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Karen Hawley Miles' presentation as the keynote speaker of the Rennie Center's event, Smart School Budgeting, on October 3, 2012.

Karen Hawley Miles' presentation as the keynote speaker of the Rennie Center's event, Smart School Budgeting, on October 3, 2012.

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  • Tell story of how I got into this…
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  • Other tradeoffs to consider:Allow benefits spending to increase by 10% OR Add 60 minutes to the school day in the 25% lowest performing schoolsGive all teachers annual step increase OR Provide half-day PreK for 50% of incoming Kindergarten students
  • Other tradeoffs to consider:Allow benefits spending to increase by 10% OR Add 60 minutes to the school day in the 25% lowest performing schoolsGive all teachers annual step increase OR Provide half-day PreK for 50% of incoming Kindergarten students
  • Other tradeoffs to consider:Allow benefits spending to increase by 10% OR Add 60 minutes to the school day in the 25% lowest performing schoolsGive all teachers annual step increase OR Provide half-day PreK for 50% of incoming Kindergarten students

Transcript

  • 1. Tough Times as Opportunity Karen Hawley Miles October 3, 3012
  • 2. Systemic Budget Gaps cost structure rises regardless of revenue • Longevity based teaching salaries grow at ~2-4% annually • Benefits growing at ~10+% annually • SPED spending continues to grow • Pre-set COLA increases• Tax revenue falling• Enrollment declining• Drop in Federal Funds Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 2
  • 3. What do industrial-age structures mean for a 6th grade student like Tamika? • Tamika has always loved school • Proficient in reading but behind in math • One of 100 students her math teacher is responsible for • 2 out 4 of her teachers are novices • Her teachers don’t know she’s behind • Her teachers don’t know what makes her smile 3
  • 4. …and for her teacher, Ms. Jones?• 100 students and two different courses• no past information about Tamika• no assessment tools or support for Tamika• Has one duty-free period, but no time with other math teachers• She sees her mentor who doesn’t teach math, but only for coffee• Ms. Jones feels powerless and alone. 4
  • 5. Four highest priorities for transformation:1. Restructure job and compensation structure to attract needed expertise, promote teamwork, and link to contribution2. Rethink standardized class size model to target individual attention by strategically raising class sizes and rethinking one-size-fits-all class size models for providing individual attention3. Shift special education spending toward early intervention and targeted individual attention in general education settings where possible4. Optimize existing time to meet student and teacher needs and extend where needed 5
  • 6. High Performing Schools are about team, not just individual performance Deliberate OR assignments toIsolated with teaching teamlittle support School-based expert Collaborative support planning time Formative assessments Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 6
  • 7. Teacher Salary Components TYPICAL DISTRICT MAXIMUM TEACHER SALARY =$75,000 100% Leadership, Respons ibility, 10% Education, 10% 80% Longevity, 30% 60% 40% Base, 50% 20% 0%ERS Analysis of partner and Aspen district salary structures Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 7
  • 8. Most districts devote less than 5% of all teacher compensation spending to reward increased teacher contribution or performance 120% 100% 24% Benefits 80% >1% Responsibility and Results 60% 27% Longevity 40% 7% Education 20% 42% Base 0% District with Senior Teacher ForceSource: ERS Analysis Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 8
  • 9. Industrial Age Compensation Structures don’t match needs of information age work-force  Early career teacher salaries not Attract competitive with comparable professional opportunities  All teachers paid the same regardless of contribution or role. Slow rise in Retain salary & pension structure encourages low performers to stay  Leverage Limited opportunity or incentive to take on greater challenges or Expertise leadership roles Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 9
  • 10. To transform the teaching job, in the short term...To Reverse MisalignmentsCut spending • Reduce benefits spendingby • Shrink or end automatic step increases • Tighten approval process for moving lanesIncrease • Pay more for high-needs and leadership jobsspending to • Support expert-led teacher teaming • Restructure time for teaming and planningTo Support Sustainable TransformationInvest • Build effective evaluation and data systemstransition • Create new school designs that make teaching job moreresources to doable • Design new compensation structures Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 10
  • 11. Four highest priorities for transformation:1. Restructure job and compensation structure to attract needed expertise, promote teamwork and link to contribution2. Rethink standardized class size model to target individual attention by strategically raising class sizes and rethinking one-size-fits-all class size models for providing individual attention3. Shift special education spending toward early intervention and targeted individual attention in general education settings where possible4. Optimize existing time to meet student and teacher needs and extend where needed Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 11
  • 12. Most schools have significant numbers of adults Example District: Elementary School-Level Staffing Ratios Regular Class Size 23 Regular Ed Student Teacher Ratio 17 Pubils per Teacher 12 Pupils per Instructor 10 Pupils per Professional 9 Pupils per Staff 7Instructor = Teachers & para’s 0 10 20 30 Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 12
  • 13. “Push in” models that utilize expert resource teachers can increase individual attention and build teaching capacity and communityStudent : Teacher ratio—18:1 Student : Teacher ratio—9:1 Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 13
  • 14. Typically secondary schools don’t vary class size by subjects Class Size (General Ed) 45 41 40Average Class Size 35 30 28 28 27 26 25 24 25 20 15 10 5 0 ELA Math Science Social StudiesLanguage Non Core PE/Health Note: Core includes ELA, Math, Science, Social Studies & Foreign Language. NonCore includes art/music, voc/career & computer literacy, internships & ROTC. Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 14
  • 15. Even within core classes, class sizes are not necessarily being differentiated strategically by grade or student need Math: Class 9th Grade Math: Size by Grade Size by Need 22 23 23 22 20 19 21 21 20 15 7 8 9 10 11 12 Grade Level*Source: RCSD SY0910 Budget; RCSD SY0910 BEDS data; ERS analysis Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 15
  • 16. Legacy practices mean students face sudden loss of personal attention from teachers in middle school Teacher Pupil Load in Academic Subjects Typical Urban District 150 160 140 125Number Students SeenBy Regular Ed Teacher 120 100 80 60 40 21 20 0 K–5 6–8 9–12 Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 16
  • 17. Cycle of Isolation and Specialization Large, diverse classes Teachers without needed expertise and support Remove “problem” Add on support student Administration to coordinate Resources and responsibility fragmented Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 17
  • 18. More spending on separate classrooms means less on early intervention SAMPLE DISTRICT SPENDING BY STUDENT TYPE $45 2009-2010 $40 Fully Allocated $ Per Pupil $35 Poverty Increment (Thousands) $30 $25 $20 $42.6 $15 $10 $19.9 $15.2 $5 $11.7 $0 General Ed LEP Sped Resource Sped Separate Enrollment: 37.8K 6.6K 5.4K 5.5K Weight: 1.0 1.2 1.7 3.5Note: Excluded are all district Alternative/Adult schools.Sources: SY10 October enrollment, district budget as of 10/09. Excludes students who did not report; ELL includes those currently in programs, excludes students who opted-out Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 18
  • 19. To target individual attention to students, in the short term...To Reverse MisalignmentsReduce • Increase general class size targetsspending • Increase class size for low need students, grades andby… subjectsIncrease • Reduce group size for high need students, skills, gradespending levels and subjectsto… • Pay teachers more for dual certification (ELL and Sped)To Support Sustainable TransformationInvest • Expert support and PD to increase teacher capacity to usetransition individual attention strategiesresources in • Formative assessments and tools to enable targeted instruction and grouping • Technology to leverage teacher time and customize instruction Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 19
  • 20. Four highest priorities for transformation:1. Restructure job and compensation structure to attract needed expertise, promote teamwork and link to contribution2. Rethink standardized class size model to target individual attention by strategically raising class sizes and rethinking one-size-fits-all class size models for providing individual attention3. Shift special education spending toward early intervention and targeted individual attention in general education settings where possible4. Optimize existing time to meet student and teacher needs and extend where needed Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 20
  • 21. Questions? Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 21
  • 22. You Have Choices Trade-offs for TransformationFor the same cost, a typical 25,000-student urban district can: Pay the top Reduce class OR contributing sizes grades 4- 15% of 12 by 2 teachers $10K more Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 22
  • 23. Trade-offs for TransformationFor the same cost, a typical 25,000-student urban district can: Add 60 Allow benefits OR minutes to the spending to school day in increase by the 25% lowest 10% performing schools Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 23
  • 24. Trade-offs for TransformationFor the same cost, a typical 25,000-student urban district can: Provide half- Give all OR day PreK for teachers 50% of annual step incoming increase Kindergarten students Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 24
  • 25. Transform Now Play Assess Analyze Make Trade-Offs ResourceCheck ERStrategies. orgLearn more Explore the Find the tools you Go deeper andabout budget seven strategies need to connect exploretrade-offs and begin to your resource strategy-during tough quantify where decisions to specific self-times. your district improving assessments. stands. performance. Education Resource Strategies, Inc. 25