Presenter or main title…<br />Session Title or subtitle…<br />EU Screen Conference17th September 2011<br />Catherine Grout...
Who we are<br />JISC – national organisation in UK that provides services and funds innovation programmes for universities...
The Challenge<br />Knowledge Is…<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMLf5mpifNc<br />JISC Film and Sound Think Tankhttp:/...
The Think Tank<br />Why?<br />We have lots of the pieces (infrastructure, content, innovation)<br />Education can’t  work ...
Depends on your perspective<br /><ul><li>National
Regional
Institutional (university, library, museum, archive)
Collection</li></ul>What needs to happen <br /><ul><li>Still exists
People are using it
Covers its own costs
Makes money</li></ul>16/09/2011| Slide 5<br />What is Sustainability?<br />
Digital Content Boom! <br />|  Slide 6<br />
Digital Content Bust? <br />|  Slide 7<br />
JISC-Ithaka work<br /><ul><li>Very little previous research on web at the time looking at this issue
Started with Detailed case studies “under the bonnet” of digital content collections
Identified some good examples
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes/content/contentalliance/reports/businessmodelling.aspx (Strategic Content Alliance: ...
Looking at funders and government approachesGetpeople together to discuss results
Next is deep dive (what happens in a single institution – how decisions are made etc.)</li></ul>16/09/2011| Slide 8<br />S...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Business Models for Digital Content: A Perspective from UK Higher Education and the Work of the Strategic Content Alliance – Catherine Grout (JISC, UK)

1,724

Published on

Presentation by Catherine Grout about a perspective on business models for digital content from UK Higher Education and on the work of the Strategic Content Alliance at the Second EUscreen International Conference on Use and Creativity, which took place at the National Library of Sweden, Stockholm, on September 15-16, 2011.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,724
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Business Models for Digital Content: A Perspective from UK Higher Education and the Work of the Strategic Content Alliance – Catherine Grout (JISC, UK)

  1. 1. Presenter or main title…<br />Session Title or subtitle…<br />EU Screen Conference17th September 2011<br />Catherine Grout: JISC Director e-Content<br />
  2. 2. Who we are<br />JISC – national organisation in UK that provides services and funds innovation programmes for universities, further education and research<br />Strategic Content Alliance – is a cross public sector programme involving, education, national libraries, science, broadcast, arts and culture funders etc. (to design and deliver a strategy for e-content)(JISC, BL, BBC, Wellcome Trust, Arts Council)<br />16/09/2011| Slide 2<br />
  3. 3. The Challenge<br />Knowledge Is…<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMLf5mpifNc<br />JISC Film and Sound Think Tankhttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/filmandsound.aspx<br />Final Report and all outputshttp://filmandsoundthinktank.jisc.ac.uk/<br />16/09/2011| Slide 3<br />
  4. 4. The Think Tank<br />Why?<br />We have lots of the pieces (infrastructure, content, innovation)<br />Education can’t work on its own: partnership – education, broadcast, archives<br />Press pause and visit the issues<br />What did we find?<br />We need to use each others platforms… archives need the educational window.. education needs broadcast… it’s a symbiotic system (who leads)<br />Students may push ahead of educators (meeting student expectations big issue)<br />Practical barriers remain (IPR, tools, academic practice… citation etc.)<br />16/09/2011| Slide 4<br />
  5. 5. Depends on your perspective<br /><ul><li>National
  6. 6. Regional
  7. 7. Institutional (university, library, museum, archive)
  8. 8. Collection</li></ul>What needs to happen <br /><ul><li>Still exists
  9. 9. People are using it
  10. 10. Covers its own costs
  11. 11. Makes money</li></ul>16/09/2011| Slide 5<br />What is Sustainability?<br />
  12. 12. Digital Content Boom! <br />| Slide 6<br />
  13. 13. Digital Content Bust? <br />| Slide 7<br />
  14. 14. JISC-Ithaka work<br /><ul><li>Very little previous research on web at the time looking at this issue
  15. 15. Started with Detailed case studies “under the bonnet” of digital content collections
  16. 16. Identified some good examples
  17. 17. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes/content/contentalliance/reports/businessmodelling.aspx (Strategic Content Alliance: briefing papers)
  18. 18. Looking at funders and government approachesGetpeople together to discuss results
  19. 19. Next is deep dive (what happens in a single institution – how decisions are made etc.)</li></ul>16/09/2011| Slide 8<br />Strategic Content Alliance: Research into the Issue<br />
  20. 20. Some Potential Models<br />A: Centralised Investment/loans - sustained by a variety of income streams<br />B: Private sector investment in public content (eg in individual or shared library Collections/Services) <br />C: Crowd sourcing/community generated collections<br />D: Internal resource redeployment (potentially supported by national shared services)<br />E: Consortial action: (pooling resources/Shared Services/Centres of Expertise)<br />
  21. 21. A: Public Investment<br />Example: The French government have invested in the digitisation of the INA archive (France’s audio visual heritage – equivalent in some respects to BBC archive - 60 years of TV & 70 years of radio: with over 3 million hours of TV & radio.. www.ina.fr100% of content online by 2015)<br />Advantages: Mass digitisation achieved within relatively short time scale. Once content in place can be exploited in a variety of ways. Sustainability options greater given amount that exists.<br />Disadvantages: Central funding hard to make the case for in the current economic climate. Many demands upon the public purse across the UK and harder to make the case for what should be prioritised.<br />
  22. 22. 16/09/2011| Supporting education and research | Slide 11<br />B: Private Investment in Public Content<br />Example: Hathi Trust: (http://www.hathitrust.org/)<br /> To date the collections comprise - 6,250,748 total volumes ; 3,663,969 book titles; 147,527 serial titles. Members are from a variety of University Libraries (many of them in California) and also including the New York Public Library. Commercial partners include Google, and Kirtas (commercial book digitisation vendor).<br />Advantages: one way of unlocking public content, can be flexible and licensing terms and conditions can be negotiated to allow free at the point of use access to be maintained.<br />Disadvantages: Access terms may be restricted and not open. It can be difficult to make the right kind of offer to the commercial sector in order to make an investment worthwhile. Specialised research content may not be so attractive as it does not have mass market appeal and it may be more difficult to generate revenue.<br />
  23. 23. C: Crowd Sourcing/Community Collections<br />Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org).250,000 people so far have taken part in classifying galaxies. Within 24 hours of launch, the site was receiving 70,000 classifications an hour, and more than 50 million classifications were received by the project during its first year, from almost 150,000 people.<br />Oxford University Anglo Saxon Archivehttp://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jul/06/oxford-university-anglo-saxon-archive The university is asking members of the public to upload any stories, poems, writing, art or songs they have composed or heard that relate to Old English and the Anglo-Saxons to Project Woruldhord (Old English for "world-hoard"). <br />This builds on the success of the Great War Archive (http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/) and is part of the Run co co project which is looking at the best way of using crowd sourcing to develop existing or build new collections. http://projects.oucs.ox.ac.uk/runcoco/<br />
  24. 24. C: Crowd Sourcing/Community Collections<br />Advantages: engages users directly and creates a sense of ownership and interest in collections. Fulfills social mission of universities and other organisations; can generate a great deal of content very quickly with very modest investment. Can also have its own sustainability model at low cost<br />Disadvantages: will need specialist staff time and effort from official collections to get off the ground and to mediate the content; will potentially need ongoing effort and investment to sustain; may not achieve mass digitisation to scale but hard to say until more experimentation into the potential of this model has been achieved. <br />
  25. 25. D: Internal resource redeployment <br />This is looking at the day to day business of content rich institutions who would in theory like to be able to offer a much greater percentage of their resources online and have a more compelling online presence. <br />In theory a greater shift to the digital would involve re-directing staff activity and budgets away from some activities, for example support for physical collections and/or investment in physical collections towards investment in the creation or procurement of digital collections. <br />Where has this (actually) taken place??....<br />In theory this could be more viable if there are more centrally shared services to support the library eg collections management, cataloguing, archiving and preservation etc.<br />
  26. 26. D: Internal resource redeployment <br />Advantages: could be achieved at a modest or low cost. Could offer opportunities for new income streams. Could enable institutions to remain head of the game in this new era<br />Disadvantages: what stops to enable this to happen? Problematic to identify business case internally and to shift cultures and mindsets<br />Might be easier as part of a consortial approach rather than going it alone<br />
  27. 27. E: Collaborative<br />Could be: Consortial action/pooling resources/Shared Services <br />Example: JISC Digitisation Programme. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation.aspx<br />Helps to develop skills, infrastructure and expertise as well as content which then become shared resources and help to boost the overall capabilities of our sector in the shift to the digital<br />JISC also provides centralised content related services…. Licensing, resource discovery, delivery, advice etc. to support this mutual endeavour<br />Advantages: whole is greater than sum of parts, economies of scale, sharing of good practice, up-skilling (as well as content)<br />Disadvantages: ongoing business case can be more difficult to identify in current economic climate (prob others?)<br />
  28. 28. Film and Sound Archive Challenges<br />Top Three Challenges:<br />Integrating access<br />User engagement<br />Partnership and pooling resources and expertise<br />
  29. 29. Film and Sound Archive Challenges<br />Top Three Challenges:<br />Integrating access<br />User engagement<br />Partnership and pooling resources and expertise<br />
  30. 30. 16/09/2011| Supporting education and research | Slide 19<br />The Films<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TfCSe3z7zg&feature=player_embedded#!<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epgY6nHCbu8&feature=player_embedded#!<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx4Xj9zoq1M&feature=player_embedded<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×