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Session no.1, 2010. Presentations: Late  Empire  Roman  Coins, by Alejandra Jiménez
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Session no.1, 2010. Presentations: Late Empire Roman Coins, by Alejandra Jiménez

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Now, you can see the presentations students from session no. 1 prepared. This is the one made by Alejandra Jiménez, on late Empire Roman coins, paying special attention to the Centenionalis, a type of …

Now, you can see the presentations students from session no. 1 prepared. This is the one made by Alejandra Jiménez, on late Empire Roman coins, paying special attention to the Centenionalis, a type of Roman coin frequently found in Sanitja.

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  • 1. Late Empire Roman Coins of Sanisera Alejandra Jim é nez Session 1, 2010
  • 2. Roman Currency
    • The Roman currency during most of the Roman Empire consisted of the aureus (gold), the denarius (silver), the sestertius (bronze), the dupondius (bronze), and the as (copper).
    • These were used from the middle of the third century BC until the middle of the third century A.D.
  • 3. Roman Currency
    • Aureus
    • Denaris
    • Sestertius
    • Dupondius
    • As
  • 4. Other Roman Coins
    • Centenionalis The bronze centenionalis were the attempts of Constans and Constantius II to reintroduce a large bronze coin, as the follis, had by then shrunk dramatically. The centionalis, however, did not last long and by the end of Theodosius the Great only smaller varieties of bronze coins were minted.
  • 5. Centenionalis
    • Constantine’s billion coinage initially followed the Diocletianic system but 318 Ad it diverged from the follis with the issue of even baser coins. This new coin weighed 3.0 g with the reverse type Victoriae Laetae Princ Perp (the joyful victoris of our everlasting ruler) It appears to have been tariffed as a 12 ½ denaritus piece. From 318 to 348 they declined from 3.0 g to 1.7g, and around 325 two new high-quality silver coins were introduced.
  • 6. Centenionalis
    • Centenionalis of Magnentius
    • Centenionalis of Constans
  • 7. FEL TEMP REPARATIO
    • On the reverse of some of Constans centenionalis there is a iconography of a man standing above his captive with a spear in his left hand, this motif is known as the Fel Temp Reparatio which has been attributed to this specific type of Contans coins. The meaning roughly translates to (Good times come again).
  • 8. Coins Found at Roman City Sanitja
  • 9. References
    • http://www.romanorum.com.au/Info/Help/denoms.asp
    • http://dougsmith.ancients.info/denom.html
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_currency
    • Adkins, Lesley, and Roy Adkins. Handbook to Life in Ancient Rome . New York, NY: Facts on File, 1994. Print.