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27th July 2011

27th July 2011

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Bates inverted classroom Bates inverted classroom Presentation Transcript

  • Inverting the classroom Why we need to and how you might go about it Simon BatesDean of Learning and Teaching Professor of Physics EducationCollege of Science and Engineering School of Physics & Astronomy s.p.bates@ed.ac.uk 1
  • Inverting the physics classroom Why we need to and how you might go about it Simon BatesDean of Learning and Teaching Professor of Physics EducationCollege of Science and Engineering School of Physics & Astronomy s.p.bates@ed.ac.uk 2
  • Disclaimer !Source : http://www.maximumpc.com/files/u46190/caution.jpg 3
  • Overview•  General premise•  Why we need to•  What we might do 4
  • Overview•  General premise•  Why we need to•  What we might do 5
  • Learning in phasesAcquisition - reading, listening, lectures etc.Assimilation - making meaning, connections, practice, discussion, integrating …. 6
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  • There are 2 problems:•  We spend much class contact time in activities towards the bottom•  We provide most access to expert help and guidance during class hours 9
  • Consequences:•  Lack of engagement, possible loss of confidence•  Strategic / shallow learning, geared totally towards passing exam 10
  • ‘Inverting the classroom’…Is about making more time for more cognitively demanding tasks in class hoursAnd / orAbout finding new ways to engage & support participants outside class hours. 11
  • ‘Inverting the classroom’…Is a long term strategic change process-  We’re at about 5 on a scale of 1-10.-  And coverage is patchy 12
  • Overview•  General premise•  Why we need to –  Maths, concepts, data-handling, self-study•  What we might do 13
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  • Conceptual understandingDespite high grades, often large deficits in conceptual understanding in e.g.Newtonian MechanicsElectricity and magnetismScientific thinking….. 19
  • Force Concept Inventory … a mature, established diagnostic test. 20
  • Labs: the implicit curriculum •  In practical work, we expect students to acquire data analysis skills in parallel to practical abilities. •  Frequently, these important skills are not explicitly taught and not effectively assessed. HEA Phys Sci Centre Development Project 2009-10 21
  • Typical question (from UBC pre-prototype) 23
  • A! 24
  • B! 25
  • C! 26
  • D! 27
  • A! B!C! D! 28
  • No statisticallysignificant differencebetween 1st, 2nd and4th year classes.James Day and Doug BonnPhys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 7, 010114 (2011) 29
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  • Overview•  General premise•  Why we need to•  What we might do –  Lectures, self-study 34
  • Lectures 35
  • “ The complex cognitive skills required to understand Physics cannot be developed by listening to lectures… … any more than one can learn to play tennis by watching tennis matches.” Hestenes, D. Am. J. Phys., 66, 465-7 (1998)
  • •  A “clicker”, a.k.a. –  An Electronic Voting System –  A Personal Response System –  An Audience Response System
  • Underpinned College Learningand Teaching strategy ‘Loanership’ of 3000 handsets Wide range of disciplines Science, Eng,Vet. Med.
  • “Although multiple choice questions may seemlimiting, they can be surprisingly good atgenerating the desired student engagement andguiding student thinking.They work particularly well if the possible answersembody common confusions or difficult ideas.”Wieman, C. and Perkins K., Physics Today (2005) 36-42.
  • •  What makes a good question? –  Concept-testing –  Where known misconceptions live –  Spread of answers expected
  • “Electronic classroom response systems....aremerely tools, not a magic bullet.To significantly impact student learning (they)must be employed with skill in the service of asound, coherent pedagogy.This is not easy.”Beatty, I.D., Gerace, W.J., Leonard, W.J., Dufresne, R.J., Am. J. Phys 2006
  • •  Peer Instruction –  Question –  Individual poll –  Students discuss –  Repoll
  • Reproduced from Eric Mazur(source “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube)
  • •  The reduction in coverage –  Departure from the A-Z content transmission –  The A-Z must be elsewhere (pre-reading, web, tutorial…) –  The students must buy-in to “the learning contract”
  • •  The first lecture is crucial –  Why we are doing this –  What we expect of them –  Practice use with friendly questions•  There is a learning curve –  This is not an “out of the box” solution –  Whole-team buy-in
  • •  What makes a good question ?•  How many to have each lecture ?•  Where to place it / them ?•  Beware shoe-horning content in
  • But does it work ? 53
  • Am. J. Phys. 66 1, January 1998 54
  • Reproduced from Eric Mazur(search “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube) 55
  • Reproduced from Eric Mazur(search “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube) 56
  • 1A 2008-09 Diag Test 45 40 35 30Frequency 25 Pre Post 20 15 10 5 0 Bin 57
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  • Self-study 59
  • The University of Edinburgh Edinburgh, Scotland 5th July, 2010 PeerWise bridging the gap between online learning and social mediaPaul DennyDepartment of Computer ScienceThe University of AucklandNew Zealand
  • •  Web-based MCQ repository built by students•  Students: –  develop new questions with associated explanations –  answer existing questions and rate them for quality and difficulty –  take part in discussions –  compete with other students to appear on leaderboards
  • Student familiarity with Web 2.0The energy and Student creativity of a generated large class questions
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  • •  To date –  77 institutions –  557 courses –  33757 students have contributed –  94207 questions have been written –  2308854 answers have been submitted
  • PeerWise was introduced in workshop sessions in Week 5Students worked throughstructured example taskand devised own Qsin groups. 72
  • An assessment was set for the end ofWeek 6:Minimum requirements:•  Write one question•  Answer 5•  Comment on & rate 3Contributed ~3% to course assessment 73
  • Uptake for in-course assessment Workshop Live Due training(class size of~200)350 questionsin total~3500 answers~2000 comments 74
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  • Quality of submissions:•  Average quality was very good•  Few trivial questions / nonsense distracters•  Highest quality questions were EXCEPTIONALLY good 78
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  • Student feedback 83
  • Positives 84
  • Does degree of PeerWise use correlate with end of course performance?Yes, for the majority of students 86
  • Summary•  Are we really making the best use of precious lecture / contact time?•  Are there more effective and efficient ways that we can engage and support students outside class time? 89
  • EdPER group website bit.ly/EdPERTalk slides on Slideshare EdPER_talkss.p.bates@ed.ac.uk 90