Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Book List 2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Book List 2011

1,224

Published on

EarthSoft CEO's reading list

EarthSoft CEO's reading list

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,224
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. 1. Everything I know about Marketing I Learned from Google, Aaron Goldman2. Presentation Zen Design, Simple Design Principles and Techniques to Enhance Your Presentations, by Garr Reynolds. Reynolds second book on design. "To change the world, you need to pitch. To pitch, you need to design. To design, you need this book" - Guy Karasaki. Pretty much everything Reynolds says NOT to do with Powerpoint describes almost every Powerpoint I give!!3. Dealings, by Felix Rohatyn How NY City was saved by a cigarette...following on the biography of Rohatyn I read in 2009.4. Moneymakers, the Wicked Lives and Surprising Adventures of three Notorious Counterfeiters, by Ben Tarnoff5. House of Lies, How Management Consultants Steal Your Watch and Then Tell You The Time, by Martin Kihn The best book by a Michael Lewis wannabe, once youve read everything by Michael Lewis.6. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine LEngle My Nora made me read this and Im glad she did.7. Levittown: Two Families, One Tycoon, and the Fight for Civil Rights in Americas Legendary Suburb, by David Kushner From Publishers Weekly Migration to suburbia has long been an American ambition, but its allure was never stronger than in the post-WWII years, when the fantasy of a dream house played to the imagination of millions of Americans, especially returning veterans. Already waiting for many of them was a model community on the North Shore of Long Island called Levittown, the brainchild of Abraham Levitt and his sons, William and Alfred, the nations first real estate tycoons. But Levittown came with its own set of requirements: perfectly manicured lawns, no fences and no black families. In 1957, as the Levitts—by now massively successful and nationally lauded—had already expanded to a second model city, two families challenged the segregationist policy: one, a white Jewish Communist family, secretly arranged for the other, a black family, to buy the house next door. In an entertaining round-robin format, Kushner relays each partys story in the leadup to a combustible summer when
  2. the integration of Americas most famous suburb caused the downfall of a titan and transformed the nation. (Feb.) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From School Library Journal Adult/High School—In 1957, Levittown, PA, was known as a remarkable suburb. It was built by the innovative Abe Levitt & Sons, who used the new mass-production techniques for a planned community that could be constructed quickly, included comfortable homes with state-of-the-art appliances, and was affordable for returning veterans. The covenants, however, implied that the community was for whites only, and this policy was backed up by Home Owners Loan Corporation. When Lew and Bea Wechsler, disillusioned Communists and civil rights advocates, decided to challenge this policy and help a black couple, Daisy and Bill Myers, move next door, mob violence immediately occurred, some of which was instigated by outsiders who were members of the KKK. This account centers on the background of the two families and their growing friendship as they endured vicious attacks by their neighbors and the apathetic protection of the police. It is also the story of the Levitt family: Abe, the brilliant and enterprising father; Bill, the egotistical, power-hungry, and controlling son; and his brother, Alfred, the gifted and unconventional architect. This story of a conflicted, fearful neighborhood is told against the wider background of the Civil Rights Movement and the fallout from McCarthyism. Students may know of Rosa Parks and Ruby Bridges and the students of Little Rock, AR. This courageous story is also one that should be heard.—Jackie Gropman, formerly at Fairfax County Public Library System, Fairfax, VA Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.8.All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis, by Bethany McLean As soon as the financial crisis erupted, the finger-pointing began. Should the blame fall on Wall Street, Main Street, or Pennsylvania Avenue? On greedy traders, misguided regulators, sleazy subprime companies, cowardly legislators, or clueless home buyers? According to Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera, two of Americas most acclaimed business journalists, the real answer is all of the above-and more. Many devils helped bring hell to the economy. And the full story, in all of its complexity and detail, is like the legend of the blind men and the elephant. Almost everyone has missed the big picture. Almost no one has put all the pieces together.
  3. All the Devils Are Here goes back several decades to weave the hidden historyof the financial crisis in a way no previous book has done. It explores themotivations of everyone from famous CEOs, cabinet secretaries, andpoliticians to anonymous lenders, borrowers, analysts, and Wall Street traders.It delves into the powerful American mythology of homeownership. And itproves that the crisis ultimately wasnt about finance at all; it was abouthuman nature.Among the devils youll meet in vivid detail:• Angelo Mozilo, the CEO of Countrywide, who dreamed of spreadinghomeownership to the masses, only to succumb to the peer pressure-and theoutsized profits-of the sleaziest subprime lending.• Roland Arnall, a respected philanthropist and diplomat, who made hisfortune building Ameriquest, a subprime lending empire that relied onblatantly deceptive lending practices.• Hank Greenberg, who built AIG into a Rube Goldberg contraption with anundeserved triple-A rating, and who ran it so tightly that he was the only onewho knew where all the bodies were buried.• Stan ONeal of Merrill Lynch, aloof and suspicious, who suffered from"Goldman envy" and drove a proud old firm into the ground by promotingcronies and pushing out his smartest lieutenants.• Lloyd Blankfein, who helped turn Goldman Sachs from a culture thatfamously put clients first to one that made clients secondary to its own bottomline.• Franklin Raines of Fannie Mae, who (like his predecessors) bulliedregulators into submission and let his firm drift away from its original, noblemission.• Brian Clarkson of Moodys, who aggressively pushed to increase his ratingagencys market share and stock price, at the cost of its integrity.• Alan Greenspan, the legendary maestro of the Federal Reserve, who ignoredthe evidence of a growing housing bubble and turned a blind eye to thelending practices that ultimately brought down Wall Street-and inflictedenormous pain on the country.Just as McLeans The Smartest Guys in the Room was hailed as the best Enronbook on a crowded shelf, so will All the Devils Are Here be remembered forfinally making sense of the meltdown and its consequences.
  4. Amazon.Com Review9. Gold and Spices, The Rise of Commerce in the Middle Ages, Jean Favier and Caroline Higgitt Editorial Reviews From Library Journal Favier (The World of Chartres, LJ 4/1/90), a medieval historian, examines Europes transformation from a feudal economy to a nascent form of capitalism. He details the technological advances in shipbuilding and the formation of large trading companies that made possible the success of merchant entrepreneurs at the center of this story. These developments led to an expansion in intellectual horizons as well. People became less bound to an agricultural economy and were introduced to a range of exotic products, which later helped to stimulate the Age of Discovery. Forms of speculation appeared and reappeared: loans to rulers, leased monopolies, buying on credit, fixed exchange rates, etc. The merchant entrepreneurs became major players in European politics, and the owners of shipping fleets and banks produced descendants who, like the Medici, could become secular rulers or even popes. This work should appeal to interested lay readers as well as to students and scholars. Highly recommended for academic and large public libraries.? Robert Andrews, Duluth P.L., MN Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Kirkus Reviews A painstakingly detailed account of the development of capitalist institutions and practices in Europe from the 11th to the 15th centuries by a French historian. Faviers story is in many ways a heroic one. He praises those who in any period are determined to extend the limits of what is imaginable. This would seem to be his view of the great medieval trading families of Europe, who over the course of several centuries transformed themselves from, as he puts it, ``dusty-footed merchants to a dominant economic and political force. At the same time, there is little that is heroic here; after all, the driving force for most of the merchants was simply to make the most profit with the least risk. To do so they had to be willing to confront, or manipulate, or coopt, both religious and secular authorities. New ways of doing business had to be imagined; new methods of exchange, accounting, payment, and raising capital had to be devised. If at the end of the 15th century the capitalist class, as, say, Ricardo or Marx had imagined it, had not yet emerged, the tools it would use to rule and define the world were, Favier concludes, firmly in place. Faviers work is most of value in the detail he provides. This is not grand narrative, but a careful historical investigation of precisely how, for instance, the merchants of Genoa kept their accounts or of how the credit systems they devised to protect themselves from uncertain royal currency systems worked. This is not, however, a work for the faint-hearted; a whole chapter on the various types of
  5. coins in circulation in Europe, their comparative worth, and how this worth fluctuated is not everyones idea of fascinating reading. Still, with a bit of forbearance, the details do accumulate into a worthwhile tale of the origins of the modern economic world. Not for everyone, but an impressive historical achievement. -- Copyright ©1998, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.10. High Financier, The Lives and Time of Siegmund Warburg , by Niall Ferguson This is a fabulous history of post WWII England, and the decline of their manufacturing base. Everyone should read every book ever written by Niall Ferguson. From Publishers Weekly Siegmund Warburg (1902–1982), scion of a Jewish banking dynasty, fled Nazi Germany to London, where he became a leading banker and an informal economic adviser to prime ministers—but his importance doesnt shine through this unfocused biography. Financial historian Ferguson (The Ascent of Money) styles him a financial innovator (he engineered Britains first hostile takeover), a pioneer of European economic integration (he helped invent the Eurobond), a prophet of globalization, a paragon of fiscal rectitude whose principles could have helped us avoid the current economic mess, and a deep thinker about international affairs. Unfortunately, Ferguson doesnt make a compelling argument for his subjects significance. Laymen will find his sketchy treatment of Warburgs feats of high finance rather opaque and his case for Warburg the humanist and intellectual weak (and undermined by his subjects obsession with handwriting analysis). Ferguson uses Warburgs life as a window onto European unification and Britains postwar economic malaise, but his account, which is constantly distracted by deal making and office politics at Warburgs banking partnership, is too unsystematic to do these topics justice. The view from Warburgs lofty perch doesnt make for a discerning perspective on the world around him. (July) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From Booklist No longer the banking force it formerly was, the Warburg name belongs to historians now. Ron Chernow chronicled the clan in The Warburgs (1993), and here the notable economic historian Ferguson (The Ascent of Money, 2008) depicts Siegmund Warburg (1902–82), who in his prime was the most important and influential member of the family. Verbose for someone trained in accountancy, Warburg amassed written opinions about virtually everything, furnishing Ferguson with an abundance of source material that he synthesizes with a practiced hand. Throughout his life, Warburg was never passionately interested in money. His early aspiration for an academic or political career was thwarted by the Nazi ascendance in his native Germany. Warburg immigrated to London, where, from the platform of his reestablished banking
  6. business, he involved himself in intelligence during WWII and in proffering advice to Labour Party politicians afterward. Sketching in the bibliophilic Warburgs intellectual interests, Fergusons comprehensive biography ably integrates the private, public, financial, and philosophical facets of Siegmund Warburgs character. --Gilbert Taylor http://www.amazon.com/High-Financier-Lives-Siegmund Warburg/dp/159420246X/ref=sr_1_1? ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1294529614&sr=1-111. The Poisoner’s Handbook, Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, by Deborah Blum12. A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail, by Bill Bryson Amazon.com Review Your initial reaction to Bill Brysons reading of A Walk in the Woods may well be "Egads! What a bore!" But by sentence three or four, his clearly articulated, slightly adenoidal, British/American-accented speech pattern begins to grow on you and becomes quite engaging. You immediately get a hint of the humor that lies ahead, such as one of the innumerable reasons he longed to walk as many of the 2,100 miles of the Appalachian Trail as he could. "It would get me fit after years of waddlesome sloth" is delivered with glorious deadpan flair. By the time our storyteller recounts his trip to the Dartmouth Co-op, suffering serious sticker shock over equipment prices, youll be hooked. When Bryson speaks for the many Americans he encounters along the way--in various shops, restaurants, airports, and along the trail--he launches into his American accent, which is whiny and full of hard rs. And his southern intonations are a hoot. Hes even got a special voice used exclusively when speaking for his somewhat surprising trail partner, Katz. In the 25 years since their school days together, Katz has put on quite a bit of weight. In fact, "he brought to mind Orson Welles after a very bad night. He was limping a little and breathing harder than one ought to after a walk of 20 yards." Katz often speaks in monosyllables, and Bryson brings his limited vocabulary humorously to life. One of Katzs more memorable utterings is "flung," as in flung most of his provisions over the cliff because they were too heavy to carry any farther. The author has thoroughly researched the history and the making of the Appalachian Trail. Bryson describes the destruction of many parts of the forest and warns of the continuing perils (both natural and man-made) the Trail faces. He speaks of the natural beauty and splendor as he and Katz pass
  7. through, and he recalls clearly the serious dangers the two face during their time together on the trail. So, A Walk in the Woods is not simply an out-of- shape, middle-aged mans desire to prove that he can still accomplish a major physical task; its also a plea for the conservation of Americas last wilderness. Brysons telling is a knee-slapping, laugh-out-loud funny trek through the woods, with a touch of science and history thrown in for good measure. (Running time: 360 minutes, four cassettes) --Colleen Preston --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition. From Publishers Weekly Returning to the U.S. after 20 years in England, Iowa native Bryson decided to reconnect with his mother country by hiking the length of the 2100-mile Appalachian Trail. Awed by merely the camping section of his local sporting goods store, he nevertheless plunges into the wilderness and emerges with a consistently comical account of a neophyte woodsman learning hard lessons about self-reliance. Bryson (The Lost Continent) carries himself in an irresistibly bewildered manner, accepting each new calamity with wonder and hilarity. He reviews the characters of the AT (as the trail is called), from a pack of incompetent Boy Scouts to a perpetually lost geezer named Chicken John. Most amusing is his cranky, crude and inestimable companion, Katz, a reformed substance abuser who once had single-handedly "become, in effect, Iowas drug culture." The uneasy but always entertaining relationship between Bryson and Katz keeps their walk interesting, even during the flat stretches. Bryson completes the trail as planned, and he records the misadventure with insight and elegance. He is a popular author in Britain and his impeccably graceful and witty style deserves a large American audience as well. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.13. In A Sunburned Country, by Bill Bryson Amazon.com Review Bill Bryson follows his Appalachian amble, A Walk in the Woods, with the story of his exploits in Australia, where A-bombs go off unnoticed, prime ministers disappear into the surf, and cheery citizens coexist with the worlds deadliest creatures: toxic caterpillars, aggressive seashells, crocodiles, sharks, snakes, and the deadliest of them all, the dreaded box jellyfish. And thats just the beginning, as Bryson treks through sunbaked deserts and up endless coastlines, crisscrossing the "under-discovered" Down Under in search of all things interesting. Bryson, who could make a pile of dirt compelling--and yes, Australia is mostly dirt--finds no shortage of curiosities. When he isnt dodging Portuguese man-of-wars or considering the virtues of the remarkable platypus, he visits southwest Gippsland, home of the worlds largest earthworms (up to
  8. 12 feet in length). He discovers that Australia, which began nationhood as a prison, contains the longest straight stretch of railroad track in the world (297 miles), as well as the worlds largest monolith (the majestic Uluru) and largest living thing (the Great Barrier Reef). He finds ridiculous place names: "Mullumbimby Ewylamartup, Jiggalong, and the supremely satisfying Tittybong," and manages to catch a cricket game on the radio, which is like listening to two men sitting in a rowboat on a large, placid lake on a day when the fish arent biting; its like having a nap without losing consciousness. It actually helps not to know quite whats going on. In such a rarefied world of contentment and inactivity, comprehension would become a distraction. "You see," Bryson observes, "Australia is an interesting place. It truly is. And that really is all Im saying." Of course, Bryson--who is as much a travel writer here as a humorist, naturalist, and historian--says much more, and does so with generous amounts of wit and hilarity. Australia may be "mostly empty and a long way away," but its a little closer now. --Rob McDonald --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Publishers Weekly With the Olympics approaching, books on Australia abound. Still, Brysons lively take is a welcome recess from packaged, staid guides. The author of A Walk in the Woods draws readers in campfire-style, relating wacky anecdotes and random facts gathered on multiple trips down under, all the while lightening the statistics with infusions of whimsical humor. Arranged loosely by region, the book bounces between Canberra and Melbourne, the Outback and the Gold Coast, showing Bryson alone and with partners in tow. His unrelenting insistence that Australia is the most dangerous place on earth ("If you are not stung or pronged to death in some unexpected manner, you may be fatally chomped by sharks or crocodiles, or carried helplessly out to sea by irresistible currents, or left to stagger to an unhappy death in the baking outback") spins off dozens of tales involving jellyfish, spiders and the worlds 10 most poisonous snakes. Pitfalls aside, Bryson revels in the beauty of this country, home to ravishing beaches and countless unique species ("80% of all that lives in Australia, plant and animal, lives nowhere else"). He glorifies the country, alternating between awe, reverence and fear, and he expresses these sentiments with frankness and candor, via truly funny prose and a conversational pace that is at once unhurried and captivating. Peppered with seemingly irrelevant (albeit amusing) yarns, this work is a delight to read, whether or not a trip to the continent is planned. First serial to Outside magazine; BOMC selection. (June) Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.14. A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson Amazon.com Review
  9. From primordial nothingness to this very moment, A Short History of NearlyEverything reports what happened and how humans figured it out. Toaccomplish this daunting literary task, Bill Bryson uses hundreds of sources,from popular science books to interviews with luminaries in various fields.His aim is to help people like him, who rejected stale school textbooks anddry explanations, to appreciate how we have used science to understand thesmallest particles and the unimaginably vast expanses of space. With hisdistinctive prose style and wit, Bryson succeeds admirably. Though A ShortHistory clocks in at a daunting 500-plus pages and covers the same material asevery science book before it, it reads something like a particularly detailednovel (albeit without a plot). Each longish chapter is devoted to a topic likethe age of our planet or how cells work, and these chapters are grouped intolarger sections such as "The Size of the Earth" and "Life Itself." Bryson chatswith experts like Richard Fortey (author of Life and Trilobite) and theseinterviews are charming. But its when Bryson dives into some of sciencesbest and most embarrassing fights--Cope vs. Marsh, Conway Morris vs.Gould--that he finds literary gold. --Therese Littleton --This text refers to theHardcover edition.From Publishers WeeklyAs the title suggests, bestselling author Bryson (In a Sunburned Country) setsout to put his irrepressible stamp on all things under the sun. As he states atthe outset, this is a book about life, the universe and everything, from the BigBang to the ascendancy of Homo sapiens. "This is a book about how ithappened," the author writes. "In particular how we went from there beingnothing at all to there being something, and then how a little of that somethingturned into us, and also what happened in between and since." What follows isa brick of a volume summarizing moments both great and curious in thehistory of science, covering already well-trod territory in the fields ofcosmology, astronomy, paleontology, geology, chemistry, physics and so on.Bryson relies on some of the best material in the history of science to havecome out in recent years. This is great for Bryson fans, who can encounter thismaterial in its barest essence with the bonus of having it served up in Brysonsdistinctive voice. But readers in the field will already have studied thisinformation more in-depth in the originals and may find themselvesquestioning the point of a breakneck tour of the sciences that contributesnothing novel. Nevertheless, to read Bryson is to travel with a memoiristgifted with wry observation and keen insight that shed new light on things wemistake for commonplace. To accompany the author as he travels with thelikes of Charles Darwin on the Beagle, Albert Einstein or Isaac Newton is atrip worth taking for most readers.Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to theHardcover edition.
  10. 15.At Home: A Short History of Private Life, by Bill Bryson Amazon.com Review: Amazon Best Books of the Month, October 2010: Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything) turns his attention from science to society in his authoritative history of domesticity, At Home: A Short History of Private Life. While walking through his own home, a former Church of England rectory built in the 19th century, Bryson reconstructs the fascinating history of the household, room by room. With waggish humor and a knack for unearthing the extraordinary stories behind the seemingly commonplace, he examines how everyday items--things like ice, cookbooks, glass windows, and salt and pepper--transformed the way people lived, and how houses evolved around these new commodities. "Houses are really quite odd things," Bryson writes, and, luckily for us, he is a writer who thrives on oddities. He gracefully draws connections between an eclectic array of events that have affected home life, covering everything from the relationship between cholera outbreaks and modern landscaping, to toxic makeup, highly flammable hoopskirts, and other unexpected hazards of fashion. Fans of Brysons travel writing will find plenty to love here; his keen eye for detail and delightfully wry wit emerge in the most unlikely places, making At Home an engrossing journey through history, without ever leaving the house. --Lynette Mong From Publishers Weekly: Starred Review. Bryson (A Short History of Everything) takes readers on a tour of his house, a rural English parsonage, and finds it crammed with 10,000 years of fascinating historical bric-a-brac. Each room becomes a starting point for a free-ranging discussion of rarely noticed but foundational aspects of social life. A visit to the kitchen prompts disquisitions on food adulteration and gluttony; a peek into the bedroom reveals nutty sex nostrums and the horrors of premodern surgery; in the study we find rats and locusts; a stop in the scullery illuminates the put-upon lives of servants. Bryson follows his inquisitiveness wherever it goes, from Darwinian evolution to the invention of the lawnmower, while savoring eccentric characters and untoward events (like Queen Elizabeth Is pilfering of a subjects silverware). There are many guilty pleasures, from Brysons droll prose--"What really turned the Victorians to bathing, however, was the realization that it could be gloriously punishing"--to the many tantalizing glimpses behind closed doors at aristocratic English country houses. In demonstrating how everything we take for granted, from comfortable furniture to smoke-free air, went from unimaginable luxury to humdrum routine, Bryson shows us how odd and improbable our own lives really are. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  11. 16. Shrimp: The Endless Quest for Pink Gold, by Jack Rudloe and Anne Rudloe It’s a common theme: a venerable American way of life is threatened by its own success. Local practitioners face cheap competition from other countries. Modern technologies make possible shortcuts that could ultimately spell disaster. We could be talking about virtually anything, but right now we’re talking about shrimp. This book, written by a veteran nature writer and a marine biologist explores the the past, present, and (possible) future of the shrimping industry. Shrimping dates back as far as 600 BCE; the modern shrimping industry began early in the twentieth century, when—no surprise here—technological advances enabled shrimpers to bring in mass quantities. But, as with any similar industry, shrimping is now in decline, with shrimpers facing stiff competition from companies shipping farmed shrimp to the U.S. from overseas. And, as with many similar industries, its survival in the future depends on a chancy mixture of government intervention, commercial concessions, and scientific breakthroughs. Think of the book as a small-scale reflection of a much larger reality. --David Pitt17.The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean, by Susan Casey Casey, O magazine editor-in-chief, travels across the world and into the past to confront the largest waves the oceans have to offer. This dangerous water includes rogue waves south of Africa, storm-born giants near Hawaii, and the biggest wave ever recorded, a 1,740 foot-high wall of wave (taller than one and a third Empire State Buildings) that blasted the Alaska coastline in 1958. Casey follows big-wave surfers in their often suicidal attempts to tackle monsters made of H2O, and also interviews scientists exploring the danger that global warning will bring us more and larger waves. Casey writes compellingly of the threat and beauty of the ocean at its most dangerous. We get vivid historical reconstructions and her firsthand account of being on a jet- ski watching surfers risk their lives. Casey also smoothly translates the science of her subject into engaging prose. This book will fascinate anyone who has even the slightest interest in the oceans that surround us. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From Bookmarks Magazine: Part science lesson and part adrenaline rush, The Wave is an intense thrill ride that manages to take a broad look at oversized, potentially devastating waves. The critics praised Caseys eloquent writing and jaw-droppingly vivid descriptions of chasing--or trying desperately to steer clear of--these aquatic behemoths. Although the Los Angeles Times craved more technical information, and the New York Times Book Review considered the combination of science and surfing a bit odd, most critics brushed such concerns aside. Caseys entertaining and enlightening
  12. exploration of the worlds giant waves will leave readers with "a healthy respect for the power of these waves" (Los Angeles Times) and a chilling sense of how little we truly know about the oceans that surround us.18.Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America, by Matt Taibbi The dramatic story behind the most audacious power grab in American history The financial crisis that exploded in 2008 isn’t past but prologue. The stunning rise, fall, and rescue of Wall Street in the bubble-and-bailout era was the coming-out party for the network of looters who sit at the nexus of American political and economic power. The grifter class—made up of the largest players in the financial industry and the politicians who do their bidding—has been growing in power for a generation, transferring wealth upward through increasingly complex financial mechanisms and political maneuvers. The crisis was only one terrifying manifestation of how they’ve hijacked America’s political and economic life. Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi here unravels the whole fiendish story, digging beyond the headlines to get into the deeper roots and wider implications of the rise of the grifters. He traces the movement’s origins to the cult of Ayn Rand and her most influential—and possibly weirdest—acolyte, Alan Greenspan, and offers fresh reporting on the backroom deals that decided the winners and losers in the government bailouts. He uncovers the hidden commodities bubble that transferred billions of dollars to Wall Street while creating food shortages around the world, and he shows how finance dominates politics, from the story of investment bankers auctioning off America’s infrastructure to an inside account of the high-stakes battle for health-care reform—a battle the true reformers lost. Finally, he tells the story of Goldman Sachs, the “vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity.” Taibbi has combined deep sources, trailblazing reportage, and provocative analysis to create the most lucid, emotionally galvanizing, and scathingly funny account yet written of the ongoing political and financial crisis in America. This is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the labyrinthine inner workings of politics and finance in this country, and the profound consequences for us all.19.When I Stop Talking, Youll Know Im Dead: Useful Stories from a Persuasive Man, by Jerry Weintraub
  13. Hollywood power player Weintraub, now 72, is always in control and goes to great lengths to prove it: besides having managed musical legends like Presley, Sinatra and John Denver ("I cooked him from scratch"), Weintraub once closed a deal by faking a heart attack, and won the respect of one of Chicagos most powerful men, Arthur Wirtz, when he cursed Wirtz out for making him wait (Wirtz would go on to become one of Weintraubs mentors). Weintraubs also produced plays, TV shows, movies (from Nashville to the Oceans 11 franchise), and more, summing up his talent simply: "When I believe in something, its going to get done." Edgy and honest but refreshingly spare in his criticism of stars, colleagues and family, Weintraub can be forgiven for glossing over speed bumps in his career (one failed business lost $30 million before it closed in the mid-80s) and occasionally showing his age with wandering rumination. As Weintraub repeatedly states, he is not a star, which perhaps that explains the disappointing omission of photos. Still, with a bold voice, a storied career, and a cast of superstars, his memoir makes a rousing insider tour of some five decades in the entertainment industry.20. The Money Culture, by Michael Lewis Lewis wrote a very funny and trenchant book about life as a junior bond trader on Wall Street in the mid-1980s and called it Liars Poker ( LJ 9/1/89). In this new book, he revisits familiar ground. In essays and pieces that originally appeared in magazines and newspapers, he strolls down Wall Street and takes aim at such targets as Michael Milken, the RJR Nabisco takeover, Louis Rukeyser, the Savings & Loan crisis, the Japanese, etc., and dissects them. There is not much in the way of true revelation here, but, with Lewiss puckish humor and inimitable writing style, the stories are entertaining and thought- provoking. And he proves that "the raw itch for money is still with us as surely as ever . . . and the money on Wall Street is better than elsewhere." This should be a big hit with the readers of his previous book. For all popular nonfiction collections. - Richard Drezen, Merrill Lynch Lib., New York21.FIASCO, Blood in the Water on Wall Street, The Inside Story of a Wall Street Trader, by Frank Partnoy FIASCO is the shocking story of one mans education in the jungles of Wall Street. As a young derivatives salesman at Morgan Stanley, Frank Partnoy learned to buy and sell billions of dollars worth of securities that were so complex many traders themselves didnt understand them. In his behind-the- scenes look at the trading floor and the offices of one of the worlds top investment firms, Partnoy recounts the macho attitudes and fiercely competitive ploys of his office mates. And he takes us to the annual drunken
  14. skeet-shooting competition, FIASCO, where he and his colleagues sharpen the killer instincts they are encouraged to use against their competitiors, their clients, and each other. FIASCO is the first book to take on the derivatves trading industry--the most highly charged and risky sector of the stock market. More importantly, it is a blistering indictment of the largely unregulated market in derivatives and serves as a warning to unwary investors about real fiascos, which have cost billions of dollars.22. The Monster: How a Gang of Predatory Lenders and Wall Street Bankers Fleeced America--and Spawned a Global Crisis, by Michael W. Hudson Hudson, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who now covers business and finance for the nonprofit Center for Public Integrity, delivers a chilling account of the subprime-loan scandal, which nearly brought down the U.S. and global economies. Starting at ground zero of the scandal—Orange County, California (“Con men hate snow,” one Wall Street Journal reporter put it)—Hudson runs his exposé through its principal players: big-time lenders like Roland Arnall and Russ and Becky Jedinak, juiced-up salespeople who worked for such dubious lenders, Wall Street brokerage houses that supercharged the loans, politicians who weakened once-tough lending laws, and finally, most tragically, the victims themselves. As appalling as it is informative, Hudson’s tale, which hasn’t ended by a long shot, should find a large readership. --Alan Moores23. Strange Justice, the Selling of Clarence Thomas, by Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson24. Seeds of Terror, by Gretchen Peters There is no way to stop a source of money that is said to be bigger than the textile industry worldwide.25. King of the Court, Bill Russell and the Basketball Revolution, by Aram Goudsouzian,26. Oliver Wiswell, by Kenneth Roberts The second of Robertss epic novels of the American Revolution, Rabble in Arms was hailed by one critic as the greatest historical novel written about America upon its publication in 1933. Love, treachery, ambition, and idealism motivate an unforgettable cast of characters in a magnificent novel renowned
  15. not only for the beauty and horror of its story but also for its historical accuracy.27. Getting It Wrong: Ten of the Greatest Misreported Stories in American Journalism, by W. Joseph Campbell Did the Washington Post bring down Richard Nixon by reporting on the Watergate scandal? Did a cryptic remark by Walter Cronkite effectively end the Vietnam War? Did William Randolph Hearst vow to "furnish the war" in the 1898 conflict with Spain? In Getting It Wrong, W. Joseph Campbell addresses and dismantles these and other prominent media-driven myths-- stories about or by the news media that are widely believed but which, on close examination, prove apocryphal. In a fascinating exploration of these and other cases--including the supposedly outstanding coverage of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina--Campbell describes how myths like these can feed stereotypes, deflect blame from policymakers, and overstate the power and influence of the news media.28. The Disappearing Spoon and Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements, by Sam Kean Science magazine reporter Kean views the periodic table as one of the great achievements of humankind, "an anthropological marvel," full of stories about our connection with the physical world. Funny, even chilling tales are associated with each element, and Kean relates many. The title refers to gallium (Ga, 31), which melts at 84ËšF, prompting a practical joke among "chemical cognoscenti": shape gallium into spoons, "serve them with tea, and watch as your guests recoil when their Earl Grey ˜eats™ their utensils." Along with Dmitri Mendeleyev, the father of the periodic table, Kean is in his element as he presents a parade of entertaining anecdotes about scientists (mad and otherwise) while covering such topics as thallium (Tl, 81) poisoning, the invention of the silicon (Si, 14) transistor, and how the ruthenium (Ru, 44) fountain pen point made million for the Parker company. With a constant flow of fun facts bubbling to the surface, Kean writes with wit, flair, and authority in a debut that will delight even general readers.29. Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime, by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin Even before the book was out, its juiciest bits were everywhere: Sarah Palin was serene when chosen for V.P. because it was “God’s plan.” Hillary didn’t know if she could control Bill (duh). Elizabeth Edwards was a shrew, not a saint. Overall, the men from the campaign garner less attention in these anecdote wars than the women and tend to come off better—but only just: Obama, the authors note, can be conceited and windy; McCain was disengaged to the point of recklessness; and John Edwards is a cheating, egotistical blowhard. But, hey, that’s politics, and it’s obvious that authors
  16. Heilemann (New York Magazine) and Halperin (Time) worked their sources well—all 200 of them. Some (including the sources themselves) will have trouble with the book’s use of quotes (or lack thereof). The interviews, according to the authors, were conducted “on deep background,” and dialogue was “reconstructed extensively” and with “extreme care.” Sometimes the source of a quote is clear, as when the book gets inside someone’s head, but not always. Many of the book’s events were covered heavily at the time (Hillary’s presumed juggernaut; Michelle Obama’s initial hostility to her husband’s candidacy), but some of what this volume delivers is totally behind- the-scenes and genuinely jaw-dropping, including the revelation that senators ostensibly for Clinton (New York’s Chuck Schumer) pushed hard for Obama. Another? The McCain camp found Sarah Palin by doing computer searches of female Republican officeholders. A sometimes superficial but intensely readable account of a landmark campaign30. The Story of Sushi, by Trevor Corson: Ive been eating it all wrong!! Trevor’s second book, The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw Fish and Rice (originally titled The Zen of Fish in hardcover), was selected as an Editors’ Choice by the New York Times Book Review; it also won “Best American Food Literature Book” of 2007 in the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards and was selected as a Best Food Book of the Year by Zagat. The book led to Trevor becoming the only “Sushi Concierge” in the United States—a role that he performs with regular events in several cities—and an occasional guest judge on Food Network TV’s hit show Iron Chef America.31. Four Fish: the Future of the Last Wild Food, by Paul Greenberg: Salmon, Bass, Cod, and Tuna From Publishers Weekly: In this unusually entertaining and nuanced investigation into global fisheries, New York Times seafood writer Greenberg examines our historical relationship with wild fish. In the early 2000s, Greenberg, reviving his childhood fishing habit, discovered that four fish-- salmon, tuna, bass, and cod--"dominate the modern seafood market" and that "each is an archive of a particular, epochal shift": e.g., cod, fished farther offshore, "herald the era of industrial fishing"; and tuna, "the stateless fish, difficult to regulate and subject to the last great gold rush of wild food... challeng us to reevaluate whether fish are at their root expendable seafood or wildlife desperately in need of our compassion." He found that as wild fisheries are overexploited, prospective fish farmers are likely to ignore practical criteria for domestication--hardiness, freely breeding, and needing minimal care--instead picking traditionally eaten wild-caught species like sea bass "a failure in every category." Greenberg contends that ocean life is essential to feeding a growing human population and that rational humans
  17. should seek to sustainably farm fish that can "stand up to industrial-sized husbandry" while maintaining functioning wild food systems.32. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon, by David Grann33. Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy, by Joseph E. Stiglitz the current global financial crisis carries a made-in-America label, in this forthright and incisive book, Nobel Laureate Stiglitz explains how America exported bad economics, bad policies, and bad behavior to the rest of the world, only to cobble together a haphazard and ineffective response when the markets finally seized up. Drawing on his academic expertise, his years spent shaping policy in the Clinton admin and at the World bank, and his more recent role as head of a UN commission charged with reforming the global financial system, Stiglitz outlines a way forward building on ideas that he has championed his entire career: restoring the balance between markets and government, addressing the inequalities of the global financial system and demanding more good ideas and les ideology from the economists. Freefall is an instant classic, combining an enthralling whodunit account of the current crisis with a bracing discussion of the broader economic issues at stake.34. The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story, by Michael Lewis Jim Clark: founded 3 separate $B companies. Silicon Graphics, Netscape, Healtheon...used 17 SGI computers to run his sailboat he built in the Netherlands and sailed to the Caribbean.35. Losers, by Michael Lewis, A wickedly funny and astute chronicle of the 1996 presidential campaign.36. Blind Descent: The Quest to Discover the Deepest Place on Earth , by James Tabor. Entertaining account of the expeditions of two world-renowned cavers (Bill Stone, Alexander Klimchouk) that explored deep supercaves in Mexico (Cheve, Huautla) and the Republic of Georgia (Krubera). Serious cavers will likely be familiar with many of the discoveries recounted, but armchair cavers will enjoy learning about the tremendous obstacles, common to supercaves that must be traversed in deep cave exploration (e.g., vertical shafts of up to 500 feet, crashing waterfalls, boulders, seemingly impassable sumps, extremely tight meanders). The book goes into detail about caving techniques, the special dangers of cave diving, and the development of the rebreathers that make extended exploration by cave divers possible. There are vivid descriptions of actions that proved fatal, or nearly fatal, to some cavers. There is also much
  18. interesting biographical information about both Stone and Klimchouk. The well-written, page-turning narrative is presented in a way that makes caving accessible to non-cavers. As a borderline claustophobe, I think these guys are nuts, and they should have to post a bond before they enter these caves so tax dollars dont have to be used on sending rescue teams in to haul out their decomposing asses. I switched to a Kindle to finish Paper Fortunes!37. Paper Fortunes, by Roy C Smith. Ex Goldman Sachs partner now professor at NYU. Excellent review of all modern economic history, IMHO the best single book to understand the Savings and Loan bail-out, the mortgage bubble and CDO/CDS bank bail- out, the Russian default, hedge funds, the dot-bomb busts impact, and other current economic events.38. The Devils Casino; Friendship, Betrayal, and the High-stakes Games Played Inside Lehman Brothers, by Vicky Ward, Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair. Chris Pettit, RIchard Fuld, Joe Gregory, Erin Callan39. False Economy, A Surprising Economic History of the World, by Alan Beattie. An excellent book, but it started slowly.40. 13 Bankers, The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown, by Simon Johnson and James Kwak41. Moneyball, The Art of Winning an unfair Game, by Michael Lewis. I decided to read all the books written by Michael Lewis. This is about how the Oakland As matched the NY Yankees, with 1/10th the payroll.42. The Blind Side, by Michael Lewis. I have not seen the movie and after the book, am not in a hurry to see it.43. The Laws of Disruption, Harnessing the new forces that Govern Live and Business in The Digital Age, by Larry Downes44. War at the Wall Street Journal, Inside the Struggle to Control An American Business Empire, by Sarah Ellison: Bancrofts vs. Rupert Murdoch45. The Next Hundred Million, America in 2050, by Joel Kotkin.46. Tears of Mermaids, The Secret Story of Pearls, by Stephen G. Bloom
  19. 47. Behind the Cloud, the untold story of how salesforce.com went from idea to billio-dollar company- and revolutionized an industry, by Marc Benioff, Chairman and CEO of salesforce.com and Carlye Adler48. The Big Short, by Michael Lewis; Inside the Doomsday Machine49. The Quants; How a New Breed of math Whizes Conquered Wall Street and nearly Destroyed It, by Scott Patterson, staff reporter, the Wall Street Journal; More John Meriwether , Bear Stearns50. Liars Poker, Rising Through The Wreckage on Wall Street, by Michael Lewis The classic.51. The Politician, by Andrew Young. An Insiders Account of John Edwardss Pursuit of the Presidency and the Scandal that Brought Him Down. Wow, John Edwards and Elizabeth: mean!52. Tearing Down the Walls, How Sandy Weill Fought His Way to the Top of the Financial World....and Then Nearly Lost it All, by Monica Langley53. When Genius Failed, The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management , by Roger Lowenstein: The story of John Meriwether and LTCM: Another view of Goldman, as liars , back-stabbers and double-crossers54. The Partnership, The making of Goldman Sachs, by Charles D. Ellis55. The Predators’ Ball, The Junk Bond Raiders and The Man Who Staked Them , by Connie Bruck. I’m reading this classic for the second time.56. On The Brink: Insider the Race to Stop the Collapse of the Global Financial System, by Henry Paulson I have rushed to the bookstore to buy this book, new, after reading the 3rd review, and being #34 on the Wait List at Concord Public Library. From the CEO of Goldman Sachs, who forced Microsoft to only hire the 2nd smartest guys, to Treasury Secretary. How every bank in North America almost stopped operating in late 2008. Even free-enterprise president George Bush said “We’re not kidding. Give him the money…”57. Googled, by Ken Auletta What would you do to save your newspaper, if you owned one?58. The Last Man Standing, The Ascent of Jamie Dimon and JPMorgan Chase, by Duff McDonald
  20. 59. Lords of Finance, by Liaquat Ahamed The bankers, the gold standard, France, Germany, UK and US Central Banks, currency and inflation, the Great Depression, failing banks.60. The Sellout, How Three Decades of Wall Street Greed and Government Mismanagement Destroyed the Global Financial System, by Charles Gasparino. It is amazing any of us have a credit card or checking account that works. In 2008 and 2009, most of “Wall Street” vaporized, as the investment banks and insurance firms all issued credit default swaps on tranches of their CDOs. Everyone was leveraged, and secured with real estate. When the real estate bubble went, they (Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns, Lehman Bros, AIG, CitiBank, etc.) all busted too. American business is forever, permanently, changed because of this episode. And, it’s not like this happened 50 years ago…This is an amazing book.61. Mile High Fever, by Dennis Drabelle, Silver Mines, Boom Towns and High Living on the Comstock Lode by Dennis Drabelle. I want to go back to Nevada!62. Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age, by Kurt W. Beyer63. Carl Sagan, A Life, by Keay Davidson SETI, the “21 CM line”, 1420 megacycles per second, frequency of vibrations of hydrogen gas atoms.64. The Art of the Heist, Confessions of a Master Art Thief, Rock-and-Roller, and Prodigal Son, by Myles J Connor Jr. with Jenny Siler. Loser Boston Irish art thief story.65. Plastic Fantastic, How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World, by Eugenie Samuel Reich Sputterers, plastic transistors, buckey balls, and Bell Labs66. Invented Knowledge: False History, Fake Science and Pseudo-Religions, by Ronald Fritze Atlantis, Noah’s Flood, perpetual motion, etc.
  21. 67. Postcards from Tomorrow Square, Reports from China, by James Fallows Atlantic Monthly’s national correspondent based in China since 2006.68. Jacques Cousteau, The Sea King, by Brad Matsen. I didn’t know Air Liquide helped fund the AquaLung….69. The Forever War, by Dexter Filkins In Iraq and Afghanistan…70. Harry Potter And the Sorcerer’s Stone, by JK Rowling I’ve saved this for Nora and now she’s already ready for the 3rd book.71. Uranium, War, Energy, and the Rock that Shaped the World, by Tom Zoellner Belgian Congo to Hiroshima, Utah, Areva in Africa, Paducah, 7 continents72. Cadillac Desert, The American West and Its Disappearing Water, by Marc Reisner, A Classic! Amazing! Everyone at EarthSoft, or in the environmental industry, or who lives in California or the western US, or who drinks water in the western US, should read this. Big Agriculture is some of the absolute worst “White Collar Welfare”.73. The Match King, Ivar Krueger, the Financial Genius Behind a Century of Wall Street Scandals, by Frank Partnoy The original Bernie Madoff…74. Vodka King, The Story of Pyotr Smirnov and the Upheaval of an Empire, by Linda Himelstein An ok story of Russian history from 1850 to 1920.75. The Forge of Christendom, The End of Days and the Epic Rise of the West, by Tom Holland. The history of Europe, from the fall of the Roman Empire and Christianization of the Franks, Slavs, Saxons, Pechenegs, Wends, Normans, British, Danes. Charlemagne, Constantinople, the Normans invade Sicily (1061) and 1066 (Normans invade England) and 1099 (Normans capture Jerusalem).
  22. 76. The Ascent of Money, A Financial History of The World, by Niall Ferguson77. A Colossal Failure of Common Sense, The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers, by Lawrence McDonald with Patrick Robinson78. In Fed We Trust, by David Wessel79. Hannibal, Enemy of Rome, by Leonard Cottrell Scipio Africanus, Cannae, Sophonisba, and Rome80. Scar Tissue, Anthony Kiedis with Larry Sloman My favorite band, but the guy’s a freak.81. Planet Google, One Company’s Audacious Plan to Organize Everything We Know, by Randall Stross Google Maps, YouTube, Yahoo, gMail, and more82. Election 2004: How BC04 Won and What you can Expect in the Future , by Evan Thomas and the Staff of Newsweek.83. dot.bomb, my day and nights at an internet goliath. Optimism, Lunacy, Panic, Crash, I survived to tell the tale, by j. david kuo ValueAmerica?84. Fordlandia, by Greg Grandin. Henry Ford’s rubber plantation in Amazonia….history of latex plus history of Ford85. Money, Whence it Came, Where it Went, by John Kenneth Gailbraith The classic history of money…86. Fool’s Gold, How the Bold Dream of a Small Tribe of JP Morgan was Corrupted, by Wall Street Greed and Unleashed a Catastrophe, Gillian Tett; Hedge funds, mortgage backed securities and collatoralized debt obligations…87. A Woman in Charge, by Carl Bernstein A biography of Hillary Clinton
  23. 88. Street Fighters, The Last 72 Hours of Bear Stearns, The Toughest Firm on Wall Street, by Kate Kelly89. The Big Rich, The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes , by Bryan Burrough First McCarthy, then Cullen, Richardson, Murchison, Hunt…90. The Snowball, Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, by Alice Schroeder91. Giant Bluefin, by Douglas Whynott92. Somebody, the reckless life and remarkable career of Marlon Brando, by Stefan Kanfer93. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Buying Insurance and Annuities, by Brian Breuel94. John Tyler, A Biography95. Burn Rate, How I survived the Gold Rush Years of the Internet, by Michael Wolff96. The Omnivore’s Dilemma, A Natural History of Four Meals , By Michael Pollan97. The 10,000 Year Explosion, How civilization accelerated human evolution, by Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending. If you don’t believe in evolution, then you are certainly not going to like this book. How Ashkenaz Jews got so smart, indo-european languages took over (lactose tolerance), when eyes got blue and hair red, malaria and smallpox tolerance, sickle cell anemia and dry ear wax.98. The Man Who Owns the News, Inside the Secret World of Rupert Murdoch, by Michael Wolff Less power than William Randolph Hearst, but still scary.99. The Other Half, The Life of Jacob Riis and the World of Immigrant America, by Tom Bug-Swienty, translated by Annette Buk-Swienty100.The Botany of Desire, by Michael Pollan Apples, Tulips, Marijuana, and Potatoes. And boy, do I love a good Tulip...
  24. 101.Burr, by Gore Vidal. A fake Aaron Burr bio, with G. Washington as a hopelessly incompetent pretentious king-god, and Thomas Jefferson is a lecherous old guy with several kids with his slave-mama, which of course we know now is completely true. Hilarious, and completely believable.102.The Overflowing Brain, by Torkel Klingberg About working memory, controlled attention, brain plasticity, phonological loops, visuospatial sketch pads, and…some other kind of memory, I can remember.103.Napolean in Egypt, by Paul Strathern After pages and pages of disease, hardship, fighting, and death, the most exciting thing is the discovery of the Rosetta Stone…104.Restless Genuis, about Barney Kilgore, the editor who built the WSJ, by Richard TOfel The editor who built the WSJ, another MBWA manager. He went in to the Great Depression making $180 a week and many years and several promotions later, made about the same.105.The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and why Liberals Should Too, by James K. Galbraith. John Kenneth’s son. Central Planning is not a bad thing, it’s required!106.Salt, by Mark Kurlansky107.The Puzzle Palace, by James Bamford The 2nd from the definitive expert on the NSA, whose budget is not even disclosed in the congressional budget.108.Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Expensive Mistakes Ever, by Paul B Carroll and Chunka Mui109.Island World: A History of Hawaii More about Hawaiin religion than I cared to read. Need more history, less polynesian religion here. I couldn’t finish this. In fact, I read about a third of this book and skimmed the rest.110.The Wal Mart Effect, by Charles Fishman
  25. How the World’s Most Powerful Company Really Works, and wow it’s transforming the American Economy. Vlasic Pickles and lawn chairs, Levis and you name it…111.Call Me Ted, by Ted Turner with Bill Burke The largest private landowner in the US.112.The Tapir’s Morning Bath: Solving the Mysteries of the Tropics, by Elizabeth Royte Another scientist-as-hero book by Elizabeth.113.Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It, by Elizabeth Royte114.Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash, by Elizabeth ROyte115.Tupperware Unsealed, by Brownie Wise, Earl Tupper and the Home Party Pioneers116.Tom Cruise, An Unauthorized Biography, by Andrew Morton117.Audition, a Memoir, by Barbara Walters118.My Genome, My Life, One Mans journey through his DNA, by Craig Venter119.Roman Polanski, a biography, by Christopher Sandford120.PetroPower, Putin and Russia121.Alexander Hamilton: A Life, by Willard Sterne Randall122.The Real Story of Informix Software and Phil White, by Steve W. Martin123.The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008 , by Bob Woodward124.Willie Nelson, An Epic Life, by Joe Nick Patoski125.No Excuses, Concessions of a Serial Campaigner, by Robert Shrum126.Running the Table: The Legend of Kid Delicious, the Last Great American Pool Hustler (Houghton Mifflin), by L. Jon Wertheim
  26. 127.The Secret Man, The Story of Watergate’s Deep Throat, by Bob Wooward About Mark Felt and Watergate.128.Born Standing Up, by Steve Martin129.Charlatan, America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, The Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam, by Pope Brock130.Virtuos War, Mapping the Military-industrial-Media-Entertainment Network, by James Der Derian131.109 East Palace, Robert Oppenheimer and the Secret City of Los Alamos; by Jennet Conant132.A Social History of Madness, The World through the Eyes of the Insane , by Roy Porter133.The Last Tycoons, the Secret History Lazard Freres & Co. The tale of unrestrained ambition, billion-dollar fortunes, Byzantine power struggles, and hidden scandal, by William d. Cohan134.Sin in the Second City, Madams, Ministers, Playboys, and the Battle for America’s Soul, by Karen Abbott135.Luce and his Empire, by WA Swanberg (also wrote Citizen Hearst)136.Elmer Gantry, by Sinclair Lewis, the ultimate tale of hypocrisy137.The Pixar Touch, the Making of a Company, by David Bryce138.A Man in Full, by Tom Wolfe139.Gonzo, A Biography of Hunter S. Thompson140.The Basque History of the World, by Mark Kurlansky141.Cod, A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World, by Mark Kurlansky142.Schulz and Peanuts a Biography, by David Michaelis143.Wonderful Tonight, George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and me, by Pattie Boyd and Penny Junior.144.Hooked, Pirates, Poaching and the Perfect Fish, by G. Bruce Knecht
  27. 145.The Purple Shamrock, The Hon. James Michael Curley of Boston, by Joseph F. Dinneen146.Guerrilla Marketing, by Jay Conrad Levinson147.Conservatives without Conscience, by John Dean148.The Prince of Darkness, 50 Years Reporting in Washington, by Robert D. Novak149.Boone, A Biography, by Robert Morgan150.Einstein, A Biography by Jurgen Neffe, translated by Shelley Frisch151.Filthy Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s most outrageous sexual puns, by Pauline Kiernan152.The Bluest State, How Democrats Created the Massachusetts Blueprint for American Political Disaster, by Jon Keller153.Legacy of Ashes, The History of the CIA, by Tim Weiner154.Supreme Conflict, The Inside Story of the Struggle for Control of the US Supreme Court, by Jan Crawford Greenburg155.Billy the Kid, the Endless Ride, by Michael Wallis156.This Time, This Place, My life in War, the White House, and Hollywood , by Jack Valenti157.Rickles Book, by Don Rickles w David Ritz158.The Prince, The Secret Story of the World’s Most Intriguing Royal, Prince Bandar Bin Sultan, by William Simpson159.The Mormon Way of Doing Business, Leadership and Success Through Faith and Family, by Jeff Benedict160.The Wizard of Menlo Park, How Thomas Alva Edison Invented the Modern World, by Randall Stross161.Bill & Dave, How Hewlett and Packard Built the World;s Greatest Company , by Michael Malone162.William Randolph Hearst, The Later Years 1911-1951, by Ben Brocter
  28. 163.Cheney, The Untold Story of America’s Most Powerful and Controversial Vice President, by Stephen F. Hayes164.American Spy, My secret history in the CIA, Watergate, and Beyond, by E. Howard Hunt165.Dead Certain, The Presidency of George W. Bush, by Robert Draper166.Henry Hudson, Dreams and Obsessions, The Tragic Legacy of the New World’s Least Understood Explorer, by Corey Sandler167.Spy Handler, Memoir of a KGB Officer, The True Story of the Man who Recruited Robert Hanssen and Aldrich Ames, by Victor Cherkashin with Gregory Feifer168.Catch A Wave, The Rise, Fall & Redemption of the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson, by Peter Carlin169.I’ll Sleep When I;m Dead, the Dirty Life and Time fo Warren Zevon, by Crystal Zevon170.With God on Their Side George W. Bush and the Christian Right, by Esther Kaplan171.Pushing the Limits, New Adventures in Engineering, by Herny Petroski (The Evolution of Useful Things)172.Everyman’s Eden, A History of California, by Ralph Roske173.The Man Who Tried to Buy the World, Jean-Marie Messier and Vivendi Universal, by Jo Johnson and Martine Orange174.Square Peg, Confessionals of a Citizen Senator, by Orrin Hatch175.The Lives of Norman Mailer, by Carl Rollyson176.Hubris, The inside story of spin, scandal, and the selling of the Irag War, by Michael Isikoff and David Corn177.The Commanders, by Bob Woodward178.The No Spin Zone, by Bill O’Reilly179.What a Party! My life among democrats, presidents, candidates, donors, activists, alligators, and other wild animals, by Terry McAuliffe
  29. 180.Supreme Discomfort, The divided Soul of Clarence Thomas, by Kevin Merida and Michael Fletcher181.The Storm: What went wrong and why during hurricane Katrina, the inside story from one Louisiana Scientist Ivor Van Heerden and Mike Bryan (See: Rising Tide, the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and How it Changed America by John Barry)182.Guns Germs and Steel, The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond183.Ghost Hunters: William James and the search for scientific proof of life after death, by Deborah Blum184.Moral Minority, Our Skeptical Founding Fathers, by Brooke Allen185.In Can Happen Here, Authoritarian Peril in the Age of Bush, by Joe Conason186.Letter to a Christian Nation, by Sam Harris187.In Defense of The Religious Right, by Patrick Hynes188.The Republican War on Science, by Chris Mooney189.The Old Iron Road An Epic of Rails, Roads, and the Urge to go West, by David Bain (author of Empire Express)190.Computerworld191.Johnny Cash, The Biography, by Michael Streissguth192.I Was There When It Happened, My Life With Johnny Cash, by Marshall Grant with Chris Zar193.The President’s Counselor, The Rise to Power of Alberto Gonzalez, by Bill Minutaglio194.The Candidate, Behind John Kerry’s remarkable run for the White House, by Paul Alexander195.Soldier, The Life of Colin Power, by Karen DeYoung196.Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfelt cut out the State Dept and NSC as they pushed George Bush into war with Irag. Totally usurped power….
  30. 197.The Brown Bros and the Slave Trade, and the story of Rhode Island in the Revolutionary War Connects a lot of dots about the causes of the Revolutionary War. These were the first of the industry-military complex that too late Eisenhower warned us about. They made a huge profit during the war, and then didn’t want to pay a penny of the bill (taxes).198.Work Hard, Study and Stay out of Politics, by James Baker III According to many, Baker was the brains behind Reagan and Bush.199.1776 George Washington lost every darn battle in here until the very end, in Trenton and NJ.200.Vice About Dick Cheney201.The Republican Noise Machine: Right-Wing Media and How It Corrupts Democracy, by David Brock202.Blinded by the Right: The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative, by David Brock203.John Adams His kids didn’t see too much of him growing up, since it took weeks just to travel back and forth from Boston to Philadelphia all the time. He was in France with Ben Franklin for a long time.204.Citizen Hearst I read this book again for the 6th time. This book got me started reading biographies of newspaper publishers.205.Citizen Hughes One of the best books I’ve ever read in my life is still one of the first biographies I read in my adult life. Puts a lot in perspective. The margin of error estimating the Hughes fortune was 3X the entire Kennedy family fortune. I’ve read this book 12 times, I think.206.The Annenbergs
  31. More bio of Publishers. From Gangster to Presidential aid, in 1 generation… Almost as good as the Kennedys: from Gangster to President in 1.207.Fools Rush In, by Nina Munk About Time Warner, Steve Case and AOL, Huge egos and huge budgets.208.Plan of Attack, by Bob Woodward I think I’ve read every Bob Woodward book he’s ever written. Rumsfeld screwed it up, but it was probably an impossible task anyway.209.Cyanide Canary210.The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama211.Broken Genius, the Rise and Fall of William Shockley212.Heist, the story of Super Lobbyist Jack Abramoff, by Peter Stone

×