Bi-level Case Management: A System Approach to Service Delivery A presentation for the  USDOL Region One  Conference on Se...
WORKING DEFINITION OF  CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>A participant centered,  </li></ul><ul><li>goal-oriented process for </li><...
Building A Case Management System <ul><li>What should a case management system look like? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A standard...
Building A Case Management System (cont.) <ul><li>Why a System is Needed : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Standardization of Servic...
Building A Case Management System (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Organized to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>serve large numbers of part...
Characteristics and Advantages of a Bi-level Case Management System <ul><li>Definition of Bi-level Case Management </li></...
Essential Case Management Functions <ul><li>System Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><li>  Lead the entire case </li><...
Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>System Level Responsibilities (cont.)   </li></ul><ul><li>Empower case managers to “re...
Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>Participant Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and prioritize personal...
Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>Participant Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Successfully complete a “cus...
Phases of Case Management Intervention Start ENGAGING ASSESSING PLANNING ACCESSING RESOURCES COORDINATING DISENGAGING
Partnership: The Essential Case Management Relationship <ul><li>Establishing and maintaining a partnership with participan...
The Partnership Relationship (cont.) <ul><ul><li>A dynamic approach to case </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>management establis...
Partnership Expectations of Participants Throughout the Case Management Process <ul><li>ASSESSMENT PHASE – SELF-DISCOVERY ...
Making A Demand for Work <ul><li>Start the case management relationship with an explanation of partnership and your expect...
Making A Demand for Work (cont.) <ul><li>Be prepared to define the participant’s work throughout the process </li></ul><ul...
Why A Partnership? <ul><li>Growth and change on the part of the participant is usually required to meet case management go...
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Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management

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The complexities of meeting individual and program service goals require a systematic and comprehensive service delivery approach at both the organizational and front-line worker levels. This workshop will provide a clear definition of a bi-level service delivery system, its purpose, structure, and components. The necessity of partnerships at all levels, and how they are developed, will be emphasized.

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Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management

  1. 1. Bi-level Case Management: A System Approach to Service Delivery A presentation for the USDOL Region One Conference on Services to Older Youth November 14-16, 2011 Boston, MA Anne C. Adams, MSW [email_address]
  2. 2. WORKING DEFINITION OF CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>A participant centered, </li></ul><ul><li>goal-oriented process for </li></ul><ul><li>assessing the needs of an </li></ul><ul><li>individual for particular </li></ul><ul><li>services and assisting the </li></ul><ul><li>person to obtain those </li></ul><ul><li>services. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Building A Case Management System <ul><li>What should a case management system look like? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A standardized process which has been developed to achieve the primary end goal - long term employability </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Building A Case Management System (cont.) <ul><li>Why a System is Needed : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Standardization of Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What happens to a participant should not be based upon which case manager they get </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance Objectives are More Realistically Developed, Achieved and Documented. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Building A Case Management System (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Organized to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>serve large numbers of participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>monitor participant progress </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>correct participant challenges or enhance participant accomplishments as they advance towards their goals </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Characteristics and Advantages of a Bi-level Case Management System <ul><li>Definition of Bi-level Case Management </li></ul><ul><li>A systematic approach to service delivery that: </li></ul><ul><li>develops a strategy for coordinating the provision of services and actively supports the implementation of that strategy [system level] </li></ul><ul><li>utilizes a participant-centered, goal oriented process for assessing strengths and needs [participant level] </li></ul><ul><li>assists participants to utilize necessary services to achieve individual and programmatic goals [ participant level ] </li></ul>
  7. 7. Essential Case Management Functions <ul><li>System Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><li> Lead the entire case </li></ul><ul><li> management team in designing a </li></ul><ul><li> system wide strategy for service </li></ul><ul><li> delivery. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Insure the availability of commonly needed services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Insure that case managers know what they can and cannot promise participants </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>System Level Responsibilities (cont.) </li></ul><ul><li>Empower case managers to “requisition” services and resources across institutional boundaries [essential to successful partnerships and collaboration] </li></ul><ul><li>Revise traditional modes of operation when they do not work in the participants’ best interest </li></ul>
  9. 9. Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>Participant Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and prioritize personal strengths and needs, and translate them into a set of realistic goals </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a plan of action for achieving the goals </li></ul><ul><li>Access the resources needed to pursue those goals across institutions </li></ul>
  10. 10. Essential Functions (cont.) <ul><li>Participant Level Responsibilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Successfully complete a “customized” set of services among a variety of institutions [real partnership in action] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Help the participant access services on his or her own thereby reducing dependency on the case manager </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Phases of Case Management Intervention Start ENGAGING ASSESSING PLANNING ACCESSING RESOURCES COORDINATING DISENGAGING
  12. 12. Partnership: The Essential Case Management Relationship <ul><li>Establishing and maintaining a partnership with participants should be both the initial and sustaining focus and function of the case manager/participant relationship </li></ul>
  13. 13. The Partnership Relationship (cont.) <ul><ul><li>A dynamic approach to case </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>management establishes a </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>partnership with participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and makes a “demand for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>work” at all phases of the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>relationship </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Partnership Expectations of Participants Throughout the Case Management Process <ul><li>ASSESSMENT PHASE – SELF-DISCOVERY </li></ul><ul><li>PLANNING PHASE – SELF-PLANNING </li></ul><ul><li>IMPLEMENTATION PHASE – SELF- </li></ul><ul><li>MONITORING </li></ul><ul><li>FOLLOW-UP PHASE - LEADERSHIP </li></ul>
  15. 15. Making A Demand for Work <ul><li>Start the case management relationship with an explanation of partnership and your expectations of the participant </li></ul><ul><li>Model the expectation of partnership during the initial interview as well as throughout the course of your work together </li></ul>
  16. 16. Making A Demand for Work (cont.) <ul><li>Be prepared to define the participant’s work throughout the process </li></ul><ul><li>Do not accept failures to produce </li></ul><ul><li>Do not advance when work has not been completed </li></ul>
  17. 17. Why A Partnership? <ul><li>Growth and change on the part of the participant is usually required to meet case management goals </li></ul><ul><li>Personal growth and change require the active involvement of an individual </li></ul><ul><li>Workers should not be working harder on a person’s life than they are </li></ul>

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