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Bates inverted classroom

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Talk given during visit to UKZN 16th-20th May 2011. …

Talk given during visit to UKZN 16th-20th May 2011.

Inverting the Classroom

Presented by: SImon Bates

Published in Education
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  • 1. Inverting the Physics Classroom Simon Bates Dean of Learning and Teaching Professor of Physics Education College of Science and Engineering School of Physics & Astronomy s.p.bates@ed.ac.uk 1Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 2. Overview • General premise • Why we need to • What we might do 2Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 3. Overview • General premise • Why we need to • What we might do 3Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 4. Learning in phases Acquisition - reading, listening, lectures etc. Assimilation - making meaning, connections, practice, discussion, integrating …. 4Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 5. 5Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 6. 6Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 7. There are 2 problems: • We spend much class contact time in activities towards the bottom • We provide most access to expert help and guidance during class hours 7Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 8. Consequences: • Lack of engagement • Strategic / shallow learning, geared totally towards passing exam • Helplessness, general 8Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 9. ‘Inverting the classroom’… Is about making more time for more cognitively demanding tasks in class hours And / or About finding new ways to engage participants outside class hours. 9Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 10. ‘Inverting the classroom’… Is a long term strategic change process - We’re at about 5 on a scale of 1-10. - And coverage is patchy 10Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 11. Overview • General premise • Why we need to – Maths, concepts, data-handling, self-study • What we might do 11Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 12. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 13. 13Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 14. MathsA-level paper 1988!Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 15. MathsA-level paper 2007Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 16. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 17. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 18. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 19. Conceptual understanding Despite high grades, often large deficits in conceptual understanding in e.g. Newtonian Mechanics Electricity and magnetism Scientific thinking ….. 17Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 20. Force Concept Inventory … a mature, established diagnostic test. 18Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 21. Force Concept Inventory … a mature, established diagnostic test. 18Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 22. Force Concept Inventory … a mature, established diagnostic test. 18Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 23. Force Concept Inventory … a mature, established diagnostic test. 18Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 24. Labs: the implicit curriculum • In practical work, we expect students to acquire data analysis skills in parallel to practical abilities. • Frequently, these generic skills are not explicitly taught and not effectively assessed. HEA Phys Sci Centre 19Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 25. HEA Student Employability Profiles HEA Phys Sci Centre 20Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 26. HEA Student Employability Profiles HEA Phys Sci Centre 20Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 27. Typical question (from UBC pre-prototype) HEA Phys Sci Centre 21Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 28. A HEA Phys Sci Centre 22Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 29. B HEA Phys Sci Centre 23Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 30. C HEA Phys Sci Centre 24Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 31. D HEA Phys Sci Centre 25Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 32. A B C D HEA Phys Sci Centre 26Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 33. HEA Phys Sci Centre 27Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 34. HEA Phys Sci Centre 27Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 35. HEA Phys Sci Centre 27Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 36. HEA Phys Sci Centre 27Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 37. No statistically significant difference between 1st, 2nd and 4th year classes. HEA Phys Sci Centre 27Sunday, 22 May 2011 Development Project 2009-10
  • 38. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 39. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 40. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 41. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 42. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 43. 16.0000 14.5000 Mean Test Score 13.0000 11.5000 10.0000 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Year of Study Edinburgh Physics year-by-year mean test scores 28Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 44. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 45. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 46. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 47. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 48. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 49. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 50. Overview • General premise • Why we need to • What we might do – Lectures, workshops, self-study 32Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 51. Lectures 33Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 52. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 53. “ The complex cognitive skills required to understand Physics cannot be developed by listening to lectures… … any more than one can learn to play tennis by watching tennis matches.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 54. “ The complex cognitive skills required to understand Physics cannot be developed by listening to lectures… … any more than one can learn to play tennis by watching tennis matches.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 55. “ The complex cognitive skills required to understand Physics cannot be developed by listening to lectures… … any more than one can learn to play tennis by watching tennis matches.” Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 56. “ The complex cognitive skills required to understand Physics cannot be developed by listening to lectures… … any more than one can learn to play tennis by watching tennis matches.” Hestenes, D. Am. J. Phys., 66, 465-7 (1998)Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 57. • A “clicker”, a.k.a. – An Electronic Voting System – A Personal Response System – An Audience Response SystemSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 58. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 59. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 60. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 61. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 62. Underpinned College Learning and Teaching strategy ‘Loanership’ of 2500 handsets Wide range of disciplines Science, Eng,Vet. Med.Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 63. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 64. “Although multiple choice questions may seem limiting, they can be surprisingly good at generating the desired student engagement and guiding student thinking. They work particularly well if the possible answers embody common confusions or difficult ideas.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 65. “Although multiple choice questions may seem limiting, they can be surprisingly good at generating the desired student engagement and guiding student thinking. They work particularly well if the possible answers embody common confusions or difficult ideas.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 66. “Although multiple choice questions may seem limiting, they can be surprisingly good at generating the desired student engagement and guiding student thinking. They work particularly well if the possible answers embody common confusions or difficult ideas.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 67. “Although multiple choice questions may seem limiting, they can be surprisingly good at generating the desired student engagement and guiding student thinking. They work particularly well if the possible answers embody common confusions or difficult ideas.” Wieman, C. and Perkins K., Physics Today (2005) 36-42.Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 68. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 69. • What makes a good question?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 70. • What makes a good question?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 71. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testingSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 72. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testingSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 73. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testing – Where known misconceptions liveSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 74. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testing – Where known misconceptions live – Spread of answers expectedSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 75. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testing – Where known misconceptions live – Spread of answers expectedSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 76. • What makes a good question? – Concept-testing – Where known misconceptions live – Spread of answers expectedSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 77. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 78. • What if you don’t know what misconceptions exist?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 79. • What if you don’t know what misconceptions exist?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 80. • What if you don’t know what misconceptions exist? – Get students to tell you; the “1 minute paper”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 81. • What if you don’t know what misconceptions exist? – Get students to tell you; the “1 minute paper” – Feedback loop from end-of-course assessmentSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 82. • What if you don’t know what misconceptions exist? – Get students to tell you; the “1 minute paper” – Feedback loop from end-of-course assessmentSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 83. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 84. “Electronic classroom response systems....are merely tools, not a magic bullet. To significantly impact student learning (they) must be employed with skill in the service of a sound, coherent pedagogy.Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 85. “Electronic classroom response systems....are merely tools, not a magic bullet. To significantly impact student learning (they) must be employed with skill in the service of a sound, coherent pedagogy. This is not easy.”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 86. “Electronic classroom response systems....are merely tools, not a magic bullet. To significantly impact student learning (they) must be employed with skill in the service of a sound, coherent pedagogy. This is not easy.” Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 87. “Electronic classroom response systems....are merely tools, not a magic bullet. To significantly impact student learning (they) must be employed with skill in the service of a sound, coherent pedagogy. This is not easy.” Beatty, I.D., Gerace, W.J., Leonard, W.J., Dufresne, R.J., Am. J. Phys 2006Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 88. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 89. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 90. • Peer InstructionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 91. • Peer InstructionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 92. • Peer InstructionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 93. • Peer InstructionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 94. • Peer Instruction – QuestionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 95. • Peer Instruction – QuestionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 96. • Peer Instruction – QuestionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 97. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual pollSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 98. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual pollSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 99. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual poll – Students discussSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 100. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual poll – Students discussSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 101. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual poll – Students discuss – RepollSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 102. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual poll – Students discuss – RepollSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 103. • Peer Instruction – Question – Individual poll – Students discuss – RepollSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 104. Reproduced from Eric Mazur (search “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube)Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 105. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 106. • The reduction in coverageSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 107. • The reduction in coverageSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 108. • The reduction in coverage – Departure from the A-Z content transmissionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 109. • The reduction in coverage – Departure from the A-Z content transmissionSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 110. • The reduction in coverage – Departure from the A-Z content transmission – The A-Z must be elsewhere (book, web, tutorial…)Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 111. • The reduction in coverage – Departure from the A-Z content transmission – The A-Z must be elsewhere (book, web, tutorial…)Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 112. • The reduction in coverage – Departure from the A-Z content transmission – The A-Z must be elsewhere (book, web, tutorial…) – The students must buy-in to “the learning contract”Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 113. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 114. • The first lecture is crucial – Why we are doing this – What we expect of them – Practice use with friendly questionsSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 115. • The first lecture is crucial – Why we are doing this – What we expect of them – Practice use with friendly questions • There is a learning curve – This is not an “out of the box” solution – Whole-team buy-inSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 116. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 117. • What makes a good question ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 118. • What makes a good question ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 119. • What makes a good question ? • How many to have each lecture ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 120. • What makes a good question ? • How many to have each lecture ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 121. • What makes a good question ? • How many to have each lecture ? • Where to place it / them ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 122. • What makes a good question ? • How many to have each lecture ? • Where to place it / them ?Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 123. • What makes a good question ? • How many to have each lecture ? • Where to place it / them ? • Beware shoe-horning content inSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 124. But does it work ? 50Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 125. Am. J. Phys. 66 1, January 1998 51Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 126. Reproduced from Eric Mazur (search “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube) 52Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 127. Reproduced from Eric Mazur (search “Confessions of a converted lecturer” on YouTube) 53Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 128. 54Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 129. 55Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 130. 55Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 131. The University of Edinburgh Edinburgh, Scotland 5th July, 2010 PeerWise bridging the gap between online learning and social media Paul Denny Department of Computer Science The University of Auckland New ZealandSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 132. Student familiarity with Web 2.0 The energy and Student creativity of a generated large class questionsSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 133. • Web-based MCQ repository built by students • Students: – develop new questions with associated explanations – answer existing questions and rate them for quality and difficulty – take part in discussions – compete with other students to appear on leaderboardsSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 134. 80Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 135. 81Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 136. 82Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 137. 83Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 138. 84Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 139. 85Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 140. 86Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 141. 87Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 142. • To date – 77 institutions – 557 courses – 33757 students have contributed – 94207 questions have been written – 2308854 answers have been submittedSunday, 22 May 2011
  • 143. PeerWise was introduced in workshop sessions in Week 5 Students worked through structured example task and devised own Qs in groups. 89Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 144. An assessment was set for the end of Week 6: Minimum requirements: • Write one question • Answer 5 • Comment on & rate 3 Contributed ~3% to course assessment 90Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 145. Uptake for in- course assessment Workshop Live Due training (class size of ~200) 350 questions in total ~3500 answers ~2000 comments 91Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 146. Uptake towards exam: No more questions submitted Assessed coursework deadline Exam ~170 answers 92Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 147. 93Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 148. 94Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 149. Quality of submissions: • Average quality was very good • Few trivial questions / nonsense distracters • Highest quality questions were EXCEPTIONALLY good 95Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 150. 96Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 151. 96Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 152. 96Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 153. 96Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 154. 97Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 155. Perceptions We sought student feedback both in ‘wash-up’ sessions after the assessment and in the end of course questionnaire 98Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 156. Positives 99Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 157. Positives 100Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 158. Negatives 101Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 159. The big question: does it improve performance? Don’t know. Yet. 102Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 160. A different question: Does degree of PeerWise use correlate with end of course performance? Yes, for the majority of students 103Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 161. Overall Statistics Median Split for Mean CA4 mark N Mean Exam Std. Error Mean p-value effect size lgCA4 LPA 25 107 55.49 1.46 0.000 0.2 MPA 40 87 62.85 1.76Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 162. Sunday, 22 May 2011
  • 163. EdPER group website bit.ly/EdPER s.p.bates@ed.ac.uk 106Sunday, 22 May 2011