Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources

409

Published on

This presentation was used in a session at the Policy Leadership Academy hosted by Leadership for Education Equity, a political organization that mobilizes, supports and trains Teach for America …

This presentation was used in a session at the Policy Leadership Academy hosted by Leadership for Education Equity, a political organization that mobilizes, supports and trains Teach for America alumni.

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
409
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Leading Education Reform in an Era of Limited Resources LEE Policy Leadership AcademyRethinking Resourcesfor Student Success July 28, 2012
  • 2. Education Resource Strategies: Who we areERS is a non-profit dedicated to helpingschool systems spend and organizetime, talent and technology to creategreat schools at scale Education Resource Strategies 2
  • 3. Public Ed budget gaps will continue $850,000 Budget Gap by 2017 is 9.1% $800,000 $750,000 $700,000 Current spending $650,000 trajectory Likely revenues $600,000 $550,000 $500,000Source: Marguerite Roza, Research Associate Professor at the University of Washingtons College of Education and Senior Scholar at theCenter on Reinventing Public Education. November 2011; Current spending trajectory assumes no incremental reforms and spending growthof 4%Education Resource Strategies 3
  • 4. Why? Increasing: • Teaching salaries • Benefits • Special Ed programs • COLA (cost of living adjustments) Declining: • Tax revenue • Enrollment • Federal FundsEducation Resource Strategies 4
  • 5. We have created a labor intensive publiceducation system – salaries and benefitsincrease every year Growth in Per Pupil Expenditure (1970-2005) Salaries & Benefits 26% 23% Increase # non-teachers (excl SPED) Increase # of teachers (excl SPED) Increase # SPED staff Increase Benefits Rate 10% 21% All Other 19% Almost 75% of growth in spending came from salaries and benefitsSource: The Parthenon Group, 2007 from NCES; Educational Research Service; Parthenon AnalysisEducation Resource Strategies 5
  • 6. Public education jobs continued to growthrough recessionsSource: Marguerite RozaEducation Resource Strategies 6
  • 7. Typical responses preserve currentstructures and attempt to do less with less Furlough days Across the board cuts Frozen salaries Incremental staffing ratio adjustmentsEducation Resource Strategies 7
  • 8. Where do you look to begin addressing thegap? 1 2 3 Pray for Restructure & re- Identify new economic imagine what is funding sources recovery possible 1. © Funny Times Education Resource Strategies 2. © Original Artist. Reproduction rights obtainable from cartoonstock.com 8 3. © http://employee-rewards-incentives.blogspot.com/2009/02/employee-meetings.html
  • 9. Why is restructuring difficult? Currently “Inputs” are dictated to schools… …But schools are accountable for “outcomes”Input Discrete Time Teacher Class Size Subject Requirements Certification Requirements (Carnegie Units)Desired College and Subject matter High quality IndividualOutcome Work ready proficiency instruction Student HS graduate AttentionEducation Resource Strategies 9
  • 10. Who is dictating the inputs? Federal Com- State munity School District UnionEducation Resource Strategies 10
  • 11. The four highest priorities for restructuring:1. Restructure teaching job and compensation structure2. Rethink standardized class size model3. Shift special education spending4. Optimize existing time and extend where neededEducation Resource Strategies 11
  • 12. A typical district devotes 1% of 1. Restructure teaching compensation 2. Rethink class size modelteacher compensation spending to 3. Shift special education spending 4. Optimize use of timereward increased contribution $500 Million 24% Benefits >1% Increased Contribution 27% Longevity 7% $35M Education Base 42% Source: ERS AnalysisEducation Resource Strategies 12
  • 13. 1. Restructure teaching compensationHow can teachers increase 2. Rethink class size model 3. Shift special education spendingtheir contribution? 4. Optimize use of time Assume a leadership role in the school and/or district Individual and team- Innovate better ways to deliver instruction and based improve student measurements of outcomes student growth (academic, behavioral) Take on larger class Take on a position in sizes or more a high-priority school challenging classesEducation Resource Strategies 13
  • 14. Typical districts have 1. Restructure teaching compensation 2. Rethink class size model opportunities to target class sizes 3. Shift special education spending 4. Optimize use of time to priority subjects and students Avg Class Size by Subject Area Avg 9th Grade Math Class Size by District T Student Performance Group District P30 27 30 27 26 24 2520 18 2010 100 0 9th Grade Core Class 12th Grade Non-Core Repeaters Double One Basic Proficient Size Class Size Basic & Advanced Low Performers High Performers *Core class defined as ELA, Math, Science, Social Studies and Foreign Languages; Non-core defined as Art, Computer Literacy, Vocational, Source: District T and District P high school course data (internal – Resource Mapping presentation); District P 8 th grade state standardized test scores Education Resource Strategies 14
  • 15. 1. Restructure teaching compensation 2. Rethink class size model Special Ed is often used as a 3. Shift special education spending 4. Optimize use of time catch-all program Special Ed Enrollment in “Softer” Categories as Percent of Subgroup 18% Example urban district 16% 14% 16% 12% 10% Subgroup 8% 10% 9% 9% Other 6% 4% 5% 5% 2% 4% 4% 0% Low IncomeAfrican Amer Male LI AA Male This is Expensive – Spending per pupil for Special Ed is typically 2X – 4X compared to Gen Ed“Softer” Special Ed categories include Emotional Disabilities, Mild Intellectual Disabilities and Specific Learning Disabilities.“Harder” Special Ed categories include Deaf-Blindness, Developmental Delay, Hearing Impairment, Multiple Disabilities, OrthopedicImpairment, Intellectual Disabilities – Moderate and Severe, Traumatic Brain Injury (TB) and Visual Impairment Source: Example district student database Education Resource Strategies 15
  • 16. 1. Restructure teaching compensation 2. Rethink class size modelSpending on Special Education has 3. Shift special education spending 4. Optimize use of timeincreased significantly Federal Grants to States for Special Education Special Education >$11 Billion spending has grown from 4% to 21% of total school spending between 1970 and 2005 Is the increased spending worthwhile? <$250M The drop out rate for students with disabilities is two times that of general education students --U.S. Dept of Education*Sources: “Rethinking Special Ed Spending” by Frederick Hess, Education Next, 6/16/2011; 2006 U.S. Budget, Historical Tables; “The DropoutRate of Special Needs Students” by Finn Orfano 10/26/2010 in Bright Hub quoting statistics from the US Dept Of EducationEducation Resource Strategies 16
  • 17. Typical schools allocate time in 1. Restructure teaching compensation 2. Rethink class size model rigid blocks that don’t change 3. Shift special education spending 4. Optimize use of time based on need or priority 9th Grade Student Time by Student Performance Category District P Core Non-Core Support & Enrichment 100% 90% 24% 29% 28% 27% 32% 80%% of Instructional Time 70% 60% 50% 40% 75% 70% 69% 72% 67% 30% 20% 10% 0% All 9th Graders Repeaters Double Basic 1 Basic Proficient/Advanced 9th Grade Student Performance Category Low Performers High Performers Core class defined as ELA, Math, Science, Social Studies;, Foreign Languages ; Non-core defined as Art, Computer Literacy, Vocational Source: District P HS Course Schedule Data SY0910, ERS HS Resource Use Analysis Education Resource Strategies 17
  • 18. 1. Restructure teaching compensationHow can schools transform 2. Rethink class size model 3. Shift special education spendinghow time is used? 4. Optimize use of time Larger Class vs. Larger Class Larger ClassEducation Resource Strategies 18
  • 19. What can districts and schools do to optimize use of resources?1. Restructure Teacher Comp•Limit teacher compensation directed 2. Rethink Class Size Modeltowards steps and lanes •Strategically raise class sizes where•Build new evaluation systems to accurately appropriatemeasure teacher effectiveness •Highlight class size vs. teacher quality•Compensate for increased responsibilities trade-off& contribution3. Shift Special Ed Spending 4. Optimize Use of Time•Reduce Special Ed spending on •Longer blocks in key subjects forsubscale programs struggling students•Move away from class size mandates •Regularly adjust time and staffing•Invest in early intervention according to student progress•Integrate special ed with gen ed as •Leverage technology to redefinemuch as possible by employing dual instructioncertified and teacher teams Education Resource Strategies 19
  • 20. Trade-offs for Transformation For the same cost a typical 25,000 student urban district can: Pay the top contributing Reduce class sizes grades 4-12 by 2 OR 15% of teachers $10K more Add 60 minutes to the Allow benefits spending school day in the 25% OR lowest performing to increase by 10% schools Provide half-day pre-K Give all teachers annual step increase OR for 50% of incoming Kindergarten studentsERS’ District Reallocation Modeler (DREAM)Education Resource Strategies 20
  • 21. Now it’s time to play … Hold „Em ExperienceSchool Budget Hold‟em Ga DOE + 5 districts An interactive game to help districts Rochester, NY make thoughtful trade-offs as part of the budgeting process Duval County, FL Encourages transparency and Prince George‟s County, MD accessibility Memphis, TN Cleveland, OH Aspen CFO/CAO network Council of Chief State School Officers PIE Network Education Resource Strategies 21
  • 22. Why a card game? Allows you to put on the hat of school district leaders and understand the tough choices they must make Removes us from the traditional budget process of fighting for resources within silos Focuses on investing in district priorities by freeing resources from low value- added “historic” uses Enables teams to engage in open exploration of a range of options available to the district in a low stakes environment Builds understanding of relative size of different options Playing cards frees “non-spreadsheet” types to interact in new ways with the budgeting process Education Resource Strategies 22 22
  • 23. ERS Resources: School Budget Hold ‘Em is more than a game … ... its an interactive exploration of the thoughtful trade-offs school administrators have to make in these challenging budget times.What is a Hold „Em Card? Category Class Size 2.0% Investment or Savings as % of Description of savings budget or investment option Explanation FYI: Additional informationEducation Resource Strategies 23 23
  • 24. How to play:The Object of the GameUse the Hold’em cards provided to create a “hand” of investment andsavings options to create a budget that moves toward improved districtperformance while still meeting a budget reduction target of 5%.Instructions Step 1 Assign Roles and Review Process (score keeper, task 5 min master, speaker for share-out) Step 2 Read: Quickly read through the sample deck and create 10 min piles for “yes,” “no,” or “maybe” for each option. Step 3 Review priorities and select your investments: As a group 15 min review the scenario and priorities presented and then identify the top investments you would like to include in your hand. Step 4 Finalize your hand: Identify new budget total and find 10 min savings to meet it.Education Resource Strategies 24
  • 25. Setting the ContextImagine you are the Superintendent of District X:Enrollment/Size: Mid-Large size district with recent enrollmentdeclinesBudget: Current gap is 8%; in fourth year of budget cuts – alreadycut central office and other operationsDemographics: 45% F&R, 15% Special Ed, 6% ELLStudent Performance: Low in reading/avg in Math – lowperformers concentrated at 25% of schoolsTeacher Comp: 90% of increases over base due to education/experienceTeacher PD: 4 staff days/year; 75 min daily prep; 45 mincollaborative planningTeacher Evaluation: Not historically rigorousEducation Resource Strategies 25
  • 26. Things to consider… Select cards carefully – not all the choices are strategic; larger hands mean more initiatives in place Consider inter-relationships – Not all choices are independent of each other. Some choices may reduce the value of other choices – you can choose one or the other or make a rough estimate of additional changes. Accept approximation – The budget percentages are estimates built from averages and including high-level assumptions. They are meant to be directionally correct, but actual district results could vary widely. Budget cutting in education means cutting staff positions – there will be pain, the question is whether there are ways to leverage it to accelerate the freeing of resources from unproductive structuresEducation Resource Strategies 26
  • 27. Discussion Questions1. What were the biggest insights and/or surprises regarding opportunities for district transformation during budget-cutting times?2. What particular investments or savings would be feasible or challenging in your state?3. What role can school boards, state legislators or other elected officials play to achieve desired investments and savings?4. What action will you take?Education Resource Strategies 27 27
  • 28. Take Action Play Hold‟em: holdem.erstools.org – Encourage your network to consider a new conversation around trade-offs – Facilitators’ Guide allows groups to play independently – Online version allows you to share your hand Use your role to advance reform – Change the debate over how to navigate tough times – Continue to advocate for changes in state laws that limit effective resource useEducation Resource Strategies 28 28
  • 29. Want to play again? 1. 1 Play using the complete deck with 60 cards 2. 2 Play online at holdem.erstools.org Please return the “mini-decks” to us!Education Resource Strategies 29 29
  • 30. Education Resource Strategies 30
  • 31. Please return the “mini-decks” to us!Education Resource Strategies 31

×