the plants should last for months. Gloria Cabada-Lem Goldlocki Paul Goyette 44 45
  • 25. 52 not just a tea ball No need to fish around in your curry for the stray cardamom. Tea infusers will help keep your spices under control. 48 A whole bunch of flavour Bouquet garni – a herby classic from French Cuisine used in stews, soups and sauces. Thyme, bay, parsley are traditional, but try rosemary, tarragon, peppercorns, celery leaves, onion ... Tie up with string or pop them in a muslin bag. You can even use a coffee filter. 51 TISANES AGAIN... A book in itself! Tisanes are a wonderful way to make the most of your fresh or dried leaves, seeds and flowers. Mint, peppermint, lemon balm, lemon verbena, ginger, fennel, sage - the list is endless. Just make sure you identify the plant correctly and check for possible toxicity. The best plan is to go out with an experienced forager, at least to start with. 49 Sweet or Savoury Bay, fennel, mint, basil...try them with fruit, not just with meat. 50Infused sugars Lavender, mint, fennel. Your pancakes will never taste ordinary. bronze fennel citymama Jane Stoneham Hustvedt 663Highland Tomi Knuutila 46 47
  • 26. 53 Help! My coriander has bolted! Save the seeds for more coriander next year, for pickling, infusing or for toasting and grinding. Ever tried a pinch of ground coriander with coffee? Interesting new flavour! LET a bed go to seed... celery fennel caraway Aniseed sunflower poppy mustard carrot Lovely! Lots of fresh coriander leaves for your curries, salads and salsas... ...or plant and sprout again... ...the flowers are pretty... ...fennel will go to seed too... ...but the seeds are the real prize, packed with powerful, citrusy flavour... ...there are loads of exotic spice mixes, you could grow your own... ...or take it a step further. This sugar coated spice mix (mostly fennel seed) freshens your breath like an Indian after dinner mint! H. Zell H. Zell H. Zell Takeaway TakeawayTheornamentalist Martyvis Thamizhpparithi Maari 48 49
  • 27. Dichohecho 55 flavour, cubed Keep your surplus fresh herbs for use all year round by freezing them. Make sure the herbs are clean, chop them, add to an ice cube tray, fill with water and freeze. That’s all there is to it. 54 SOS - Save our sweaters! Those dastardly clothes moths don’t like fragrant herbs! Dried herbs work too, but put them in something porous, like a muslin bag, or it can get a bit messy. Or you can soak cotton wool balls in essential oils such as lavender, rosemary or clove. When the balls are dry scatter them round wardrobes and drawers. 58 Chew mint, not gum As a healthier option, just pick some (clean!) fresh mint and chew away. 57 Peppermint and beyond Mint is one of the easiest things to grow and comes in a huge range of flavours. Peppermint and spearmint are the obvious ones, but now you will find flavours like strawberry, chocolate, pineapple, lemon, apple and even banana. They are invasive so people often grow them in containers. Use them to flavour drinks and foods, freeze in ice cubes. 56 space savers Want to keep your fresh herb supply going beyond the summer? There are some you can grow easily on a sunny windowsill. Chives, parsley, chervil, mint, basil... chive flower Aiwok Diana House Jane Stoneham Pharaoh Hound Pauline Moir 50 51
  • 28. Line1 Joy 59 tea with a twist Add something a little specialto an everyday drink. Hot milkwith honey and bay, chai teas with coriander, green tea with fresh mint. Miansari66 Arne Hückelheim David R. Tribble 60 Thugs Sage, rosemary, fennel, mint. You just can’t kill them (unless you forget to water them) and they certainly pack a powerful punch. Use them to infuse salt for roasting and play with them in dried bouquets. An infusion of sage leaves can help with mouth ulcers. saGE AND APRICOT BISCUITS 52 53
  • 29. H. Zell54 55
  • 30. Authors: Stuart Spurring, Jane Stoneham, Tony Kendle Editor: Mike Petty Designed by Stuart Spurring First published 2014 by the Eden Project Text and design © 2014 by the Eden Project ISBN 978-0-9562213-2-2 Many fine photographers, whether professionals, Eden colleagues or Eden friends, have contributed tothis edition. Copyright is reserved to the photographers and/or the Eden Project, to whom requests forreproduction should be directed in the first instance. Front cover: penywise (morgueFile) Wikimedia Commons: 663Highland, Aiwok, Andrew Dunn, Arne Hückelheim, Beet man, BiswarupGanguly, Cyclonebill, Danielle Scott, Davburns 1970, Daveeza, David R. Tribble, Deng Yingyu, Dichohecho,Dladek, Downtowngal, Drilnoth, Eric Schmuttenmaer, Garitzko, Goldlocki, H. Zell, Hustvedt, I, Zualio,Jamain, Jean-Louis Vandevivère, Jebulon, Joy, Keith Weller, Laura, Line1, Liz West, Manfred Heyde,Martyvis, Matthieu Deuté, Miansari66, Michel Chauvet, Nadiatalent, Nanao Wagatsuma, Nurettin Taskaya,Paul Goyette, Pharaoh Hound, Popolon, Quinn Dombrowski, Rezepte-wiki, Scott D. Welch, Selena N.B.H.,Takeaway, Thamizhpparithi Maari, thebittenword, Thegreenj, Theornamentalist, Tomi KnuutilaFlickr: Adam Wyles, Alexander Van Loon, Alexandre Dulaunoy, Amanda Slater, Andrew Fogg, AurelienGuichard, Beck, Benjamin Esham, Bert Kaufmann, citymama, crabchick, Dendroica Cerulea, DennisJarvis, Diana House , Eliza Adam, Erin B, Garry Knight, Gloria Cabada-Lem, Jack Berry, Jimmie, Julie,Julie David, Julie Gibbons, kahvikisu, Ken Cook, Leonora Enking, Lila Dobbs, Liz , Masha, Nick Saltmarsh,Nick, puritani35, Pamela J. Eisenberg, rajkumar1220, storebukkebruse, Tracey & Doug, US Department ofAgriculture, Vladislav Sabanov, Yukiroad morgueFile: Chamomile, GaborfromHungary , Kakisky, Maena, Max Straeten, missyredboots,peachyqueen, raymortim, rollingroscoe allfreedownload: Pauline Moir rgbstock: micromoth Produced in partnership by the Eden Project and the Sensory Trust. The Eden Project is owned by the Eden Trust, registered charity no. 1093070 and allmonies raised go to further the charitable objectives. Eden Project, Bodelva, St Austell, Cornwall PL24 2SG T: +44 (0)1726 811911 F: +44 (0)1726 811912 edenproject.com Sensory Trust, Watering Lane Nursery, St Austell, Cornwall PL26 6BET: +44 (0)1726 222900 sensorytrust.org.uk
  • 31. www.edenproject.com