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Best practices in health literacy

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  • 1. HealthLiteracyWorking Group
    Best Practices:
    Approaches to Assessment
    Peggy Sissel-Phelan, Ed.D.
    December 1, 2010
  • 2. Health Literacy Defined
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
  • 3. Health Literacy Operationalized
    ROLES
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contextsto find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
  • 4. Health Literacy Operationalized
    METHODS
    ROLES
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
  • 5. Health Literacy Operationalized
    ROLES
    METHODS
    OUTCOMES
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order to live healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
    Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that improve the ability of people to act on information in order tolive healthier lives. These skills include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.
    (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
  • 6. Patients ~
    Bring varied “ability to act on information to
    improve health” due to
    Level of understanding
    OFhealth contexts
    • Clinical/Self help
    • 7. Access/Navigation
    • 8. Prevention/Treatment
    • 9. Chronic/Acute
    • 10. Emergency/Routine
    Level of skills IN
    health contexts
  • Providers ~
    Vary in “ability to help patientsfind, understand,
    evaluate, communicate, and useinformation” due to
    Varied understanding
    of their patients’ health
    contexts
    • Clinical/Self help
    • 15. Access/Navigation
    • 16. Prevention/Treatment
    • 17. Chronic/Acute
    • 18. Emergency/Routine
    Varied level of skills
    that help enable their
    patients in
  • Providers ~
    Vary in “ability to help patientsfind, understand,
    evaluate, communicate, and useinformation” due to
    Varied understanding
    of their patients’ health
    contexts
    • Clinical/Self help
    • 23. Access/Navigation
    • 24. Prevention/Treatment
    • 25. Chronic/Acute
    • 26. Emergency/Routine
    Varied level of skills
    that help enable their
    patients in
  • The Core of Best Practice
    Cultural
    Competency
  • 31. Components of Best Practices
    Methods
    Cultural
    Competency
    Roles Outcomes
  • 32. Components of Best Practice
    Methods
    Cultural
    Competency
    Roles Outcomes
    Tools
    Training
    Systems
  • 33. Components of Best Practice
    Tools
    Cultural
    Competency
    TrainingSystems
    Materials Means
    Supports &
    Services
    Clinical Interaction
    Policies
    Processes
  • 34. Components of Best Practice
    Tools
    Plain Language
  • 35. Plain Language
    and Health
    Addresses varied health contexts
    in accessible ways
    so patients are better able to
    Locate Decode Question Understand
    Health Information
  • 36. Plain Language and Health
    Passive sentences
    Long paragraphs
    Poly-syllable words
    Clinical language
    Past/mixed tense
    3rd person (they, s/he)
    Active sentences
    Short paragraphs
    Mono or bi-syllable
    Colloquial language
    Present tense
    2nd or 1st person (you, I)
  • 37. Plain Language: It’s the Law
    Plain Writing Act of 2010(Public Law No: 111-274)
    • Federal agencies must use “plain writing”
    • 38. All “covered documents” issued to public
    • 39. ~ Letters, publications, forms, notices, instructions
    • 40. ~ Anything relevant to federal benefits or requirements
    • 41. Signed Oct. 13, 2010; begins in 1 year
  • Plain Language
    http://www. plainlanguage.gov
  • 42. Plain Language
    http://www.nih.gov/clearcommunication/plainlanguage.htm