Scherr BCF side event, SBSTA 6 June 2013

1,347 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,347
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
850
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Photo of Kijabe, Kenya
  • Source: http://www.unep.org/pdf/2012gapreport.pdfUNEP 2012. The Emissions Gap Report 2012. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi, pg. 11.Context:30% of all GHG comes from the land use sector (14% from ag). Potential for mitigation, but also sequestration.-only thing that can actually take carbon out of the atmosphere right nw. we’re around 380 at the moment, need to get down to 350-these technologies are available right away, don’t have to wait, like for wind and solar-if done wellyou can have co-benefitsincludingotherwatershed, biodiversity, as well as livelihoods
  • Source: http://www.unep.org/pdf/2012gapreport.pdfUNEP 2012. The Emissions Gap Report 2012. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi, pg. 31.
  • Cumulative carbon gained
  • Original Smith reference (not IPCC): http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/363/1492/789.full.pdf
  • Consensus around movement to scale. Using a new model: Climate-Smart Landscape
  • Many groups are starting to work on landscape scale projects, where mitigation may be a central theme or a co-benefit. FAO MICCA projects. 79 communities of practices working on landscape-scale collaboration and coordination with diverse entry pointsNew mechanisms (like Danone Livelihood Fund), sustainable landscapes fund, eta
  • From Abby re potential ILIs identified:I would say that, although only 104 ILIs participated in the survey, a broad brush survey identified more than 300 possible ILIs in LAC and this number almost certainly fails to capture numerous other grassroots efforts flying under the radar of international research organizations and donors….so you could just broaden that to include SSAFor agro-intensification ‘for example, organic production, conservation ag, no-till, IPM, improved fallows’Also, these percentages are activities reported by the Initiatives themselves. They also reported others in the landscape who did this things. If we reported that, it would be 10-20% higher.
  • Diversity of land uses across the landscapeFounded on the premise that resilience in Madagascar requires integrated solutions that affect the rice sector both directly and indirectly, the project explores a suite of practices including tree selection, improved livestock and land management, and preservation of ecosystem services (including the mitigation of climate change through building carbon stocks). Land uses in the region include highland forest, agroforest, and pasture, and lowland rice and crops. The project is promoting a model for integrated resilient rice (MIRR), which includes improved varieties, fertilizer use, and soil and water management, but also planting non-rice crops and implementing alternate land uses. Tree planting in highly eroded areas will be complemented by vegetable gardening along the bank of water bodies. Exact composition of practices will depend on the specific needs of the sites and their relation to one another Management of land use interactions at landscape scaleFor a more holistic approach to management, the model is incorporating elements of environmental, watershed level, and integrated pest and water management. Deforestation and land clearing upstream, and the resulting erosion and siltation, have direct impacts on downstream crop production and ecosystem health. Taking a wider watershed approach to management will help address these interactions and build on the synergies between land uses. For example, the project anticipates transitioning current poor livestock feed, manure, and grazing management practices to a more integrated system in which livestock systems can provide fertilizer for rice, and byproducts of the crops can be used for feed or fuel
  • Diversity of land uses across the landscapeFounded on the premise that resilience in Madagascar requires integrated solutions that affect the rice sector both directly and indirectly, the project explores a suite of practices including tree selection, improved livestock and land management, and preservation of ecosystem services (including the mitigation of climate change through building carbon stocks). Land uses in the region include highland forest, agroforest, and pasture, and lowland rice and crops. The project is promoting a model for integrated resilient rice (MIRR), which includes improved varieties, fertilizer use, and soil and water management, but also planting non-rice crops and implementing alternate land uses. Tree planting in highly eroded areas will be complemented by vegetable gardening along the bank of water bodies. Exact composition of practices will depend on the specific needs of the sites and their relation to one another Management of land use interactions at landscape scaleFor a more holistic approach to management, the model is incorporating elements of environmental, watershed level, and integrated pest and water management. Deforestation and land clearing upstream, and the resulting erosion and siltation, have direct impacts on downstream crop production and ecosystem health. Taking a wider watershed approach to management will help address these interactions and build on the synergies between land uses. For example, the project anticipates transitioning current poor livestock feed, manure, and grazing management practices to a more integrated system in which livestock systems can provide fertilizer for rice, and byproducts of the crops can be used for feed or fuel
  • ICRAF landscape surveillance methodology is not solely the Carbon Benefits Project, but a series of external partnerships with various organizations and national governments to develop multiple methods of landscape monitoring. with: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFS/RP17167.pdfREDD – ALERT: Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation through Alternative Land uses in Rainforests of the TropicsALL – REDDI: The Accountability and Local Level Initiative to Reduce Emission from Deforestation and Degradation)Source: http://worldagroforestry.org/research/climate_change/mitigation
  • Scherr BCF side event, SBSTA 6 June 2013

    1. 1. Achieving Mitigation at Scale throughClimate-Smart LandscapesSara J. Scherr, President, EcoAgriculture PartnersEnabling Land Use Activities in Developing Countries’ Context: Constraints andOpportunities,UNFCCC SBSTA 38Bonn, Germany6 May 2013
    2. 2. Emissions from land use:22% of global greenhouse gas emissionsGHG emissions bysector in 2010, Source:UNEPForestry, 11%Agriculture, 11%Waste, 4%Energy, 35%Industry, 18%Transport, 13%Building, 8%Shares of GHG Emissions by Sector
    3. 3. Sector Emission reduction potential in2020 (GtCO2e)Agriculture 1.1 – 4.3Forestry 1.3 – 4.2Power 2.2 – 3.9Industry 1.5 – 4.6Transport 1.7 – 2.5Buildings 1.4 – 2.9Waste Around 0.8Total (Full range) 10 – 23Total 17 +/- 3Sectoral GHG emission reduction potentials in 2020Source: UNEP 2012. The Emissions Gap Report 2012. United NationsEnvironment Programme (UNEP).
    4. 4. Rationale for climate mitigationstrategy at landscape scale1) Lower aggregate cost for net emissionreduction through diverse land uses2) Uses land to fullest potential by capability3) Recognizes the interdependence of landuses (spatial, temporal)4) Carbon-rich landscapes support climateadaptation, livelihood development andother ecosysteml benefits5) Potential for action at scale
    5. 5. Mitigation potential of forest conservationand afforestation/reforestationSource: Palm 2000 (ASB)
    6. 6. Mitigation potentialfrom other land useinterventions– beyondafforestation andreforestationSource: CCAFS Big Facts 2013,data from Smith et al 2008
    7. 7. Climate-smart landscapes:Food, livelihoods, mitigation, resilience, ecosystemsMitigation is not the primary motivation for action—but the co-benefitfrom actions mobilized by land managers and large political constituencies
    8. 8. Multi-stakeholder negotiation and planning
    9. 9. Landscape-scale innovation on the ground:79 communities of practice identified
    10. 10. Climate mitigation in integrated landscapeinitiativesLatin America & Caribbean Sub-Saharan Africa# Potential IntegratedLandscape Initiatives Identified> 300 > 150# Integrated LandscapeInitiatives Documented104 87# Countries Represented 21 33Most Common Motivations forStakeholder CollaborationBiodiversity Conservation,Reducing Natural ResourceDegradationBiodiversity and NaturalResource ConservationAverage # Primary StakeholdersInvolved in Initiative11(farmers, local government,NGOs)9+(local/districtgovernment, NGOs,producer groups)Landscapes for People, Food and Nature Iniiative, Continental Reviews
    11. 11. Climate mitigation in integrated landscapeinitiativesLatin America & Caribbean Sub-Saharan Africa% of initiatives for which‘mitigating climate change orobtaining carbon credits wasan objective73% 41%Agro-ecological intensification 65% 53%Agroforestry 59% 53%Soil conservation 67% 70%Improved forestrymanagement48% 56%Estratda, et al. 2013, submitted
    12. 12. Case 1: Climate-smart rice landscapes inMadagascarLocation: LakeAlaotra-Mangorosubregion, Eastern arc of centralhighlandsScale: 20,984 km2, 30,000 farmers inregion of 125,000-150,000Financing: $5,104,925- Adaptation FundKey investments: Integrated resilient rice(MIRR) - improved varieties, SWMOn-farm mitigation practices:Intercropping, cover cropping,agroforestry, mulching, System of RiceIntensification (SRI)Landscape-scale mitigation practices:Integrated watershed management,tree-planting, limiting deforestation
    13. 13. Case 2: Sahel and West Africa program insupport of the Great GreenWall InitiativeLocation: Western Africa and SaheliancountriesScale: 12 countries, countries identifygeographic prioritiesFinancing: $80.4 m GEF, $20.4 LeastDeveloped Countries Fund, $4.6 m SpecialClimate Change Fund (SCCF), co-financingof $1.8 billion from WB in 12 countriesOn-farm mitigation practices: SustainableLand and water management (SLWM)practices including water erosion control,windbreaks, agroforestry and conservationtillageLandscape-scale mitigation practices:Land rehabilitation, reduced deforestation,forest buffer zones, wildlife corridors,rotational grazing, community forestry
    14. 14. Advances in landscape-scale monitoring acrossmultiple dimensions CDM Agroforestrymethodology NewVCS (SALM) Carbon Benefits Project ICRAF landscape surveillance REDD – ALERT (ICRAF, EU) The Earth Partners VCS SHAMBA SAMPLES
    15. 15. Policy recommendations to promotelandscape-scale climate mitigation1) Incorporate mitigationbenefits into all sectoralinvestments2) Align policy across sectors& jurisdictions3) Support stakeholderforums to coordinatesectoral and spatialactivities and investments
    16. 16. Thank yousscherr@ecoagriculture.orgwww.ecoagriculture.orglandscapes.ecoagriculture.org

    ×