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Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino
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Sanisera Field School, Session 10, 2010:A Guide to Roman Fishing, by Pascal Fiorentino

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  • 1. Something’s Fishy: A Guide to Roman Fishing By Pascal Fiorentino, Sanisera Mixed Session 10
  • 2. Fishermen overall were considered a low class in society, and usually managed to live only marginally above subsistence level. Fish was distributed in the Forum Piscarium. As the fish needed to be sold freshly or risk rotting, fishermen lived day-by-day.
  • 3. However, Roman fishermen sometimes formed guilds, such as the Corpus Piscatarium in Rome.
  • 4. Hey Pascal, how much did fish cost back then? Fish usually cost between half an ass and one ass. However, large an exotic fish were heavily prized, and could cost as much as25,000 asses.
  • 5. Fishing Methods Nets were usually made of woven hemp, and utilized lead weights to sink the net. This method, called casting. Fishing rods were also used, with hooks made of such materials as lead, stone, and bone. Smelly fish guts were often used as bait.
  • 6. Bronze Age Fishooks, found near Mahon, Menorca. A (very tan Roman?) man casting a net...
  • 7. Common fish ate by the Romans included Mackerel, Tuna, Swordfish, and anything else they could find. Octopus, oysters, mussels, and other crustaceans were also eaten all over the Mediterranean. Fish Farms (later Popular in Roman high society) used plumbing to breed rare and expensive fish.
  • 8. Fish in Roman Cooking • Most Roman coastal cities, as in ancient Greece, used fish as a staple protein. • Large or exotic fish were transported live in barrels to the market, and sold for exorbitant prices. • None of the fish was wasted; the guts were fermented, heavily salted, and formed into a fish sauce called garum.
  • 9. It´s been great guys, I miss you already! In memory of Carol Flannery

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