Wcse slides bates_galloway_denny

1,813 views
1,842 views

Published on

Slides for the virtual workshop delivered as part of the Western Conference on Science Education 2013.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,813
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
760
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Wcse slides bates_galloway_denny

  1. 1. student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning   Paul  Denny   paul@cs.auckland.ac.nz   The  University  of  Auckland   The  Western  Conference  on  Science  Educa>on   London,  Ontario,  Canada    |    July  9th  –  11th  2013   Simon  Bates   simon.bates@ubc.ca   The  University  of  Bri>sh  Columbia   Ross  Galloway   ross.galloway@ed.ac.uk   The  University  of  Edinburgh  
  2. 2. Overview  for  the  session   1)    About  PeerWise   2)    Hands-­‐on  session   3)    Research  highlights   4)    Q&A   student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning  
  3. 3. 1)    About  PeerWise   student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning  
  4. 4. a  web-­‐based  MCQ  repository  created  by  students  
  5. 5. InsItuIons    signing  up  per  year:     2009:      22   2010:      66   2011:      204   2012:      266   2013  (Jan-­‐Jun):    214   Growing  content  repository:     Courses:    2,500   Logins/month:    75,000   Ques>ons:    600,000   Answers:    12,000,000  
  6. 6. Student  ownership  over   learning  resource   Student  familiarity  with   social  soQware   Leveraging  student   energy  and  creaIvity  
  7. 7. Why  student  authored  ques>ons?   •  A  student  contribu>ng  a  new  ques>on  would   develop  the  ques>on  stem:   QuesIon   Student  authored  ques>on   HUBS192,  2010   University  of  Otago  
  8. 8. Why  student  authored  ques>ons?   AlternaIves   •  And  a  set  of   plausible   alterna>ves   •  Of  course,  the   correct  answer   must  be   indicated  
  9. 9. Why  student  authored  ques>ons?   AlternaIves   •  And  a  set  of   plausible   alterna>ves   •  Of  course,  the   correct  answer   must  be   indicated  
  10. 10. Why  student  authored  ques>ons?   ExplanaIon   •  And  an   explana>on,   in  their  own   words   •  Useful  for   students  who   answer   incorrectly  
  11. 11. “You  don't  really  understand  how  much  or  how  li5le   you  know  about  a  concept  un9l  you  try  to  devise  a   good,  original  ques9on  about  it”     “The  aspect  I  found  truly  useful  was  the  crea9on  of   ques9ons,  which  reinforced  much  of  [my]   understanding  while  also  ac9vely  making  me  clarify   and  solidify  my  thought  processes  (especially  the   explana9on  parts)”   Why  student  authored  ques>ons?   Student  feedback  
  12. 12. Badges   Points   Leaderboards  
  13. 13. 2)    Hands-­‐on  session   student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning   Your  turn:                open  a  new  window  in  your  browser  
  14. 14. Google:  peerwise   Start  typing:  Bri5sh  Columbia…...   hWp://peerwise.cs.auckland.ac.nz/at/?ubc_ca   Or  go  direct  to  the  URL:  
  15. 15. Registra>on  
  16. 16. Step  1  –  choose  a  name   Our  recommendaIon:     please  use  your  first  iniIal  and  your  surname  (e.g.  rgalloway)  
  17. 17. Step  2  –  enter  a  password  
  18. 18. Step  3  –  enter  the  Course  ID   7634  
  19. 19. Step  4  –  enter  your  Iden>fier   Any  3-­‐digit   number  between     100  and  500  
  20. 20. That’s  it!  
  21. 21. now  log  in…  
  22. 22. Choose  the  “WCSE  2013”  course  
  23. 23. 1)  Unanswered  ques>ons:  “view”   2)  Choose  ques>on   3)  Select  answer   Answering  quesIons  
  24. 24. 1)  Your  ques>ons:  “view”   2)  Create  new  ques>on   3)  Preview   4)  “Make  changes”  or  “Save  ques>on”   CreaIng  a  quesIon  
  25. 25. 3)    Research  highlights   student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning  
  26. 26. Research  highlights   •  Rela>onship  between  ac>vity  and   performance   •  The  quality  of  student-­‐authored  ques>ons   •  Influencing  student  behaviour  with  rewards  
  27. 27. Ac>vity  and  learning   •  Generally,  students:   – Par>cipate  beyond  minimum  requirements   – Engage  in  community  learning,  correc>ng  errors   – Create  problems,  not  exercises   – Provide  posi>ve  feedback  
  28. 28. Correla>on  with  end  of  course   outcomes  
  29. 29. Correla>on  with  end  of  course   outcomes  
  30. 30. Correla>on  with  end  of  course   outcomes  
  31. 31. Ques>on  quality   Comprehensive  categorisa>on  of  >50%  of   repository  for  two  successive  academic  years     Principal  measures  to  define  a  ‘high  quality   ques>on’    -­‐  cogni>ve  level  of  ques>on    -­‐  explana>on  quality    -­‐  other  binary  criteria  
  32. 32. Category Description 6 Create (synthesise ideas) 5 Assess 4 Analyse (multi-step) 3 Apply (1-step calcs.) 2 Understand 1 Remember Cogni>ve  level  of  ques>on  
  33. 33. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% 1 2 3 4 5 6 Taxonomic Category PercentageofSubmittedQuestions First semester N = 350 Second semester N = 252 Results: Question level Physics 1A / 1B 2011
  34. 34. •  Badge  /  achievement  system   •  Randomised  controlled  trial  (n  >  1000)   Authoring  ques>ons   Evalua>ng  ques>ons   Answering  ques>ons   Other   Do  rewards  work?  
  35. 35. No  difference  between  groups  with  respect  to  answer  correctness   +  13%   +  22%   DistribuIon  of  days  of  acIvity  differs  significantly  between  groups:  p  <  0.001   DistribuIon  of  answers  per  student  differs  significantly  between  groups:  p  <  0.001  
  36. 36. Implica>ons   •  Badges  can  have  a  measurable   posi>ve  impact  on  some  student   ac>ons   •  No  nega>ve  effects  on  ac>vity  or   percep>ons:  a  low-­‐risk   proposi>on  
  37. 37. Please  join  us!   hWp://www.peerwise-­‐community.org/   These  slides  hWp://bit.ly/WCSE_PW  
  38. 38. 4)    Q  &  A   student  generated  content  for   enhanced  engagement  and  learning  
  39. 39. Publica>ons   “Student-­‐generated  content:  using  PeerWise  to  enhance  engagement  and   outcomes  in  introductory  physics  courses”     (S.  P.  Bates,  R.  K.  Galloway,  K.  L.  McBride),  In  2011  Physics  Educa>on  Research   Conference  (NS  Rebello,  PV  Engelhardt,  C  Singh,  eds.),  Amer.  Inst.  Physics,  volume   1413,  2012.  (Physics  Educa>on  Research  Conference,  Omaha,  NE,  2011)       “Student-­‐generated  content:  Enhancing  learning  through  sharing  mulIple-­‐choice   quesIons”     (J.  A.  Hardy,  S.  P.  Bates,  M.  M.  Casey,  K.  W.  Galloway,    R.  K.  Galloway,  A.  E.  Kay,  P.   Kirsop,  &  H.  A.  McQueen),  submiqed  to  Interna>onal  Journal  of  Science  Educa>on       “Assessing  the  quality  of  a  student-­‐generated  quesIon  repository”   (S.  P.  Bates,  R.  K.  Galloway,  J.  Riise,  and  D.  Homer)  in  review  with  Physical  Review   Special  Topics:PER       “The  Effect  of  Virtual  Achievements  on  Student  Engagement”     (P.  Denny),  In  Proceedings  of  the  SIGCHI  Conference  on  Human  Factors  in   Compu>ng  Systems  (CHI  '13),  pp  763-­‐772.  ACM,  2013.  

×