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Living and Working in Norway in 2010, presented by EURES

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Living and Working in Norway in 2010. A presentation given at the EURES European Job Days in Lisbon on the 21st of October.

Living and Working in Norway in 2010. A presentation given at the EURES European Job Days in Lisbon on the 21st of October.

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  • Introduction
  • In Norway, the job centre, national insurance and local welfare offices are gathered in one organisation with local offices around the country – look for the logo. As EURES advisers we work with labour mobility – helping people like yourselves, giving presentations about living and working in other countries and helping employers to find candidates for vacant positions. EURES Portugal has arranged this job fair. There are 34 advisers in Norway, just under 800 in the EU and EFTA
  • Norwegian is not quite a world language. However, if you learn one language, you might say you get two for free – gaining ”access” to a linguistic region of some 18 million people. Scandinavians understand each other well.
  • Our national football coach Egil Olsen on the left. Rubber boots are not part of the national costume…
  • These are some of the norms of working life in Norway. A standard job contract is required by law to state: Start date, place and type of work, pay and pay dates, holiday, weekly work hours, probationary or trial period, and end date if any.
  • Holiday pay is accumulated. The first year of work you will have the right to four weeks of unpaid holiday, and the following year you will be able to take five weeks of paid holiday. In June most people receive their holiday pay, which is roughly equal to one month’s gross pay Most jobholders in Norway are members of a union and we generally recommend membership. The fee is tax deductible…
  • What is drawn from your salary every month – typically 36% and around 45% for high wages – includes your national insurance contribution
  • Sickness and unemployment benefit rights are accumulated, from 8 weeks of full-time work for unemployment benefit to 12 weeks for sickness benefit.
  • The child benefit is automatic unless the child is born outside of Norway. Single-parent benefits are income-support, and depend on each case. The cash benefit was introduced to give parents a choice of either sending their children to kindergarten, or caring for them at home during their early years.
  • This is the NAV frontpage and the link directly to the job vacancy search facility
  • Get out your dictionary and select category, sub category, and region Add key word(s)
  • Get out your dictionary and select category, sub category, and region Add key word(s)
  • If you have found a job in Norway, self-register and visit your nearest police station or service centre for foreign workers to obtain your registration certificate, which is also your formal residence and work permit Jobseekers will not receive a certificate, and should register when staying longer than three months
  • Oslo, Stavanger and Kirkenes in the north have Service Centres for foreign workers. These are visiting centres As soon as you arrive in any new country there are formalities to take care of as soon as you can. We have a description of these formalities available after the presentation.

Transcript

  • 1. Living and Working in Norway Nils-Erik Bjørholt/Innovation Norway Johan Wildhagen/Innovation Norway Erik Jørgensen/Innovation Norway Janne Nilsen NAV EURES NORWAY
  • 2. NAV EURES
    • Labour and Welfare Administration
      • Job Centre
      • National Insurance
      • Welfare office
    • EURopean Employment Services
    • www.nav.no
    • www.eures.no
  • 3. Geography
    • Population , 4 888 000
    • Immigrants: 500,000
      • (Poland, Pakistan, Sweden, Irak, Somalia, Germany…)
    • Length 1750 km
    • 7.th largest in Europe
    • 19 counties
    • 16 person per km2
    • Capital Oslo
      • 575,000 inhabitants
      • Bergen 252,051
    Trondheim 168,257 Stavanger 121,610 Kristiansand 79,500
  • 4.  
  • 5. Norway
    • Currency Norwegian kroner, NOK
    • Constitutional monarchy, King Harald V
    • Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg
    • Centre-Left Coalition government
    € 1 = NOK 8,30
  • 6. Characteristics
    • -30 ° to +30 ° C
    • Bright summers/Midnight Sun
    • Dark winters/Polar Night
      • Northern Lights
      • (aurora borealis)
    • Natural variety
    • Outdoor culture
    • High standard of living
    • Extensive welfare system
    • Safe working conditions
  • 7.  
  • 8. Language
    • Two official forms:
      • Standard Norwegian (bokmål)
      • New Norwegian (nynorsk)
    • Close to Swedish and Danish
    • Many regional dialects
    • Language of the Sami people
    • Norwegians speak English well
    • Most employers require Norwegian or a Scandinavian language
    • Norwegian courses held in most towns
    • Free language courses not offered
  • 9. Language Tools
    • www.migranorsk.no (web-based course)
    • www.lexin.no (dictionary)
    • www.dialang.org (language test)
    • http://steinpastein.cappelendamm.no (free online exercise book)
    • Visit your local bookstore for book/CD courses
  • 10. Cultural Matters at work
    • Flat structure in the workplace – Who is the boss?
    • Conformity/Equality/No special treatment
    • Enjoying space, keeping distance, privacy
    • Cold lunches
    • Dress code
  • 11. Dress code
  • 12. Labour Market in Norway
    • August 2010: 2,9%
    • Unemployment: 76 000
    • Vacancies: 18 500
  • 13. Labour Market II
    • Shortages:
      • Mechanical (skilled workers)
      • Engineers (seniors)
      • IT specialists
      • Health sector (doctors, nurses, assisting nurses and specialised nurses)
      • Hotel and tourism (Seasonal - chefs and waiters)
      • Sales staff
    • On longer term:
      • Employees for production of renewable energy
  • 14. Offshore Industry
    • Large competition for jobs
    • Highly skilled personnel with long experience only
    • Shortages: Petroleum engineers
    • Recruits from Mechanical Industry
  • 15. IT
    • Large activity in the late 90s
    • 2006: Increasing demand
    • Large demand for highly skilled personnel
  • 16. Health
    • Dentists: Public Sector
    • Doctors: Specialists
    • Doctors: Rural areas
    • Nurses: Specialised education
    • Assisting nurses
    • Unskilled: No demand
  • 17. Hotel and Tourism
    • Chefs
    • Waiters
    • Bartenders
    • Good language skills
    • Seasonal work
    • f.ex Ski-resort in the mountains
  • 18. Working Conditions
    • Written contract!
    • 6 months probationary period
    • Salary paid once a month
    • Employer draws tax from your monthly pay
    • 37,5 working hours per week
    • Shift workers have 35,5 hours working week.
    • Maximum 40 hours per week.
  • 19. Working Conditions
    • Holiday: 25 working days per year
    • 30 days for employees over the age of 60
    • Holiday pay normally paid out in the month of June
    • Holiday pay 12% of gross pay for trade union members
    • 10,2% for non trade union members.
    • Holiday pay is accumulated
    • The Working Environment Act: www.arbeidstilsynet.no
  • 20. Taxes
    • Working in Norway for a Norwegian employer, you pay income tax and national insurance contribution to Norway
    • Average income tax is 28%
    • National Insurance contribution 7.8%.
    • Deductions!
      • EU citizens are entitled to a deduction called “standardfradrag” in the two first years (10% or max NOK 40,000 per year)
      • House mortgage, loans/debts increase your deductions
    • Tax return submitted every year in April
  • 21. National Insurance I
    • What is covered through the National Insurance?
    • Sickness Benefit
      • 100% pay first year
      • 66% second year if still in active treatment
    • Unemployment Benefit
      • About 63% of pay for a maximum of 2 years
    • Child birth benefit
      • 12 months with 80% pay (or 10 months, 100% pay)
      • Paternity leave 10 weeks
  • 22. National Insurance II
    • What is covered through the National Insurance?
    • Old-age pension
      • Retirement age in Norway is 67 years
    • Disability benefit
    • Free hospital treatment
    • Free dental treatment for under-18s
  • 23. National Insurance III
    • What is covered through the National Insurance?
    • Child benefit
      • Ages 0 to 18: NOK 970 (€116) per month
    • Single-parent benefits
    • Cash benefit “Kontantstøtte”
      • Ages 1 to 3: Up to NOK 3657 (€435) per month.
    • You have to apply for these benefits at Nav if the child is not born in Norway.
  • 24. Salaries
    • Average monthly salary NOK 34,200 (€ 4071)
    • The 10% best paid average NOK 66,300 (€ 7893) per month
    • The 10% least paid average NOK 19,300 (€ 2300) per month
    • No minimum salaries
    • Collective (tariff) agreements by sector
    • Wage negotiations yearly (in April-May) between trade unions and Norwegian Employers’ Confederation
  • 25. COSTS
    • Food (except meat) and cloths are not so expensive.
    • Alcohol and cigarettes are very expensive.
    • Eating out in a restaurant is also expensive.
    • One beer will cost about 8 euro and a glass of wine will cost about 10 euro in a pub/restaurant. One coffee will cost about 2,50 euro
    • Cars are very expensive.
    • Petrol is also expensive, despite the fact that Norway is an oil producing country. The prices will vary from day to day. On average it costs about 1,4 euro per liter.
    • It is expensive to visit Norway as a tourist.
  • 26. What do you get for your wages?
    • Norway – 5th place in Europe for cheap food!
    • 6 hours’ work = 1 week’s supply of food
    • How Norwegians spend their salary:
      • housing, electric etc. 27%
      • public transport, car 20%
      • food & household goods 18%
      • culture, leisure 12%
    • UNDP:Norway highest score for income, life expectancy and living conditions
    • Statistics Norway – www.ssb.no
  • 27. Average Prices
    • NOK €
    • Bread, 750 g 20 2,40
    • Milk, 1l 13 1,55
    • Butter, 250 g 17 2
    • Cheese, 1 kg 78 9,30
    • Beer, 0,33 l 19 2,30
    • Coffee, 250 g 16 1,90
    • Potatoes, 1 kg 9 1,10
    • Coca Cola, 1,5 l 20 2,40
    • Beef, 1 kg 200 23,80
    • Sausage, 1 kg 100 12
    • Salmon, 1 kg 80 9,50
    • Shrimps, 1 kg 80 9,50
    30 400 Hair cut, men 8,40 70 Cigarettes, 1 pack 3 25 Bus ticket, Oslo 50 450 Hair cut, women 1,50 12,50 Chocolate, Mars 7 59 Magazine 1,80 15 Newspaper 10,70 90 Cinema ticket 20 170 CD 10,10 85 Big Mac menu, large € NOK
  • 28. Accommodation
    • Most Norwegians own their own home:
      • 90% of couples living together
      • 67% of young couples and single parents
    • Average rent for a house/apartment is NOK 6000 (€ 714) per month. Oslo and Stavanger are more expensive
    • You can get your own house with a garden for about NOK 1,500,000 to 2,500,000 (€ 180,000-300,000). Prices vary depending on location and size. Exception Oslo and Stavanger.
  • 29.  
  • 30. Jobseeking
    • 60-70% of jobs are not advertised
    • Make a Curriculum Vitae (CV) in English
    • Europass CV increasingly common
    • Use www.gulesider.no and company web sites
    • Contact employers directly
    • Use your personal network
    • Three reference persons
  • 31. Where to find jobs
    • www.nav.no (Norwegian)
    • www.nav.no/english (jobs posted in English)
    • www.eures.no
    • www.finn.no/jobb
    • www.stillinger.no
    • NAV Service Centre Phone: +47 800 33 166
      • (Mon-Fri 08:00-18:00)
    • Contact the EURES Adviser in your area
  • 32.  
  • 33. Vacancies – ledige stillinger
  • 34. CV-BASE
  • 35. Work/Residence permits
    • Norway is an EEA (not EU) member
    • EU/EEA citizens have the right to work in Norway
      • Restrictions apply for citizens of Rumania and Bulgaria
    • Jobholders (with written contract) must register:
      • https://selfservice.udi.no (Register as a new user)
      • Visit police or service centre for Registration Certificate
      • Jobseekers self-register, only when staying longer than 3 months
  • 36. Arriving in Norway
    • Service Centre for Foreign Workers
    • www.sua.no
    • Police (Politiet)
    • www.politi.no
    • Tax Office/Population Register
    • www.skatteetaten.no
    • Bank
    • NAV
    • www.nav.no
    • Child benefit
    • Family doctor
    • Call centre +47 810 33 810
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40. Erik Jørgensen/Innovation Norway Janne Nilsen – janne.nilsen@nav.no NAV EURES VESTFOLD Bem-vindo