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Learning Session 2-4 Services and Benefits For Returning Young Adult Benefits
 

Learning Session 2-4 Services and Benefits For Returning Young Adult Benefits

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Young Veterans are a growing segment of today’s jobseekers! This workshop will describe the demographics of Young Adult Veterans and their challenges. In addition, information will be provided on ...

Young Veterans are a growing segment of today’s jobseekers! This workshop will describe the demographics of Young Adult Veterans and their challenges. In addition, information will be provided on educational and training services available to young veterans as they begin to transition back into today’s challenging job market. Attendees will have an opportunity to learn about the new benefits available under the new “Post 9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance and Improvement Act.” Apprenticeship services for which young veterans may be eligible will also be highlighted.

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  • Now that we know who they are among the populations, what are some unique characteristics related to the job market
  • The younger the veteran, the higher the unemployment rate
  • For Immediate Release August 05, 2011 Fact Sheet: President Obama’s Commitment to Employing America’s Veterans
  • Gold card service
  • A series of new and continued tax credits
  • Accredited college degree program offered at a public or not-for-profit proprietary IHL A flight training course approved by the Federal Aviation Administration offered through a flight School An apprenticeship program registered with the Office of Apprenticeship (OA) & DOL A program leading to a secondary school diploma offered by a secondary school approved in the State in which it is operating . A licensure test offered by a Federal, State, or local government
  • Eligible (Veterans or Caretakers) that were prevented from using benefits will be extended for that period of time that person was prevented from using a benefit due to physical or mental disability. (Children who reach 26 can’t use benefit unless they too were caregivers) *NOAA & PHS are included 10/1/2011
  • Includes Skill Training & Title 32 when President or Secretary of Defense activates
  • Student ends course Dec 15 th – Resumes Jan 15 Housing will end & begin on the 15 th of each month. MGIB AD & SR College Fund will be paid monthly rather than in one lump sum (if applicable)
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NOAA ) US Public Health Service
  • Once Steps 1 & 2 are completed and approval has been granted, this simply entitles the dependent to use the benefit. NOTE: Steps 2a/2b are only needed if you need to extend. (See slide 21) Dependent still MUST apply for the benefit using VONAPP / VA Form 22-1990e School MUST also still verify the hours taken with the VA on 22-1999 (See VA Rep at School See Process Slide near end of this presentation
  • Log On and follow the prompts. Soldiers complete the VA Form 22-1990 Dependents complete the VA Form 22-1990e
  • Accredited college degree program offered at a public or not-for-profit proprietary IHL A flight training course approved by the Federal Aviation Administration offered through a flight School An apprenticeship program registered with the Office of Apprenticeship (OA) & DOL A program leading to a secondary school diploma offered by a secondary school approved in the State in which it is operating . A licensure test offered by a Federal, State, or local government
  • Eligible (Veterans or Caretakers) that were prevented from using benefits will be extended for that period of time that person was prevented from using a benefit due to physical or mental disability. (Children who reach 26 can’t use benefit unless they too were caregivers) *NOAA & PHS are included 10/1/2011
  • Includes Skill Training & Title 32 when President or Secretary of Defense activates
  • Student ends course Dec 15 th – Resumes Jan 15 Housing will end & begin on the 15 th of each month. MGIB AD & SR College Fund will be paid monthly rather than in one lump sum (if applicable)
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NOAA ) US Public Health Service
  • Once Steps 1 & 2 are completed and approval has been granted, this simply entitles the dependent to use the benefit. NOTE: Steps 2a/2b are only needed if you need to extend. (See slide 21) Dependent still MUST apply for the benefit using VONAPP / VA Form 22-1990e School MUST also still verify the hours taken with the VA on 22-1999 (See VA Rep at School See Process Slide near end of this presentation
  • Log On and follow the prompts. Soldiers complete the VA Form 22-1990 Dependents complete the VA Form 22-1990e

Learning Session 2-4 Services and Benefits For Returning Young Adult Benefits Learning Session 2-4 Services and Benefits For Returning Young Adult Benefits Presentation Transcript

  • Services and Benefits for Returning Young Adult Veterans
    • Jill Houser
    • Regional Director
    • U.S. Department of Labor
    • Office of Apprenticeship
    • Boston, Massachusetts
  • Demographics of Young Veterans
    • Roughly 13% of the population are veterans
  • Gulf War-era II Veterans
    • Gulf War-era II veterans served anywhere on active duty since September 2001.
    • Gulf War-era I veterans served anywhere between August 1990 and August 2001
  • 1 in 10 Gulf War – era II
  • Gulf War-era II Veterans
    •  
    • In 2010, about 2.2 million of the nation's veterans had served during Gulf War era II.
    • About 17 percent of these veterans were women , compared with 3 percent of veterans from World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam era.
    • Nearly two-thirds of all Gulf War-era II veterans were under the age of 35 .
    •  
  • Higher Unemployment Rates for those ages 18-24
    • In 2010, a large majority (82.2 percent) of Gulf War-era II veterans participated in the labor force, and their unemployment rate was 11.5 percent.
    • For those ages 18 to 24, the unemployment rate was 20.9 percent , higher than that of Gulf War-era II veterans
  • Today’s veterans face unique challenges
    • Younger veterans face highest unemployment
    • Higher Unemployment than non veterans same age and gender
    • More and more returning veterans
  • Today’s veterans face unique challenges
    • Many worked in sectors that were among the hardest hit by the recession. 
    • Post-9/11 veterans were more likely to be employed in mining, construction, manufacturing, transportation and utilities—all industries that experienced significant drops in employment during 2008-2009.  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Today’s veterans face unique challenges
    • And as we end the war in Iraq and wind down the war in Afghanistan, over one million servicemembers are projected to leave the military between 2011 and 2016.
  • Today’s veterans face unique challenges
    • Many worked in sectors that were among the hardest hit by the recession. 
    • Post-9/11 veterans were more likely to be employed in mining, construction, manufacturing, transportation and utilities—all industries that experienced significant drops in employment during 2008-2009.  
  • Some Good News
    • Solid Foundations
    • Government Assistance
  • Gulf War-era II Veterans
    • Veterans from Golf War-era II were much less likely to be high school dropouts (2 percent) than were nonveterans (14 percent).
    • About 50 percent of recent veterans had a college or associate degree, compared to 30 percent of nonveterans.
  • Gulf War-era II Veterans
    • Gulf War-era II veterans were twice as likely to work in the public sector as were nonveterans--30 percent and 15 percent, respectively.
    • About 16 percent of employed veterans of the era worked for the federal government, compared with about 2 percent of nonveterans.
  • Executive Direction
    • Presidential Call for a Career-Ready Military : The Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs will lead a new task force to develop reforms to ensure that every member of the service receives the training, education, and credentials they need to transition to the civilian workforce or to pursue higher education.
  • “ to maximize the career-readiness of all servicemembers”
    • This effort will transform the services’ approach to education, training, and credentialing for servicemembers, and bolster and standardize the counseling services that servicemembers receive prior to separating from the military. The Secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs, on behalf of the task force, will provide a report to the President by the end of the year, with recommendations.
  • Executive Direction
    • Transition to the Private Sector : The Department of Labor will establish a new initiative to deliver an enhanced career development and job search service package to transitioning veterans at their local One-Stop Career Centers.
    • The Office of Personnel Management will create a “Best Practices” Manual for the private sector to help businesses identify and hire veterans.
  • Executive Direction
    • These reforms will include the design of a “Reverse Boot Camp,” which will extend the transition period to give servicemembers more counseling and guidance and leave them career-ready.
    • Gold Card service in the One-Stop system
  • TAP through select One-Stop Career Centers.  
    • Servicemembers will be provided “Gold Cards” through the Transition Assistance Program (TAP).
    • The “Gold Card” package will include a combination of core and intensive services (skills assessment, career coaching, job search assistance) over a six-month period to jump-start their job search process and reconnect them to the civilian labor force in high-demand sectors.
  • Executive Direction
    • A Challenge to the Private Sector to Hire or Train 100,000 Unemployed Veterans or Their Spouses by the End of 2013 : The President will challenge businesses to commit to hire or provide training to unemployed veterans and military spouses. Microsoft, Lockheed Martin, Accenture, JP Morgan, AT&T and many other companies and non-profits have already risen to the challenge and announced new commitments to training or employing veterans.
  • The President will call for two new tax credits:
    • Short-term unemployed : A new credit of 40 percent of the first $6,000 of wages (up to $2,400) for employers who hire veterans who have been unemployed at least 4 weeks.
    • Long-term unemployed : A new credit of 40 percent of the first $12,000 of wages (up to $4,800) for employers who hire veterans who have been unemployed longer than 6 months.
  • Executive Direction
    • Returning Heroes and Wounded Warrior Tax Credits : A new  Returning Heroes Tax Credit  for firms that hire unemployed veterans (maximum credit of $2,400 for every short-term unemployed hire and $4,800 for every long-term unemployed hire) and a  Wounded Warriors Tax Credit  that will increase the existing tax credit for firms that hire veterans with service-connected disabilities who have been unemployed long-term (maximum credit of $9,600 per veteran) .
  • The  Wounded Warrior Tax Credit  will double the existing tax credit for long-term unemployed veterans with service-connected disabilities .
    • Maintain the existing Work Opportunity Tax Credit for veterans with service-connected disabilities (currently the maximum is $4,800).
    • A new credit of 40 percent of the first $24,000 of wages (up to $9,600) for firms that hire veterans with service-connected disabilities who have been unemployed longer than 6 months.
  • BLS resources
  • additional information
    • http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/08/05/fact-sheet-president-obama-s-commitment-employing-america-s-veterans
    • Jill Houser, Regional Director
    • ETA / Office of Apprenticeship
    • (617 ) 788-0176
    • [email_address]
  • Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development Division of Apprentice Training
  • Overview
    • State Approving Agency Evolving Role
    • The “GI Bills”
    • Eligibility
    • Using the GI Bill
    • Basic Payments
    • Chapter 33 Features
    • Applying for Chapter 33
    • Transferring Entitlement
    • Electing Chapter 33
    • Q& A
  • State Approving Agency Offices Department Of Higher Education 454 Broadway, Suite 200 Revere, MA 02151 State Approving Agency for the GI Bill Division of Apprentice Training 19 Staniford St, 1 st Floor Boston, MA 02114 Private For Profit Colleges / University Trade School On The Job Training Correspondence Apprenticeship
  • Chapters of the GI Bill Chapter Who is eligible? Eligibility Contributions Duration of Benefits Expiration of Benefits 30
    • Active Duty
    • Veterans
    • Paid $1,200 while on active duty
    • 36 months of Full Time Training
    • 10 years after last discharge from active duty
    32
    • Members on active duty from 1/77–6/85
    • Monthly contributions of $25 – $2,700 while on active duty
    • 1–36 months
    • Veteran is refunded unused benefits
    • 10 years after last discharge from active duty
    33
    • Any service member with active duty after 9/10/01 and certain dependents
    • None
    • 36 months
    • 48 months for some veterans
    • 15 years from last discharge from active duty
  • Chapters of the GI Bill Chapter Who is eligible? Eligibility Contributions Duration of Benefits Expiration of Benefits 35
    • Survivor’s and Children of 100% disabled or deceased servicemembers
    • None
    • 45 months
    • 10–14 years from date of discharge or date of eligibility
    1606
    • Select Reservists
    • National Guardsmen
    • None for basic payments, but member can elect $600 “Buy Up”
    • 36 months
    • 14 years from date of eligibility
    1607
    • Select Reservists
    • National Guardsmen
    • None for basic payments, but member can elect $600 “Buy Up”
    • 36 months
    • 14 years from date of eligibility
    • Extends benefit eligibility to 15 years*
      • Beneficiaries receive 36 months of benefits or 48 months if eligible for more than one program
    • Consists of three payments
      • Tuition & fees (paid directly to school)
      • Book stipend up to $1000.00 per year
      • Housing allowance based on school zip
    • Transferability provision to dependents*
    • Length of service establishes maximum benefit
    How is the Post-9/11 GI Bill different? Veteran/Dependent is responsible for charges not covered by VA money.
  • Chapter 33 Eligibility *Includes some but not all National Guard Title 32 activation going back to 8/1/09 but not payable to 10/1/2011 Active Duty* Service (after 9/10/01 serve an aggregate of) % of Maximum Benefit Payable 36 months 100 30 continuous days ( Must be discharged with a disability) 30 months, but less than 36 months 90 24 months, but less than 30 months 80 18 months, but less than 24 months 70 12 months, but less than 18 months 60 06 months, but less than 12 months 50 90 days, but less than 06 months 40 100
  • GI Bill Process Student Veterans Certifying Official Registrar Financial Aid Bursar / Billing School Veterans Admin Tuition / Fee Bill BAH & Book Enrollment Certification T&F Payment Cert. of Eligibility FAFSA
  • What does the Post-9/11 GI Bill pay?
    • Institutions of Higher Learning (Colleges /University)
      • Up to full in-state cost of public institution
      • Up to $17,500.00 per year for private institution
    • Non-College Degree (Career/Trade
      • Up to $17,500.00 per year
    • Apprenticeships / OJT
      • Housing allowance
    • Flight Schools
      • Up to $10,000 per year (Still excludes private pilots licences)
    • LACAS
      • Student can take multiple tests up to $1460.00 per year
  • Housing & Book Payments
    • Housing (DOD - BAH E-5 w/Dependents)
      • (Example for full time training)
        • Boston $2,274.00
        • Worcester $1,458.00
        • Springfield $ 1,407.00
        • Plymouth $1,704.00
        • Haverhill $1,836.00
    • Books and Supplies
      • Up to $1000.00 per year
  • Yellow Ribbon Program
    • For 100%-eligible Ch. 33 veterans or dependents
      • Active duty members are ineligible
    • Intended to pay for costs not covered by the basic payments
    • Dollar-matching program between the school and VA
      • Veteran will be responsible for any remaining costs
    • Yellow Ribbon Program is not guaranteed
      • Limited availability—first come, first serve
      • Optional participation by the school
    • A list of participating schools can be found on the VA web site: www.gibill.va.gov
  • Additional Payment Provisions
    • 100% Distance Education (On Line / Correspondence) gets 50% BAH Rate (Must be 51% enrolled or greater) BAH goes with Zip of School – Payments Effective of 10/1/2011
    • Interval payments no longer paid
    • Students eligible for Voc Rehab (Chapter 31) can choose Chapter 33 BAH
  • Applying for Chapter 33
    • Veterans and active duty members: VA Form 22-1990 or online using VONAPP
    • Have on hand school information, bank routing and account numbers, DD-214
    • Transferees: VA Form 22-1990e or VONAPP
      • Transferors must first complete a TEB and be approved (link to TEB portal available on www.gibill.va.gov )
    If eligible under another chapter, electing Ch. 33 is irrevocable!
  • Applying for Chapter 33 VA Form 22-1990, Application for Education Benefits
    • After applying, visit the campus veterans certifying official who can certify your enrollment to the VA.
    • You’ll need to fill out a FAFSA (Important)
    • The VA has eliminated ALL duplication of VA benefits
    • You cannot receive benefits until your enrollment has been certified.
      • You must visit the certifying official before each term commences.
    Applying for Chapter 33
  • Transferring Entitlement
    • Determine eligibility to transfer via TEB
    • DoD may allow an individual to transfer entitlement to one or more dependents if he/she —
      • Has served at least 6 years in the Armed Forces; and
      • Agrees to serve at least another 4 years in the Armed Forces, some exceptions.
    • Spouses may use transferred benefits after 6 years of service; expires 15 years after members separates/retires
    • Children may use after 10 years of service, and between the ages of 18 – 26
    • Spouse & Dependent need to fill out a FAFSA
    • Effective 10/1/11 PHS & NOAA are eligible to transfer
  • Caveats of Transferring Entitlement
    • An individual approved to transfer may:
      • Transfer up to 36 months of benefits (unless DoD/DHS restricts number of months an individual may transfer).
      • Transfer to spouse or children in any amount up to amount transferor has available or amount approved by DoD/DHS.
      • Revoke or modify a transfer request for any unused benefits unless the 15-year eligibility period has expired.
      • NOT transfer benefits to a new dependent once the transferor is no longer a member of Armed Forces.
  • DoD Transferability of Education Benefits
    • Step 1- Individuals may apply to transfer benefits using the on-line transfer of benefits (TEB) application at:
    • https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/TEB/
    • Or
    • Find the TEB link at
    • http://www.gibill.va.gov
  • Complete SOU
    • If applicable to you…
    • https://minuteman.ngb.army.mil/benefits
    • NOTE: This step is only required if you owe an extension to your MSO.
  • Step 2: Dependent Files VA Form 22-1990e
  • Defining Apprenticeship
    • What is an apprentice?
      • An apprentice is a person who works for another person in order to learn a trade.
    • What are the annual requirements of an approved apprentice training program?
      • 2,000 On-the-Job Training hours + 150 hours of classroom instruction.
    • How long are apprentice training programs?
      • The duration of the program varies according to trade. The employee becomes a certified journey worker at the conclusion of the apprentice period.
  • Benefits of Program Support
    • Employer benefits:
      • Excellent recruiting and retention tool.
      • Creates additional incentive to enhance employee performance.
    • Employee benefits:
      • Augments entry-level wage during full duration of apprentice period.
      • Unlocks MGIB benefits earned through military service that may otherwise go unused.
      • Gain state recognition of journeyworker status in chosen trade.
    • State benefits:
      • An influx of federal military benefit dollars into the Massachusetts economy that would otherwise go unused … and unspent!
  • Other State Education Programs
    • Massachusetts Categorical Tuition Waiver
      • Waives tuition at Public Colleges and Universities
      • Can be used for undergraduate/graduate
      • Classes must be state supported
      • Veteran must be a Massachusetts resident
    • Massachusetts National Guard Tuition and Fee Waiver
      • Waives tuition and fees at Public Colleges and Universities for ACTIVE Mass National Guard members
      • Program pays up to 130 undergraduate credit hours
  • Questions State Approving Agency for GI Bill Programs Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development Division of Apprentice Training
  • Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development Division of Apprentice Training
  • Overview
    • State Approving Agency Evolving Role
    • The “GI Bills”
    • Eligibility
    • Using the GI Bill
    • Basic Payments
    • Chapter 33 Features
    • Applying for Chapter 33
    • Transferring Entitlement
    • Electing Chapter 33
    • Q& A
  • State Approving Agency Offices Department Of Higher Education 454 Broadway, Suite 200 Revere, MA 02151 State Approving Agency for the GI Bill Division of Apprentice Training 19 Staniford St, 1 st Floor Boston, MA 02114 Private For Profit Colleges / University Trade School On The Job Training Correspondence Apprenticeship
  • Chapters of the GI Bill Chapter Who is eligible? Eligibility Contributions Duration of Benefits Expiration of Benefits 30
    • Active Duty
    • Veterans
    • Paid $1,200 while on active duty
    • 36 months of Full Time Training
    • 10 years after last discharge from active duty
    32
    • Members on active duty from 1/77–6/85
    • Monthly contributions of $25 – $2,700 while on active duty
    • 1–36 months
    • Veteran is refunded unused benefits
    • 10 years after last discharge from active duty
    33
    • Any service member with active duty after 9/10/01 and certain dependents
    • None
    • 36 months
    • 48 months for some veterans
    • 15 years from last discharge from active duty
  • Chapters of the GI Bill Chapter Who is eligible? Eligibility Contributions Duration of Benefits Expiration of Benefits 35
    • Survivor’s and Children of 100% disabled or deceased servicemembers
    • None
    • 45 months
    • 10–14 years from date of discharge or date of eligibility
    1606
    • Select Reservists
    • National Guardsmen
    • None for basic payments, but member can elect $600 “Buy Up”
    • 36 months
    • 14 years from date of eligibility
    1607
    • Select Reservists
    • National Guardsmen
    • None for basic payments, but member can elect $600 “Buy Up”
    • 36 months
    • 14 years from date of eligibility
    • Extends benefit eligibility to 15 years*
      • Beneficiaries receive 36 months of benefits or 48 months if eligible for more than one program
    • Consists of three payments
      • Tuition & fees (paid directly to school)
      • Book stipend up to $1000.00 per year
      • Housing allowance based on school zip
    • Transferability provision to dependents*
    • Length of service establishes maximum benefit
    How is the Post-9/11 GI Bill different? Veteran/Dependent is responsible for charges not covered by VA money.
  • Chapter 33 Eligibility *Includes some but not all National Guard Title 32 activation going back to 8/1/09 but not payable to 10/1/2011 Active Duty* Service (after 9/10/01 serve an aggregate of) % of Maximum Benefit Payable 36 months 100 30 continuous days ( Must be discharged with a disability) 30 months, but less than 36 months 90 24 months, but less than 30 months 80 18 months, but less than 24 months 70 12 months, but less than 18 months 60 06 months, but less than 12 months 50 90 days, but less than 06 months 40 100
  • GI Bill Process Student Veterans Certifying Official Registrar Financial Aid Bursar / Billing School Veterans Admin Tuition / Fee Bill BAH & Book Enrollment Certification T&F Payment Cert. of Eligibility FAFSA
  • What does the Post-9/11 GI Bill pay?
    • Institutions of Higher Learning (Colleges /University)
      • Up to full in-state cost of public institution
      • Up to $17,500.00 per year for private institution
    • Non-College Degree (Career/Trade
      • Up to $17,500.00 per year
    • Apprenticeships / OJT
      • Housing allowance
    • Flight Schools
      • Up to $10,000 per year (Still excludes private pilots licences)
    • LACAS
      • Student can take multiple tests up to $1460.00 per year
  • Housing & Book Payments
    • Housing (DOD - BAH E-5 w/Dependents)
      • (Example for full time training)
        • Boston $2,274.00
        • Worcester $1,458.00
        • Springfield $ 1,407.00
        • Plymouth $1,704.00
        • Haverhill $1,836.00
    • Books and Supplies
      • Up to $1000.00 per year
  • Yellow Ribbon Program
    • For 100%-eligible Ch. 33 veterans or dependents
      • Active duty members are ineligible
    • Intended to pay for costs not covered by the basic payments
    • Dollar-matching program between the school and VA
      • Veteran will be responsible for any remaining costs
    • Yellow Ribbon Program is not guaranteed
      • Limited availability—first come, first serve
      • Optional participation by the school
    • A list of participating schools can be found on the VA web site: www.gibill.va.gov
  • Additional Payment Provisions
    • 100% Distance Education (On Line / Correspondence) gets 50% BAH Rate (Must be 51% enrolled or greater) BAH goes with Zip of School – Payments Effective of 10/1/2011
    • Interval payments no longer paid
    • Students eligible for Voc Rehab (Chapter 31) can choose Chapter 33 BAH
  • Applying for Chapter 33
    • Veterans and active duty members: VA Form 22-1990 or online using VONAPP
    • Have on hand school information, bank routing and account numbers, DD-214
    • Transferees: VA Form 22-1990e or VONAPP
      • Transferors must first complete a TEB and be approved (link to TEB portal available on www.gibill.va.gov )
    If eligible under another chapter, electing Ch. 33 is irrevocable!
  • Applying for Chapter 33 VA Form 22-1990, Application for Education Benefits
    • After applying, visit the campus veterans certifying official who can certify your enrollment to the VA.
    • You’ll need to fill out a FAFSA (Important)
    • The VA has eliminated ALL duplication of VA benefits
    • You cannot receive benefits until your enrollment has been certified.
      • You must visit the certifying official before each term commences.
    Applying for Chapter 33
  • Transferring Entitlement
    • Determine eligibility to transfer via TEB
    • DoD may allow an individual to transfer entitlement to one or more dependents if he/she —
      • Has served at least 6 years in the Armed Forces; and
      • Agrees to serve at least another 4 years in the Armed Forces, some exceptions.
    • Spouses may use transferred benefits after 6 years of service; expires 15 years after members separates/retires
    • Children may use after 10 years of service, and between the ages of 18 – 26
    • Spouse & Dependent need to fill out a FAFSA
    • Effective 10/1/11 PHS & NOAA are eligible to transfer
  • Caveats of Transferring Entitlement
    • An individual approved to transfer may:
      • Transfer up to 36 months of benefits (unless DoD/DHS restricts number of months an individual may transfer).
      • Transfer to spouse or children in any amount up to amount transferor has available or amount approved by DoD/DHS.
      • Revoke or modify a transfer request for any unused benefits unless the 15-year eligibility period has expired.
      • NOT transfer benefits to a new dependent once the transferor is no longer a member of Armed Forces.
  • DoD Transferability of Education Benefits
    • Step 1- Individuals may apply to transfer benefits using the on-line transfer of benefits (TEB) application at:
    • https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/TEB/
    • Or
    • Find the TEB link at
    • http://www.gibill.va.gov
  • Complete SOU
    • If applicable to you…
    • https://minuteman.ngb.army.mil/benefits
    • NOTE: This step is only required if you owe an extension to your MSO.
  • Step 2: Dependent Files VA Form 22-1990e
  • Defining Apprenticeship
    • What is an apprentice?
      • An apprentice is a person who works for another person in order to learn a trade.
    • What are the annual requirements of an approved apprentice training program?
      • 2,000 On-the-Job Training hours + 150 hours of classroom instruction.
    • How long are apprentice training programs?
      • The duration of the program varies according to trade. The employee becomes a certified journey worker at the conclusion of the apprentice period.
  • Benefits of Program Support
    • Employer benefits:
      • Excellent recruiting and retention tool.
      • Creates additional incentive to enhance employee performance.
    • Employee benefits:
      • Augments entry-level wage during full duration of apprentice period.
      • Unlocks MGIB benefits earned through military service that may otherwise go unused.
      • Gain state recognition of journeyworker status in chosen trade.
    • State benefits:
      • An influx of federal military benefit dollars into the Massachusetts economy that would otherwise go unused … and unspent!
  • Other State Education Programs
    • Massachusetts Categorical Tuition Waiver
      • Waives tuition at Public Colleges and Universities
      • Can be used for undergraduate/graduate
      • Classes must be state supported
      • Veteran must be a Massachusetts resident
    • Massachusetts National Guard Tuition and Fee Waiver
      • Waives tuition and fees at Public Colleges and Universities for ACTIVE Mass National Guard members
      • Program pays up to 130 undergraduate credit hours
  • Questions State Approving Agency for GI Bill Programs Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development Division of Apprentice Training