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Reports from Carbon Capture and Storage, Phenology and Teagasc Conferences; Round Up Session - EPA Climate Conference June 2010
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Reports from Carbon Capture and Storage, Phenology and Teagasc Conferences; Round Up Session - EPA Climate Conference June 2010

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    Reports from Carbon Capture and Storage, Phenology and Teagasc Conferences; Round Up Session - EPA Climate Conference June 2010 Reports from Carbon Capture and Storage, Phenology and Teagasc Conferences; Round Up Session - EPA Climate Conference June 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • CLIMATE CHANGEwww.epa.ie
      Research Programme
    • All-Island study
      Total quantified but unproven CO2 storage capacity of the Island of Ireland is 93000 Mt
      Total practical storage potential : 1,505 Mt CO2 hydrocarbon fields incl.
      Kinsale Head : 330 Mt
      East Irish Sea : 1050 Mt
      Total effective storage potential : 3.500 Mt
      Theoretical storage in Permo-Triassic aquifers, east coast and UK Irish Sea
      Unquantified potential in western basins
      (Spanish Point : 120 Mt)
      Ireland total emissions: 28.8Mt/year
      Moneypoint emissions : 5 Mt/year
    • CLIMATE CHANGEwww.epa.ie
      Research Programme
    • Phenology 2010; climate change impacts and adaptations
      Increasing temperature
      Trees’ response
      Advances in bud-burst and leafing dates
      Birds’ response
      Earlier arrival dates
    • Phenology
      What is phenology?
      Plant phenophases
      Leafing
      Flowering
      Leaf fall
      Bird phenophases
      Migration
      Egg-laying dates
      Why is phenology important in climate studies?
    • Leaf unfolding dates
    • Leaf unfolding dates
    • What the future holds for budburst in Betula pubescens
      Bridget O’Neill (TCD), Amelia Caffarra (Instituto Agrario, Trento, Italy), Emily Gleeson (Met Éireann)
    • Implications for whole ecosystem
      Oak tree
      Caterpillar
      Blue tit
    • Going forward……
      National Phenology Networks
      NPN - IE
      NPN - SW
      Nature’s Calendar
      Regional Phenology Networks
      PEP 725
      NPN - USA
      Global Phenology Network
      GEO
    • CLIMATE CHANGEwww.epa.ie
      Research Programme
    • A Climate for Change:opportunities for carbon-efficient farming
      Rogier Schulte, Reamonn Fealy, Mark Gibson, Gary Lanigan, Laurence Shalloo, Paul Crosson and Pat Murphy
    • A Climate for Change
      Agriculture and greenhouse gases: challenges and opportunities
      • Challenges:
      • Top-down carbon quota policies
      • Carbon leakage
      • Costs
      • Counting carbon ≠ cutting carbon
      • Opportunities:
      • Marketing low C-footprint food
      • Depends on actions from all relevant partners:
      • Teagasc- Government Departments- Agencies- Agri-food industry- Farmers and farm organisations
    • 40000.0
      35000.0
      30000.0
      25000.0
      Emissions (kt CO2eq)
      20000.0
      15000.0
      10000.0
      5000.0
      0.0
      1988
      1991
      1994
      1997
      2000
      2003
      2006
      Energy
      Transport
      Industrial Processes
      Agriculture
      Waste
      GHG emissions to date
      “In contrast to other sectors, Agriculture has already picked some of the “low hanging fruit” of mitigation; further reductions will become increasingly challenging”
    • Source: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Dairy Sector A Life Cycle Assessment, FAO, April 2010
      Approaches to further reductions
      Further reductions are required:
      • Caution: wrong approach may lead to carbon leakage Increase in global GHG emissions
    • Approaches to further reductions
      Further reductions are required:
      • Caution: wrong approach may lead to carbon leakage Increase in global GHG emissions
      • Solution to GHG  Food Security dilemma:Reduce C-footprint of produce, i.e. GHG emissions per kg product
      • Through increasing efficiency, instead of capping productivity
      • Already driven by food retail industry / consumer demand
      • Top-down policy push v. consumer pull: threat v. opportunity
    • Approaches to further reductions
      International coordination:
      • Currently, Ireland is locked into Kyoto
      • Caps total emissions per nation
      • Change from capping towards efficiencies requires major shift in global thinking and international coordination
      • New initiatives:
      • Worldwide: Global Research Alliance
      • EU: Joint Programme Initiative
      • Ireland (DAFF & Teagasc) have signed up to both initiatives
    • Farm management
      Soil / Animal
      Land-use
      N2O
      CH4
      CO2
      Teagasc GHG programme
      No room for complacency
      • Teagasc research programme on Greenhouse gases
      • €2.5m per annum, 6 Research Centres
      • Co-funded by DAFF (Stimulus), EPA (STRIVE)
      • Details presented at last week’s conference
      • Brought together by Teagasc Working Group on GHG emissions
      Denitrificationinhibitors
      N-efficiency
      Clover
      Genetic merit
      of animals
      Animal diet
      Forestation
      Min-till
      Farm energy use
      Energy crops
    • Teagasc GHG programme
      No room for complacency
      • Teagasc research programme on Greenhouse gases
      • €2.5m per annum, 6 Research Centres
      Teagasc Working Group on GHG emissions
      • Brings together all expertise from research and advisory
      • Developing coherent approach towards better GHG efficiencies
      • Fed into SEAI (McKinsey) report and government strategy
      • Identifying measures that are cost-effective
      “Cost-neutral”
      Buy-credits?
      “Double dividend”
      Source: Motherway & Walker, 2009www.seai.ie/Publications/Low_Carbon_Opportunity_Study
    • The way forward
      Reducing our C-footprint requires:
      • Research into cost-effective mitigation options (Teagasc, HEI’s)
      • Accounting for progress in inventories (EPA)
      • International policy development (DAFF, DoEHLG)
      • Changes in farm practices (Farmers and farm industry)
      • Full connectivity in supply chain (Processing industry)
      • Standardisation of C-footprinting (Food retail industry)
      Requires coherent approach
      Teagasc – FDII Climate for Change Action Forum
    • CLIMATE CHANGEwww.epa.ie
      Research Programme
    • Climate Solutions and Global Financing
      Global mitigation and developing country adaptation
      Hugely varying estimates of need
      Private finance crucial
      Depends on a carbon price
      Certainty on targets
      Public finance necessary partic for adaptation and CB
      Domestic Offsetting, as with CDM, faces challenges in incentivising and measuring REAL mitigation – MRV
      However! C Price not enough esp where market failures
      Regulation has a place
    • Climate Impacts and Adaptation
      High resolution decadinal simulations possible
      Rainfall shifts observed. Extreme rainfall magnitude is increasing – implications for planning and investment
      Role of boundary organisations; mainstreaming adaptation across institutions
      Multi-disciplinary approach
      Scenario building and visualisation tools
    • Resource Use and Mitigation
      Energy modelling is a useful tool – increasingly sophisticated
      Identifies options
      Clear we are not on target!
      Transport: Behavioural change is difficult
      Public perception
      Fiscal measures
      Land resources: Carbon store (peat) vulnerable but has potential
      Work needed at international level to bring that into accounting
      Alternative fuel vehicles: not appearing in energy models