design studio
CURRICULUM
innovative strategies to solve your sustainability challenge
awakening solutions in the minds of ...
© 2012
WWW.ECORISE.ORG
INFO@ECORISE.ORG
INTRO TO ECORISE DESIGN STUDIO 	 2
DESIGN THINKING & PROJECT-BASED LEARNING 	 3
APPLICATION IN THE CLASSROOM 	 4
ESSENTIAL...
teacher’s guide
6
Learned Skills
Through the Design Studio curriculum, students will develop and strengthen
the following ...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 7
EMPATHY
INTERCONNECTEDNESS
STEWARDSHIP
LEADERSHIP
OPTIMISM
CREATIVI...
teacher’s guide
14
The EcoRise Design Process
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 15
Design Thinking Lessons
Each of the five phases of the Design Proc...
IDENTIFY
16
SYSTEMS THINKING
VISIONING
EMPATHY
INTERCONNECTEDNESS
STEWARDSHIP
Students will be able to expand their percep...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 17
# Activity Description					
Mind Map
Walking in
Your Shoes
Venn
Di...
IDENTIFY
20
1.	 This activity can be completed either as an entire class or in small teams.
2.	 If students have completed...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 21
EXAMPLE
EXPLORE
26
SYSTEMS-THINKING
VISIONING
EMPATHY
INTERCONNECTEDNESS
Students will be able to expand their perception and deve...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 27
# Activity Description					
Detective
Wall
Insight
Storming
Weavin...
EXPLORE
36
SWOT ANALYSIS
activity #5
1.	 Divide students by design team and have them draw the SWOT chart or use the templ...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 37
EXAMPLE
CREATE
50
DESIGN
TECHNOLOGY
INNOVATIVE
PROBLEM SOLVING
OPTIMISM
CREATIVITY
Students will be able to utilize design-thinkin...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 51
# Activity Description					
ACTIVITY ROAD MAP
SCAMPER
Cards
MindFl...
REFINE
64
DESIGN
TECHNOLOGY
INNOVATIVE
PROBLEM SOLVING
OPTIMISM
CREATIVITY
Students will be able to utilize design-thinkin...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 65
ACTIVITY ROAD MAP
# Activity Description					
Snap
Judgment
Dot
De...
REFINE
70
BOP QUIZ
activity #3
1.	 Divide students into design teams and hand out a large sheet of paper. Instruct student...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 71
EXAMPLE
Design Challenge:
Originality Probability Total
Healthy ve...
REFINE
84
STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN
activity #10
MATERIALS TIME FRAME 60-90 Mins.
1.	 Open the class with a brief discussion a...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 85
EXAMPLE
REFLECTION
QUESTIONS
+  Did this process help you think th...
SHARE
88
PRESENTATION
TECHNOLOGY
COMMUNICATION
LEADERSHIP
EMPOWERMENT
Students will be able to develop confidence, self an...
EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 89
# Activity Description					
Success
Storming
Hot Off the
Press
Man...
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EcoRise Youth Innovations: Design Studio (curriculum sample)

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EcoRise Youth Innovations: Design Studio (curriculum sample)

  1. 1. design studio CURRICULUM innovative strategies to solve your sustainability challenge awakening solutions in the minds of the next generation ™
  2. 2. © 2012 WWW.ECORISE.ORG INFO@ECORISE.ORG
  3. 3. INTRO TO ECORISE DESIGN STUDIO 2 DESIGN THINKING & PROJECT-BASED LEARNING 3 APPLICATION IN THE CLASSROOM 4 ESSENTIAL COMPONENTS OF SUCCESSFUL DESIGN PROJECTS 5 LEARNED SKILLS & ENDURING PRINCIPLES 6 BEST PRACTICES FOR IMPLEMENTATION 8 STUDENT PORTFOLIOS 9 TOOLS AND RESOURCES 10 VOCABULARY 12 THE DESIGN PROCESS 14 IDENTIFY 16 EXPLORE 26 CREATE 50 REFINE 64 SHARE 88 ACTIVITY TEMPLATES 107 ACTIVITY CARDS 139 design studio table of contents teacher’s guide design thinking lessons supplementary materials TABLE OF CONTENTS
  4. 4. teacher’s guide 6 Learned Skills Through the Design Studio curriculum, students will develop and strengthen the following 21st century skills: INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING DESIGN SYSTEMS THINKING TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATION VISIONING COMMUNICATION Students will be able to stimulate creative, solutions-based thinking through analysis and improvement of existing ideas, and developing social entrepreneurship mindsets and skills. Students will be able to utilize design-thinking methods and processes to explore and build creative solutions by sketching, modeling, creating, experimenting, constructing, and calculating. Students will be able to expand their perception and develop systems thinking skills by analyzing and understanding multiple perspectives and inferring dynamic connections. Students will be able to enhance their design experience and technology literacy through digital modeling, online research, computer software, social media, and communication technologies. Students will be able to develop confidence, self-awareness, creativity and presentation skills through public speaking, and engaging visual presentations such as design boards and portfolios. Students will be able to imagine solutions to environmental challenges through identifying their project purpose while brainstorming, reflecting, mapping, visualizing, and investigating. Students will be able to articulate their ideas and develop their communication skills through group collaboration, public speaking, persuasive presentations, active listening, and marketing strategies.
  5. 5. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 7 EMPATHY INTERCONNECTEDNESS STEWARDSHIP LEADERSHIP OPTIMISM CREATIVITY EMPOWERMENT Being of service to the world begins with a posture of empathy. We are grateful for our own gifts and blessings, and have compassion for the struggles others face. We listen and learn from them, in an effort to slow our assumptions, we walk in their shoes and develop solutions that will last. The world is incredibly complex, yet connected. The welfare of humans and nature are woven together. We honor the diversity of our global community and reflect on our influence in this world. The planet has limits. We have reverence for these laws and recognize our impact and responsibility as a global citizen. We are mindful of our actions and the legacy we leave to future generations. Great leaders challenge themselves and others to dream big. We are visionaries who are dedicated to building a better future with passion, humility and integrity. Change is possible and solutions are everywhere. We celebrate the power of ideas and believe that the investment in human ingenuity will result in health and prosperity for all. Imagination is the key to innovation. We cultivate our creative potential by suspending all judgment and allowing the experience of play, inspiration, intuition, freedom, fun, and joy. Everyone has the potential to change the world. We recognize and celebrate our unique brilliance. With this knowledge, we can fuel ourselves and inspire the world to take action. Embedded within the Design Studio lessons, are deeper principles, intended to enrich one’s relationship to self and community. Enduring Principles
  6. 6. teacher’s guide 14 The EcoRise Design Process
  7. 7. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 15 Design Thinking Lessons Each of the five phases of the Design Process has multiple lessons you can choose to integrate into the Design Studio. Select whichever activities seem that most suitable for your students’ projects and that appeal to your teaching style. There are no mandatory lessons, however we do recommend that each step of the Design Process have a minimum of three activities so that students may thoughtfully explore their design challenge and develop the most effective solutions. The Design Process The EcoRise Design Process will be the map and guidelines for the student design projects. It is through this process students will begin to cultivate their inner creative designer and innovative thinker. So what is a designer? Here is how we like to define it… DESIGNER: a transformative change-maker who sees the world’s problems as creative challenges and failures as opportunities for growth. The goal of this curriculum is to stimulate the inherent designer in all of us! Through the EcoRise Design Process students will learn to cultivate the Designer mindset, and work to create a solution to sustainability challenges. Each phase of the process connects to specific Enduring Principles and Learned Skills, and each phase has essential questions, objectives, activities, and assessments that can be used and incorporated into any design project. Students will be assessed at each phase in order to move on to the next, and assessments and deliverables will be kept in a student design portfolio which can serve as the major summative assessment.
  8. 8. IDENTIFY 16 SYSTEMS THINKING VISIONING EMPATHY INTERCONNECTEDNESS STEWARDSHIP Students will be able to expand their perception and develop systems thinking skills by analyzing and understanding multiple perspectives and inferring dynamic connections. Students will be able to imagine solutions to environmental challenges through identifying their project purpose while brainstorming, reflecting, mapping, visualizing, and investigating. Being of service to the world begins with a posture of empathy. We are grateful for our own gifts and blessings, and have compassion for the struggles others face. We listen and learn from them, in an effort to slow our assumptions, we walk in their shoes and develop solutions that will last. The world is incredibly complex, yet connected. The welfare of humans and nature are woven together. We honor the diversity of our global community and reflect on our influence in this world. The planet has limits. We have reverence for these laws and recognize our impact and responsibility as a global citizen. We are mindful of our actions and the legacy we leave to future generations. intro to activities Objectives Essential Questions Assessment Skills & Principles + Identify an environmental challenge to investigate for their project. + Assess a diverse array of stakeholder viewpoints and roles within the challenge. + Analyze personal assumptions and biases they may have upon entering this challenge. + Articulate their ultimate purpose and aspirational goal for their project. + How is this challenge impacting the environment and the community? + Who are the stakeholders in this challenge and what biases might they have in regards to it? + What assumptions exist in regards to this challenge? + What is the ultimate goal and purpose for this project? + All activities in this phase can be used as formative assessments. Students should save their work in a project portfolio, which can serve as a major summative assessment. OVERVIEW
  9. 9. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 17 # Activity Description Mind Map Walking in Your Shoes Venn Diagram The Road Home 1 2 3 4 Students create a diagram representing ideas, stakeholders and issues that are connected to their design challenge. Students identify the stakeholders within their design challenge and seek to understand their viewpoint. By “walking in another person’s shoes”, students develop empathy and insights which will deeply inform the direction of their design. Students illustrate how different stakeholders relate to each other compare their own perspective on the design challenge to that of the other stakeholders involved. Students articulate their ultimate purpose, expectations, goals, fears and needs upon launching into their design challenge. This document is used as a guiding reference throughout the design process. ACTIVITY ROAD MAP
  10. 10. IDENTIFY 20 1. This activity can be completed either as an entire class or in small teams. 2. If students have completed a mind map, have them use it to ignite this activity. If not, have the students list or diagram all the stakeholders in this challenge. 3. Create Empathy Stations around the classroom for each identified stakeholder, and label each with the following categories: + Needs: what does the stakeholder need throughout their day in regards to this challenge? + Knowledge: what does the stakeholder know about this challenge? + Frustrations: what frustrates and challenges the stakeholder in regards to this issue? + Personal Perspective: what biases might this stakeholder have in regards to this challenge? + Rewards: what rewards does the stakeholder receive from this challenge? What reward would the stakeholder receive from your design? 4. Ask students to rotate between each station and live a day in the life of each stakeholders. Encourage them to experience the stakeholder’s perspective. Have students imagine going through that person’s day from morning through night. How do their needs and frustrations change throughout the day? Have them write down or draw their impressions within each category on a post-it note. 5. Review responses as a class to create a collective understanding of the stakeholder’s perspectives. BACKGROUND MATERIALS TIME FRAME REFLECTION QUESTIONS ACTIVITY GUIDELINES Students identify the stakeholders within their design challenge and seek to understand their viewpoint. By “walking in another person’s shoes”, students develop empathy and insights which will deeply inform the direction of their design. Paper pen Post-it notes activity #2 WALKING IN YOUR SHOES + Why is it important to understand a stake-holder’s perspective? + How does stakeholder analysis help us as designers? 30-60 Mins.
  11. 11. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 21 EXAMPLE
  12. 12. EXPLORE 26 SYSTEMS-THINKING VISIONING EMPATHY INTERCONNECTEDNESS Students will be able to expand their perception and develop systems thinking skills by analyzing and understanding multiple perspectives and inferring dynamic connections. Students will be able to imagine solutions to environmental challenges through identifying their project purpose while brainstorming, reflecting, mapping, visualizing, and investigating. Being of service to the world begins with a posture of empathy. We are grateful for our own gifts and blessings, and have compassion for the struggles others face. We listen and learn from them, in an effort to slow our assumptions, we walk in their shoes and develop solutions that will last. The world is incredibly complex, yet connected. The welfare of humans and nature are woven together. We honor the diversity of our global community and reflect on our influence in this world. intro to activities Objectives Essential Questions Assessment Skills Principles + Research stakeholder viewpoints in order to gain a deeper perspective on the challenge. + Investigate existing design solutions to the challenge in order to cultivate design inspiration. + Whose shoes do we need to walk in to understand and gain insights into this challenge? + How can we use design and innovation to engineer creative solutions to this challenge? + Can existing design solutions be improved or is a new innovative approach required to solve this challenge? + All activities in this phase can be used as formative assessments for students and included in the design portfolio. OVERVIEW
  13. 13. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 27 # Activity Description Detective Wall Insight Storming Weaving Genius Multiple Personalities SWOT Analysis Systems Spiral The W Race Evolving Innovation Embody Walk Great Minds Think Alike StoryBooth Students conduct an investigation of their design challenge while collecting information and insights on a collage board. Students examine the perspective and experiences of their “client” in order to develop empathy, customer insights and a deeper understanding of the issue. Students assess how their design challenge can be tackled from the perspective of various academic subjects. Students experience working with different personality types and perspectives by analyzing the challenge from various stakeholders’ points of view. Students analyze their design challenge through diagramming the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. Students identify, analyze and plot the various systems surrounding their design challenge for the purpose of exploring the issues from a micro and macro perspective. Students race to answer the 5 W questions about their design challenge in order to understand the Who, What, When, Where, and Why of their project. Students analyze the history of their design challenge by mapping past and present-day solutions and forecasting future innovations. Students deepen their understanding of their design challenge by embodying the experience of their clients and various stakeholders through role-play and site visits. Students will use famous quotes from the world’s great thinkers to assess their design challenge from new perspectives. Students take on the role of reporter through interviewing their stakeholder groups in order to understand their needs and wants in design. ACTIVITY ROAD MAP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  14. 14. EXPLORE 36 SWOT ANALYSIS activity #5 1. Divide students by design team and have them draw the SWOT chart or use the template provided. 2. Explain that in any undertaking, whether it is a campus project or launching a business, it is always smart to start by assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the venture, as well as forecasting any future scenarios that may influence the success of the project. 3. Instruct students to write their design challenge in the middle of the SWOT chart and brainstorm the Strengths, Weaknesses, Threats and Opportunities. If the teams are large, students can silently write their ideas on post-it notes first. When they are finished, they can add them to the chart and begin clustering the notes by affinity groups. + STRENGTHS - What assets and advantages does your team have? What benefits does your solution offer? Do you have resources, knowledge, skills or public support? + WEAKNESSES - What are the challenges in your design solution? Is your team or project missing any skills, resources or knowledge? + OPPORTUNITIES - What new strategies or partnerships could be on the horizon that would allow your project to flourish? + THREATS - Can you foresee any future circumstances that may threaten the success of your design solution? Are there things that are out of your control? 4. After the students have pooled their ideas onto the team SWOT chart, have them analyze the quadrants. Instruct each student to draw a dot next to the three responses they feel are the most critical in each category. 5. After the dot voting is calculated, have the design teams share their findings and insights with the class. BACKGROUND MATERIALS TIME FRAME REFLECTION QUESTIONS ACTIVITY GUIDELINES Students assess their design challenge through diagramming the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. The SWOT Analysis, originally developed by Albert Humphrey, is a popular technique used to gauge an organization’s current state against upcoming opportunities and dangers. Paper pen Post-it notes (optional) 15-30 Mins. + How can you take advantage of the strengths in your design and within your team to the fullest? + Are there weaknesses that could be improved upon easily? + Are there threats that could be mitigated with a little planning or research?
  15. 15. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 37 EXAMPLE
  16. 16. CREATE 50 DESIGN TECHNOLOGY INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING OPTIMISM CREATIVITY Students will be able to utilize design-thinking methods and processes to explore and build creative solutions by sketching, modeling, creating, experimenting, constructing, and calculating. Students will be able to enhance their design experience and technology literacy through digital modeling, online research, computer software, social media, and communication technologies. Students will be able to stimulate creative solutions based thinking through analysis and improvement of existing ideas, and developing social entrepreneurship mindsets and skills. Change is possible and solutions are everywhere. We celebrate the power of ideas and believe that the investment in human ingenuity will result in health and prosperity for all. Imagination is the key to innovation. We cultivate our creative potential by suspending all judgment and allowing the experience of play, inspiration, intuition, freedom, fun, and joy. intro to activities Objectives Essential Questions Assessment Skills Principles + Brainstorm potential design solutions to solve an environmental challenge. + Invent and design a solution to the environmental challenge. + Create a model and prototype of their proposed design solution. + Assess how their design functions and solves the environmental challenge. + How does brainstorming help us cultivate new ideas and stimulate our creativity? + How can design be used to solve an environmental challenge? + Quick Models and Ideatoons can serve as summative assessments for the unit. OVERVIEW
  17. 17. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 51 # Activity Description ACTIVITY ROAD MAP SCAMPER Cards MindFlip Graphic Glyphs Creature Collision Ideatoon Quick Models 1 2 3 4 5 6 Students cultivate new ideas using SCAMPER cards, a brainstorming technique which generates creative solutions to any design challenge. Students develop new design solutions by listing all of their existing assumptions about the challenge and then inverting those beliefs to approach the issue from the opposite perspective. Students combine visual and verbal reasoning by creating a graphic alphabet to illustrate the different elements of a design. Students will use biomimicry principles to analyze how nature creates solutions and develop design ideas that are inspired by nature’s “operating instructions”. Students will exercise visual thinking and sketching techniques by drawing an illustration of their design solution including any processes and relationships surrounding the challenge. Students experiment with design ideas by constructing quick models using everyday materials.
  18. 18. REFINE 64 DESIGN TECHNOLOGY INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING OPTIMISM CREATIVITY Students will be able to utilize design-thinking methods and processes to explore and build creative solutions by sketching, modeling, creating, experimenting, constructing, and calculating. Students will be able to enhance their design experience and technology literacy through digital modeling, online research, computer software, social media, and communication technologies. Students will be able to stimulate creative solutions based thinking through analysis and improvement of existing ideas, and developing social entrepreneurship mindsets and skills. Change is possible and solutions are everywhere. We celebrate the power of ideas and believe that the investment in human ingenuity will result in health and prosperity for all. Imagination is the key to innovation. We cultivate our creative potential by suspending all judgment and allowing the experience of play, inspiration, intuition, freedom, fun, and joy. intro to activities Objectives Essential Questions Assessment Skills Principles + Evaluate areas of strength and growth in their design solution. + Assess and imagine how to improve their innovative design solution. + Create an improved and refined version of their design solution. + Why is it important to analyze our designs with an objective eye and receive feedback? + How does refining help us improve in order to create even better design solutions? + Model Making and the Business Model Canvas can serve as summative assessments for this phase. All other activities are excellent formative assessments. OVERVIEW
  19. 19. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 65 ACTIVITY ROAD MAP # Activity Description Snap Judgment Dot Democracy BOP Quiz Product Puppetry Pain-Gain Map Test of Time Eco-Target Ripple Effect Model-making Strategic Action Plan Business Model Canvas Students will use a card-sorting method to quickly critique all of their potential design ideas against various criteria such as viability, impact, novelty, budget, etc. Students will use a non-verbal voting process to identify their favorite design elements and ideas from a generated list of possibilities. Students will rate their various design ideas options based on three criteria: to what degree is it Beneficial, Original and Probable. Students will personify and give human characteristics to their design idea in order to develop the elements and personality of their final design solution. Students will analyze the “Pains” (challenges) and “Gains” (strengths) of a potential design solution in order to determine areas for refinement and trouble-shooting. Students will analyze the past, present, and future life-cycle of their design solution with a focus on its social and environmental impacts. Students will evaluate how their design solution impacts and is connected to all aspects of sustainability: water, air, energy, waste, food, transportation, and community spaces. Students will analyze causal relationships by considering the positive and negative impacts their design solution can have on oneself, school, city, state, country and world. Students will construct a full-size or small-scale prototype of their design solution to be used in their final presentations with an emphasis on both style and function. Student will develop a clear plan to implement their design solution, by creating a timeline and analyzing tasks, people and resources needed to turn their idea into a reality. Students will create a simple, clear business plan using the Business Model Canvas, an innovative new tool for entrepreneurs. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  20. 20. REFINE 70 BOP QUIZ activity #3 1. Divide students into design teams and hand out a large sheet of paper. Instruct students to write their design challenge across the top of the paper. Beneath the title, have them draw the BOP Quiz chart (see example). 2. Down the left column, have students write their various design solution ideas. 3. Explain to students that they will evaluate each of their various design options, based on the following criteria... + Benefits: Is this idea useful? Does it make a big impact and create a real solution to the root problem? Any idea that benefits lots of different stakeholders and is a long-lasting solution should score well. + Originality: Is this is a new solution or a new approach to a common problem? Is it more innovative than similar ideas that have come before it?The newer and more unique the solution, the higher it will score. + Probability: Is your design feasible? Can it actually be done? Do you have all the resources and skills to implement it? Elements and ideas that have the fewest barriers and require less effort will score higher here. 4. Students will begin rating each idea and component on a scale from 1 to 10 (1= lowest score, 10=highest score) based on the level of Benefits, Originality and Probability. Have students score each idea one-by-one and remind them that they should score each design idea with the same level of scrutiny. 5. After the students have rated the ideas on each of the three criteria, have them add the three numbers to create a master score for each design idea. 6. Allow students to analyze and discuss the outcomes from the BOP Quiz and share the results with the class. BACKGROUND MATERIALS TIME FRAME ACTIVITY GUIDELINES Students will use forced ranking to rate their various design idea options based on three criteria: to what degree is it Beneficial, Original and Probable. When design teams are brainstorming ideas or evaluating a design it is helpful to have a “reality check” on design ideas and elements. Large paper Colored markers 15-30 Mins. REFLECTION QUESTIONS + How can you improve your design using this information? + Did the BOP Quiz uncover any surprising strengths or weaknesses of your design? + Are there any other judging criteria that you think should be added to the BOP Quiz?
  21. 21. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 71 EXAMPLE Design Challenge: Originality Probability Total Healthy vending machines Edible gardens for cafeteria School-wide composting Sponsor a farm Academic credit for food team members 100% compostable packaging products Education campaign 4 9 7 2 8 6 9 Improving the food system on campus 2 9 4 1 6 2 10 13 20 14 13 23 11 19 7 2 3 10 9 3 0 BenefitsSolution Ideas
  22. 22. REFINE 84 STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN activity #10 MATERIALS TIME FRAME 60-90 Mins. 1. Open the class with a brief discussion about the importance of a Strategic Action Plan. Although the world needs great innovators and brilliant new solutions, these ideas have no impact if you do not have the skills to take action and turn your inspired dreams into reality. Project implementation requires incredible planning, persistence and follow-through. It also requires flexibility because no matter how well we plan, along the way we are usually met with unforeseen challenges and new opportunities. For this reason, the Strategic Action Plan is a “living document” that will be revisited and adjusted as the project unfolds. 2. Divide students into their design teams and hand out a large sheet of paper (or print out the template provided). Ask students to start by writing their original design challenge across the top, followed by their proposed design solution. 3. Next have students decide upon the timeframe in which they will be implementing their project. For some projects, this may be pure speculation and for many, it may be related to the school calendar and what can be accomplished within the semester or within the following school year. Have students write out the timeframe in the Strategic Action Plan template. 4. Ask students to determine what their ultimate goal is within this timeframe. Although there may be long-term goals, such as creating a zero-waste campus, instruct the students to identify what goal they can accomplish within the given timeframe. What would success look like at the end of this period? 5. Either on sticky notes or directly on the paper, have students begin charting every task that must be completed in order to achieve their goal. The tasks are then plotted along the timeline. The timeline can be broken into days, weeks or months. 6. After every task has been identified and plotted on the calendar, have the students analyze what resources are needed for each task (such as materials or funds) and write those in the chart. 7. As students assess the resources needed for each task, have them also analyze who is involved with each task, whether it is community members, school staff or specific students. This may also be a place to assign team members to certain responsibilities. Students may even consider creating special Task Forces to work on certain aspects of the project, such as marketing, construction, sales, etc. 8. When students have finished filling out their Strategic Action Plan, ask them to share any insights they may have gained from this process. BACKGROUND ACTIVITY GUIDELINES Student will develop a clear plan to implement their design solution, by creating a timeline and analyzing tasks, people and resources needed to turn their idea into a reality. Creating the Strategic Action Plan is an essential exercise which develops 21st century skills such as planning, budgeting, project management, delegation and teamwork. Large paper Colored markers Sticky notes
  23. 23. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 85 EXAMPLE REFLECTION QUESTIONS + Did this process help you think through some details you had not yet considered? + Can you imagine how you could use the Strategic Action Plan in other areas of your life (such as homework, preparing for college, extracurricular activities)? Who’s involvedTask Design Challenge Our Solutions Our Goal Resources Needed Timeline Jan Jan Feb Mar Apr May Launch plastic bottle drive at school to collect materials Experiment with plastic materials make 15 prototypes Decide on final product to sell and begin producing (100 by April 1st)) Create 1-page summary identify community partners to sell our items. Set up product displays at 4-6 shops. Visit weekly to collect and restock. Continue visiting shops and close sales on 5/15. Send thank you cards. Poster board bins 50 plastic bottles 150 plastic bottles Paper, printer, computer Display materials product Cards for shop owners. Entire school Design team Design team Outreach team Outreach team Outreach team Reduce Waste throughTrash-to-Treasure Project Make upcycled products from plastic bottles Design a new product made out of plastic bottles that we can sell at local stores. Produce at least 100 items which raise $1000. Jan 4 - May 20 2013
  24. 24. SHARE 88 PRESENTATION TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION LEADERSHIP EMPOWERMENT Students will be able to develop confidence, self and whole awareness, creativity, and presentation skills through public speaking, and engaging visual presentations such as design boards and portfolios. Students will be able to enhance their design experience and technology literacy through digital modeling, online research, computer software, social media, and communication technologies. Students will be able to articulate their ideas and develop their communication skills through group collaboration, public speaking, persuasive presentations, active listening, and marketing strategies. Great leaders challenge themselves and others to dream big. We are visionaries who are dedicated to building a better future with passion, humility and integrity. Everyone has the potential to change the world. We recognize and celebrate our unique brilliance. With this knowledge, we can fuel ourselves and inspire the world to take action. intro to activities Objectives Essential Questions Assessment Skills Principles + Create a presentation and design board showcasing their design solution + Effectively articulate and communicate their experience with the design process + Visually and verbally present and empower others with their design solutions + What is the story and message we want to tell about our design? + How can our presentation deliver our message in the most compelling way? + How can we engage, inspire and empower our community through our design? + The Design Board and Final Presentation can serve as summative assessments for this phase. All other activities are excellent formative assessments. OVERVIEW
  25. 25. EcoRise Youth Innovations – Design Studio Curriculum 89 # Activity Description Success Storming Hot Off the Press Manifesto Elevator Pitch Mini-Saga Poster Art Propaganda Design Board 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Students will visualize an optimal future for their design solutions by illustrating their success story. Students will imagine their design solution has been featured on the cover of a magazine and develop the messaging and pitch. Students will consider their ideal customer, develop a brand promise and write a declaration of their principles for their design solution. Students will develop a 30 second elevator pitch about their design, refining their design solution to the most essential message. Students write a whimsical short story in 50 words or less that creatively capture the character or impact of their design solution. Students will create their own poster art propaganda to influence public opinion and spread the message about their green design solution. Students will create a multi-media display board to showcase their final design innovation, including evidence of their creative process. ACTIVITY ROAD MAP

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