Global warming

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Global warming

  1. 1. ? If climate changes what might happen?
  2. 2. • The phrase "Global warming" or "Greenhouse warming" refers to the fact that as more carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases are added to the atmosphere, the temperature of the earth will rise, assuming nothing else changes. What is global warming? Play
  3. 3. For the past few hundred years, people have been burning fossil fuels such as coal and oil in ever increasing quantities. While some of the carbon dioxide released is absorbed into the ocean or taken up by plant life, in the short-term about half of it remains in the atmosphere. Industrial activities also have been releasing several other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
  4. 4. Climate is not weather • Weather is the condition of the atmosphere at a particular place and time measured in terms of such things as wind, temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, cloudiness, and precipitation etc. climate is the average pattern of weather in a place
  5. 5. The single human activity that is most likely to have a large impact on the climate is the burning of "fossil fuels" such as coal, oil and gas.
  6. 6. Major contributors to possible climate change: coal, oil, and natural gas, when burned release carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas
  7. 7. • Modest contributors to possible climate change: Deforestation: when wood is burned, the carbon contained in the trees is released as carbon dioxide. When wood rots in swamps methane can be produced. Living trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
  8. 8. • rice paddies, cattle, coal mines, gas pipelines, and landfills produce methane, another greenhouse gas, which today causes about 30% as much warming as carbon dioxide.
  9. 9. • fertilizers and other chemicals release nitrous oxide, which today causes about 10% as much warming as carbon dioxide.
  10. 10. Sea level rise and coastal storms Most of the rise in sea level would occur because water expands when it is heated. An increase in the earth's average temperature of about 3.5°F, which is probably too little to melt most polar ice, would result in an increase in sea level of between 8 and 30 inches
  11. 11. Plant migration: Climate may change faster than plants can move from one region to another. This may cause species extinction, lower biodiversity, and changes in the way species interact.
  12. 12. Changes in insect pests: Climate change can affect the number and kinds of pests directly. It can also affect them by changing the mix of plant varieties and their nutrient content. This can influence plant survival, food chains, and the spread of disease.
  13. 13. • The phrase "Global warming" or "Greenhouse warming" refers to the fact that as more carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases are added to the atmosphere, the temperature of the earth will rise, assuming nothing else changes. For the past few hundred years, people have been burning fossil fuels such as coal and oil in ever increasing quantities.
  14. 14. What can be done about climate change? Three basic strategies are available Abatement Adaptation Geo-Engineering
  15. 15. • Abatement: To abate means to slow or stop. Abatement strategies aim to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases that can cause climate change. They include improving energy efficiency, so that we burn less fuel, and using sources of energy that emit no greenhouse gases, such as solar or nuclear power.
  16. 16. • Adaptation: Under this strategy people find ways to live successfully with the changed climate. For example, land use may change. Aqueducts can be built to bring water into newly dry areas. Coastal populations can be protected from rising sea level by building dikes and sea walls, by relocating populations inland, and by protecting fresh-water supplies from salt-water intrusion. Teacher should discuss these points with students by giving examples
  17. 17. • Geo-Engineering: Geo means earth, so geo- engineering means to engineer the earth's atmosphere and oceans to reduce the amount of climate change. For example, the amount of sunlight that strikes the earth might be reduced by putting more small particles into the high atmosphere. The idea is to off-set the warming effect of more greenhouse gas by reflecting more sunlight back into space.
  18. 18. Things that an individual can do to reduce the chance of climate change: Most effective actions • When you buy a car, choose one that gets good mileage. • Insulate and weatherize your home or apartment. • Carpool or drive less. • Replace old, worn-out appliances (e.g., refrigerators, heat pumps) with the most efficient new models. If the average U.S. citizen undertakes all of these actions, they can reduce their carbon dioxide emissions by about 25%, which equals about 5 tons of carbon dioxide per year. Teacher should discuss these points with students by giving examples
  19. 19. Less effective, but helpful, actions. • Turn off lights and appliances when not needed. • Plant trees. • Set the thermostat lower in winter and higher in summer. • Recycle. Teacher should discuss these points with students by giving examples
  20. 20. • Ineffective actions. Using aerosol spray cans does not cause climate change. In the U.S., they no longer contain CFCs. • Individual actions that influence others. Become informed and help your family and friends to learn about climate change. Actively support the government policies you decide are most appropriate.
  21. 21. What might nations do? • Improve energy efficiency • Develop and use energy sources that emit little or no carbon dioxide • Improve forest and agricultural management practices • Reduce the impacts of climate change Teacher should discuss these points with students by giving examples
  22. 22. How can people decide for themselves what should be done about climate change? • the no abatement policy takes no immediate action on climate change or greenhouse gas emissions. • The goal of moderate abatement is to slow greenhouse gas emissions and give society more time to solve the problem. • Stringent abatement is the most ambitious climate change policy. By reducing total greenhouse gas emissions worldwide to 60% Teacher should discuss these points with students by giving examples
  23. 23. Common misconceptions about climate change: • Misconception: Climate change and the loss of the ozone layer are pretty much the same thing. Fact: Climate change and the loss of the ozone layer are two different problems that are not very closely connected.
  24. 24. • Misconception: Aerosol spray cans are a major contributor to climate change. Fact: Using aerosol spray cans has almost no effect on climate change. • Misconception: General pollution and toxic chemicals are major contributors to climate change. Fact: Most forms of pollution play little or no role in climate change. The invisible carbon dioxide released when coal, oil, and gas are burned is the single most important contributor to climate change.
  25. 25. • Misconception: Using nuclear power causes climate change. Fact: Nuclear power does not contribute to climate change. If nuclear power is used instead of coal or oil, it will reduce emissions of carbon dioxide. "Renewable energy" sources, such as solar power, can also reduce carbon dioxide emissions
  26. 26. The IPCC In 1988 The World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Program jointly established the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change or IPCC. The IPCC consists of a set of committees of leading scientists from all around the world whose task it is to periodically review and report on the state of understanding of the climate problem.

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