Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management
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Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management

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The complexities of meeting individual and program service goals require a systematic and comprehensive service delivery approach at both the organizational and front-line worker levels. This workshop ...

The complexities of meeting individual and program service goals require a systematic and comprehensive service delivery approach at both the organizational and front-line worker levels. This workshop will provide a clear definition of a bi-level service delivery system, its purpose, structure, and components. The necessity of partnerships at all levels, and how they are developed, will be emphasized.

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Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management Learning Session 1-7 Bi-level Case Management Presentation Transcript

  • Bi-level Case Management: A System Approach to Service Delivery A presentation for the USDOL Region One Conference on Services to Older Youth November 14-16, 2011 Boston, MA Anne C. Adams, MSW [email_address]
  • WORKING DEFINITION OF CASE MANAGEMENT
    • A participant centered,
    • goal-oriented process for
    • assessing the needs of an
    • individual for particular
    • services and assisting the
    • person to obtain those
    • services.
  • Building A Case Management System
    • What should a case management system look like?
      • A standardized process which has been developed to achieve the primary end goal - long term employability
  • Building A Case Management System (cont.)
    • Why a System is Needed :
      • Standardization of Services
          • What happens to a participant should not be based upon which case manager they get
      • Performance Objectives are More Realistically Developed, Achieved and Documented.
  • Building A Case Management System (cont.)
      • Organized to:
      • serve large numbers of participants
      • monitor participant progress
      • correct participant challenges or enhance participant accomplishments as they advance towards their goals
  • Characteristics and Advantages of a Bi-level Case Management System
    • Definition of Bi-level Case Management
    • A systematic approach to service delivery that:
    • develops a strategy for coordinating the provision of services and actively supports the implementation of that strategy [system level]
    • utilizes a participant-centered, goal oriented process for assessing strengths and needs [participant level]
    • assists participants to utilize necessary services to achieve individual and programmatic goals [ participant level ]
  • Essential Case Management Functions
    • System Level Responsibilities:
    • Lead the entire case
    • management team in designing a
    • system wide strategy for service
    • delivery.
        • Insure the availability of commonly needed services
        • Insure that case managers know what they can and cannot promise participants
  • Essential Functions (cont.)
    • System Level Responsibilities (cont.)
    • Empower case managers to “requisition” services and resources across institutional boundaries [essential to successful partnerships and collaboration]
    • Revise traditional modes of operation when they do not work in the participants’ best interest
  • Essential Functions (cont.)
    • Participant Level Responsibilities:
    • Identify and prioritize personal strengths and needs, and translate them into a set of realistic goals
    • Develop a plan of action for achieving the goals
    • Access the resources needed to pursue those goals across institutions
  • Essential Functions (cont.)
    • Participant Level Responsibilities:
      • Successfully complete a “customized” set of services among a variety of institutions [real partnership in action]
      • Help the participant access services on his or her own thereby reducing dependency on the case manager
  • Phases of Case Management Intervention Start ENGAGING ASSESSING PLANNING ACCESSING RESOURCES COORDINATING DISENGAGING
  • Partnership: The Essential Case Management Relationship
    • Establishing and maintaining a partnership with participants should be both the initial and sustaining focus and function of the case manager/participant relationship
  • The Partnership Relationship (cont.)
      • A dynamic approach to case
      • management establishes a
      • partnership with participants
      • and makes a “demand for
      • work” at all phases of the
      • relationship
  • Partnership Expectations of Participants Throughout the Case Management Process
    • ASSESSMENT PHASE – SELF-DISCOVERY
    • PLANNING PHASE – SELF-PLANNING
    • IMPLEMENTATION PHASE – SELF-
    • MONITORING
    • FOLLOW-UP PHASE - LEADERSHIP
  • Making A Demand for Work
    • Start the case management relationship with an explanation of partnership and your expectations of the participant
    • Model the expectation of partnership during the initial interview as well as throughout the course of your work together
  • Making A Demand for Work (cont.)
    • Be prepared to define the participant’s work throughout the process
    • Do not accept failures to produce
    • Do not advance when work has not been completed
  • Why A Partnership?
    • Growth and change on the part of the participant is usually required to meet case management goals
    • Personal growth and change require the active involvement of an individual
    • Workers should not be working harder on a person’s life than they are