Sustaining Turnaround at Scale: Realizing

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  • Source: ERS Library SlidesJDAUG08
    Location: \\Minerva\ers_data\Internal ERS\Slide Library Documents\1-ERS Slides
  • Sustaining Turnaround at Scale: Realizing

    1. 1. Rethinking Resources for Student Success Sustaining Turnaround at Scale Opening Session, October 13, 2011 Realizing the Promise
    2. 2. Education Resource Strategies 2  Explore opportunities and challenges involved in attempting school turnaround at scale  Begin planning NOW to sustain turnaround work once transition funding and special exemptions run out  Identify ways we need to work together to raise the likelihood of success  Celebrate, honor and support each other’s efforts Sustaining Turnaround at Scale: Summit Goals
    3. 3. Education Resource Strategies 3  Boston  Charlotte-Mecklenburg  Chicago  Cincinnati  Denver  District of Columbia  Duval County (Jacksonville  Providence Summit Participants: District Teams
    4. 4. Education Resource Strategies 4  Academy of Urban School Leadership  Achievement Network  Blueprint Schools Network  Citizen Schools  City Connects  City Year  Corporation for National and Community Service  Council of Chief State School Officers  Mass Insight Education  National Center for Time and Learning  New Leaders for New Schools  New Schools Venture Fund Summit Participants: Partners  New Schools Venture Fund  ReNEW  Say Yes to Education  Strategic Grant Partners  TeachPlus  The Annenberg Institute for School Reform  The Aspen Institute  The Education Trust  The New Teacher Project  Turnaround for Children  U.S. Department of Education  University of Virginia Partnership for Leaders in Education
    5. 5. Education Resource Strategies 5  We are a non-profit firm dedicated to helping school systems spend and organize time, talent and technology to create great schools at scale  We partner with system leaders to analyze spending, human resource, organization and student data to better align with high performance strategies  We leverage insight from this work to provide lessons and tools for school leaders and those who support them  Our work is grounded in over a decade of experience working with school districts across the country 5 Education Resource Strategies
    6. 6. Education Resource Strategies 6 Making Meaning and Sharing Lessons Break out panels and working groups 8:30-10:15 Session #1: Building a turnaround principal pipeline Session #2: Building a strong teaching force Session #3: Using data effectively 10:30-12:15 Session #4: Using and extending time Session #5: School designs for turnaround Session #6: Reengineering the school-community relationship 12:15-1:30 Lunch and speaker Jason Snyder, DOE 2:30-3:30 Facilitated small group working sessions 3:45-4:30 Wrap up and reflection panel
    7. 7. Education Resource Strategies 7 Communicating from the Summit
    8. 8. Education Resource Strategies 8 1. Clear goals for student learning and engaging curriculum that aligns to standards 2. Strong leaders who build a culture of high expectations and ownership of student outcomes 3. Effective Teacher teams with expertise, time and support collaborate to adjust instruction using data student progress 4. Intervention for individual learning needs (Special Ed, ELL, gifted and struggling) that integrates with core instruction 5. Individual attention and schedules that prioritize core academics and allow time for students to catch up 6. Safe, welcoming community for students and families 7. Ongoing use of data for continuous improvement We know the essential traits of continuously improving schools
    9. 9. Education Resource Strategies 9 But some schools can’t get there because they are trapped in a cycle of failure Declining expectations (faculty, students, families) Remaining students fall further behind and high needs get concentrated Teachers and families with options leave Persistently poor performance Resource levels and expertise no longer match needs Leaders and teachers have less capacity to collaborate and adjust instruction
    10. 10. Education Resource Strategies 10 1. Strong leaders who build high expectations and ownership 2. Collaborative teacher teams with combined expertise to meet student needs 3. Expertise and resources to serve high concentrations of students with high need To break the cycle of failure, schools must accelerate the pace of improvement through:
    11. 11. Education Resource Strategies 11 Mixed results of turnaround efforts suggest that investing in some schools may not be enough to reverse cycle due to community disengagement, location or facilities challenges Declining expectations (faculty, students, families) Remaining students fall further behind and high needs get concentrated Teachers and families with options leave Persistently poor performance Resource levels and expertise no longer match needs Leaders and teachers have less capacity to collaborate and adjust instruction
    12. 12. Education Resource Strategies 12  District-wide strategy for measuring school performance and diagnosing appropriate action including school closure  Definition of a school turnaround model  Accountability and support  Removal of barriers to implementing effective turnaround practices  Integration with district-wide strategy of accountability, autonomy and support To address core challenges, district turnaround strategies have five components
    13. 13. Education Resource Strategies 13 Defining a model for strategic intervention Strategic Intervention SchoolLevel Transformational leaders Ensure a transformational principal in every school Effective Teaching Teams with Expert Support Ensure needed expertise and provide support for teams to continuously improve instruction Individual attention and time for accelerated learning Vary and extend individual and small group time and attention in response to student needs) Productive School Culture Invest school community in high expectations for learning and behavior Health, social and emotional support Guarantee baseline health, social, and emotional support to students to ensure readiness for learning System Level Central support and accountability Provide additional school supervisory support and attention Removal of Barriers to Effective Turnaround practices Actively remove district policies, contractual restrictions and state regulatory barriers that limit hiring, organization and use of time
    14. 14. Education Resource Strategies 14 District’s Turnaround investments suggest different levels of intensity and emphasis CATEGORY INVESTMENT ($ invested in a 1,000 student school) Year 1 Charlotte Miami-Dade Chicago(HS) Strong leaders $20,000 $493,000 $136,000 Effective teacher teams $50,000 $630,000 $612,000 Individual attention and time for acceleration – $425,000 $817,000 Productive school culture – $179,000 $1,042,000 Health, social and emotional – – $187,000 Central support – $140,000 $350,000 Total $70,000 $1,871,000 $3,144,000 Source: District reported to ERS
    15. 15. Education Resource Strategies 15 And investment level analysis must consider base funding levels $14,500 $8,500 $11,500 $10,300 $7,400 $11,500 $1,500 $100 $3,144 $2,000 $1,249 $823 $0 $2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000 $10,000 $12,000 $14,000 $16,000 $18,000 Boston Charlotte Chicago Denver Miami AUSL Spending Per Pupil Additional $ for Turnaround Students $16,000 $8,600 $14,644 $12,300 $8,649 $12,323 K-12 9-12 K-12 K-12 Elem, HSK-12 TotalSpendingPerPupil Source: District reported to ERS
    16. 16. Education Resource Strategies 16 Summit districts employ a mix of strategies regarding school leader autonomy Traditional District School Typical Charter School District-Run Turnaround Zone School Hiring and Firing Varies Staffing Composition Varies Curriculum and Assessments Varies Teacher compensation Professional Growth and Collaboration Time Varies Scheduling and Time Varies LowAutonomyHighAutonomy
    17. 17. Education Resource Strategies 17 District Approaches: “In a Nutshell” District Approach Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools Hire great principals, let them bring in a core turnaround team and set them free Denver Public Schools Create a portfolio of charter, innovation, and district-run schools, with family choice Boston Public Schools Collaborate with schools and outside providers on intervention strategies within framework, adapt to fit school needs Chicago Public Schools Comprehensive, standardized, supported model; district runs 1/3 of schools, outsource others to AUSL Cincinnati Public Schools Intensively train school leaders and provide them with a comprehensive, standardized, supported model More Autonomy Less Autonomy
    18. 18. Education Resource Strategies 18  Resources – “Civic Capacity” – Base Funding Levels – State resources for English Language Learners or concentrated poverty  The nature of the challenge – Starting proficiency levels – % of district schools at crisis levels – Safety Factors that influence district approach  Flexibility to organize resources – Union contracts and relationship – State requirements  Existing teacher and leadership capacity  District “Theory of Action”
    19. 19. Education Resource Strategies 19  Ann Clark, Chief Academic Officer, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools  Deborah McGriff, Partner, New Schools Venture Fund Designing and refining a district turnaround strategy  Noemi Donoso, Chief Education Officer, Chicago Public Schools  Alyssa Whitehead-Bust, Chief of Innovation and Reform, Boston Public Schools
    20. 20. Education Resource Strategies 20 Summit Agenda: Friday Time Event Location 7:30-8:30 Breakfast Available Concord Room Break out panels and working groups 8:30-10:15 Session #1: Building a turnaround principal pipeline Concord Room Session #2: Building a strong teaching force Bedford Room A Session #3: Using data effectively Bedford Room B 10:30-12:15 Session #4: Using and extending time Concord Room Session #5: School designs for turnaround Bedford Room A Session #6: Reengineering the school-community relationship Bedford Room B 12:15-1:30 Lunch and speaker Jason Snyder, DOE Concord Room 2:30-3:30 Small group working sessions (various, see agenda) 3:45-4:30 Wrap up and reflection panel Concord Room

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