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Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower
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Ted 2010 Wifi in the Ivory Tower

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Presentation by Drs. Danielle Eadens & Michele Gerent at the Teacher Education Division Conference in November 2010 …

Presentation by Drs. Danielle Eadens & Michele Gerent at the Teacher Education Division Conference in November 2010

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Exceptional education teacher preparation programs have a long history of offering distance education courses to meet the need of training teachers especially for critical shortage areas within the field (Johnson, 2004; Spooner, Spooner, Alogozzine, & Jordan 1998). Over 25 years ago, courses to certify teachers to work with low incidence populations were delivered through compressed video to various sites throughout a state (Johnson, 2004). These early courses used traditional methods of instruction including readings, lectures, and projects.
  • Exceptional education teacher preparation programs have a long history of offering distance education courses to meet the need of training teachers especially for critical shortage areas within the field (Johnson, 2004; Spooner, Spooner, Alogozzine, & Jordan 1998). Over 25 years ago, courses to certify teachers to work with low incidence populations were delivered through compressed video to various sites throughout a state (Johnson, 2004). These early courses used traditional methods of instruction including readings, lectures, and projects.
  • http://it.spcollege.edu/checklist/7principles.htm


    Seven Principles of Good Practice in Education*
    1. Encourages Contact Between Students and Faculty
    Frequent student-faculty contact in and out of classes is the most important factor in student motivation and involvement. Faculty concern helps students get through rough times and keep on working. Knowing a few faculty members well enhances students' intellectual commitment and encourages them to think about their own values and future plans.
    2. Develops Reciprocity and Cooperation Among Students
    Learning is enhanced when it is more like a team effort that a solo race. Good learning, like good work, is collaborative and social, not competitive and isolated. Working with others often increases involvement in learning. Sharing one's own ideas and responding to others' reactions sharpens thinking and deepens understanding.
    3. Encourages Active Learning Learning is not a spectator sport. Students do not learn much just by sitting in classes listening to teachers, memorizing pre-packaged assignments, and spitting out answers. They must talk about what they are learning, write about it, relate it to past experiences and apply it to their daily lives. They must make what they learn part of themselves.
    4. Gives Prompt Feedback
    Knowing what you know and don't know focuses learning. Students need appropriate feedback on performance to benefit from courses. When getting started, students need help in assessing existing knowledge and competence. In classes, students need frequent opportunities to perform and receive suggestions for improvement. At various points during college, and at the end, students need chances to reflect on what they have learned, what they still need to know, and how to assess themselves.
    5. Emphasizes Time on Task
    Time plus energy equals learning. There is no substitute for time on task. Learning to use one's time well is critical for students and professionals alike. Students need help in learning effective time management. Allocating realistic amounts of time means effective learning for students and effective teaching for faculty. How an institution defines time expectations for students, faculty, administrators, and other professional staff can establish the basis of high performance for all.
    6. Communicates High Expectations
    Expect more and you will get more. High expectations are important for everyone -- for the poorly prepared, for those unwilling to exert themselves, and for the bright and well motivated. Expecting students to perform well becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy when teachers and institutions hold high expectations for themselves and make extra efforts.
    7. Respects Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning
    There are many roads to learning. People bring different talents and styles of learning to college. Brilliant students in the seminar room may be all thumbs in the lab or art studio. Students rich in hands-on experience may not do so well with theory. Students need the opportunity to show their talents and learn in ways that work for them. Then they can be pushed to learn in new ways that do not come so easily.
    Teachers and students hold the main responsibility for improving undergraduate education. But they need a lot of help. College and university leaders, state and federal officials, and accrediting associations have the power to shape an environment that is favorable to good practice in higher education.
    What qualities must this environment have?
    A strong sense of shared purposes.
    Concrete support from administrators and faculty leaders for those purposes.
    Adequate funding appropriate for the purposes.
    Policies and procedures consistent with the purposes.
    Continuing examination of how well the purposes are being achieved.
    *From " SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR GOOD PRACTICE IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION" By Arthur W. Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson
  • Applying principles of good web design will increase the effectiveness of your course content for students.
    Information is scannable using the following techniques:
    Instructions and directions stand out from the body text with the course contents, using tables, colors, or font styles
    Font sizes and styles are used appropriately to distinguish titles, subtitles, body text, etc.
    Colors are used to improve the layout of the screen (titles, important text blocks, etc.)
    White space is used to visually separate information
    Indentations and bulleted lists help to organize specific content
    Text, images, and background are contrasted for easy reading
    Images are of good quality and illustrative of ideas, directions, and other text explanations
    File issues are considered:
    File sizes are kept to acceptable standards for sending, downloading, and viewing
    Files are compatible with the software used by widest range of users or according to prescribed hardware/software requirements
    Hardware/software requirements are in accordance with previous expectations
    Copyright issues are considered
    Course ownership and copyright status are indicated
    Copyrighted information has been cleared for use in the course
    Web-based resources are effective
    Web-based resources are reliable, trustworthy, and up to date
    Resources have been chosen discriminately (i.e. avoid information overload)
    External web links are annotated for easier and more selective browsing
    External web pages are set to open in a new browser window
    All the links within the course are in working order
    Organization is clearly defined
    Page titles accurately describe the contents
    Labels, titles, and subtitles for repeated information are consistently employed throughout the course
    Information is “chunked” appropriately to allow for easy scanning
    Writing is effective
    The tone is personable and friendly
    Writing is free from errors of spelling and grammar
    Writing is neutral in terms of age, sex, racial origin, religion, etc.
    First person writing is avoided in the content pages and used only in the dynamic areas of the course (e.g. the discussion area)
     
    Adapted from Ensuring Usability for Online Courses, BCIT Learning Resources Unit
  • Transcript

    • 1. Danielle Eadens, Ph.D. & Michele Gerent, Ph.D. St. Petersburg College TeacherEducationDivision St.Louis,November2010
    • 2. Session Agenda 1. Brief History of Online Instruction in Special Education 2. Effective Best Practices in Online Teacher Education 3. Selected Tools for Teacher Educators
    • 3. Brief History  Exceptional education teacher preparation programs have a long history of offering distance education courses (Johnson, 2004; Spooner, Spooner, Alogozzine, & Jordan 1998). • These early courses used traditional methods of instruction including readings, lectures, and projects (Johnson, 2004)
    • 4. Brief History  There is a growing body of evidence to support that online courses are as effective as traditionally taught courses (Caywood & Duckett 2003) and (Smith, Smith, & Boone 2000) compared groups taking the same course either online or in a traditional face-to-face class and found no significant difference in initial and follow-up learning gains  Smith (2000) found positive advantages to online discussions over face-to-face class discussions  O’Neal, Jones, Miller, Campbell, & Pierce (2007) found that web based instruction was as effective for disseminating special education course content to pre-service teachers as traditional instruction
    • 5. Best Practices in Online Instruction: Course Design & Assessment  Clearly Outline Objectives and/or Learning Outcomes  Clearly Communicate Textbook information, Expectations, Including Deliverables and Due Dates  Apply the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Education (Chickering & Gamson):  Encourage contact between students & faculty  Develop reciprocity & cooperation among students  Encourage active learning  Emphasize time on task  Communicate high expectations  Respect diverse talents & ways of learning  Review & Address Accessibility Issues  Evaluate Student Learning Through a Variety of Methods
    • 6. Best Practices in Online Instruction: Technology  Set an Expectation for Students to Use Technology to Develop and Submit Assignments  Apply the "Six Principles of Good Course Design"  Principle 1 - Information is scannable  Principle 2 - File Issues are Considered  Principle 3 - Copyright Issues are Considered  Principle 4 - Web-based Resources are Effective  Principle 5 - Organization is Clearly Defined  Principle 6 - Writing is Effective  Use a Variety of Technologies  Check Links to Make Sure They're Functioning
    • 7. Selected Tools for Teacher Educators Streaming Video Jing/Camtasia Image-centered instruction (PPT, Softchalk) Interactive Lesson Tools (Softchalk, video interfacing)
    • 8. Streaming Video  Brief video clips to elicit emotion, show examples of methodology, etc.  Splits up material & presentation  Increases interest  Opportunity to go beyond just telling the story about the kids with special needs or your concept, but to show students  Where do I find these videos?  YouTube, TeacherTube, Vimeo, Hulu, internet search (Google: Videos)….  http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/  Make your own  Encourage student submission of clips that demonstrate concepts  E.g. Submission from one of my students on behaviorism:  She called it “Pavlov in the office”:  http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1079423/the_pavlov_altoid_theory/
    • 9. Streaming Video Example Jay Kinney, Northeast High School, “A” is for Autism
    • 10. Jing/Camtasia  Screen-capture software  Captures your screen paired with your voice (via headset or webcam microphone)  Jing: Free, maximum of 5 minute recording time  http://www.techsmith.com/jing/  Camtasia: Free for 30 days, no maximum time limit, requires site or individual license to use  http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia
    • 11. Jing Example 1 (Content)  http://www.screencast.com/t/wzfrUI2HpG
    • 12. Jing Example 2 (Directions)  http://www.screencast.com/t/ZGViZGJmNmEt
    • 13. Jing Ideas  Give directions that might be unclear  e.g. Discussion post: This is what academic discourse looks like, this is an example of a good discussion post, this is a non-example… be careful of… etc.  e.g. How to score the KTEA practice assessment  Give a student/group feedback on their assignment (especially if it is too much to write!)  Insert in a lesson to split up or explain confusing parts of a PowerPoint.
    • 14. Camtasia Ideas  Online lecture from professor or guest speaker (if you need them to voice over a PowerPoint)  Note: If you want primarily video, use a video camera instead  Opportunity to navigate through difficult concepts  Opportunity to showcase multiple things and complete a voice-over as you talk about them (this TED presentation would translate nicely into a Camtasia presentation).
    • 15. Image Centered Instruction  Why? Dale’s Cone of Experience Image from http://mitegypt.com
    • 16. Image Centered Instruction - PPT
    • 17. Image Centered Instruction - Softchalk
    • 18. Interactivity Tools: Softchalk 1 of 2
    • 19. Interactivity Tools: Softchalk 2 of 2
    • 20. Interactivity Tools: Video  Skype or ooVoo  Video conference with students, encourage students to work together in groups, record video messages for students  www.ooVoo.com/student  ooVoo how to: http://www.oovoo.com/HowToooV ooItem.aspx?pname=HowToooVoo VideoMessages  Google Video Chat  Chat within gmail: http://www.google.com/chat/video  http://www.google.com/support/chat /bin/answer.py?answer=159499
    • 21. Summary of Tools  Streaming Video (Most often free)  Jing (Free) or Camtasia (Purchase)  Concept: Image-centered instruction  PowerPoint & Softchalk  Softchalk (Purchase)  Skype, Google Video (Free), ooVoo (Free/Purchase)  Other tools that you cannot live without?
    • 22. Other Resources…  http://www.polleverywhere.com/  FDLRS resources pdf booklet: http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/ha ndouts/exploringnewterritories20 10.pdf

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