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The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabids and associated biocontrol services.   O’Rourke, E.,1,2 Whelan, P.1,2 ...
The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabid and biocontrol services• Field research                          • Exp...
Predator biomass drives natural biological control                   O’Rourke, E.1, Kirwan, L.2, Cook, S.3, Murray, D.A.4,...
Justification for research•    Community functioning dependent on:1.   Identity effects2.   Diversity effects3.   Biomass ...
Hypotheses1. Predator diversity reduces pest survival rate more than   predator biomass.2. Interactions amongst predators ...
Meligethes aeneus (pollen beetle) – carabid –        winter oilseed rape complex   Carabid predator biocontrol  potential ...
Understanding the study system1. What is the impact of high and low pesticide management of   winter oilseed rape on:   a)...
Impact of high and low pesticide management of winter oilseed                            6                                ...
Species                   Mean (±se)       Mean number of                          abundance        larvae                ...
Simplex                                        Monoculture - 0, 1, 0                           Sp 2                       ...
The experimental layoutLow biomass - Monoculture                                            High biomass - MonocultureP. c...
Simplex predator-pest results• Increased predator diversity and biomass had a  positive effect on biocontrol expressed as ...
Simplex predator-pest results• All carabid monocultures caused a decline in pest survival rates.• Delivery of biocontrol s...
Simplex predator-pest results• Pest survival declined when P. melanarius and H. affinis  and P. cupreus and H. affinis wer...
Simplex predator-pest results• Pest survival rate was further reduced at higher biomass.• Identity and diversity effects a...
Conclusion• Carabid community biomass drives the reduction in pest  survival.• A lower level of pesticide management will:...
Thanks Prof Mark Emmerson & Dr Pádraig WhelanDr Sam Cook, Dr Darren Murray & Dr Laura Kirwan         Nigel Watts & Steve F...
Thank you for  listening.
Predator-pest interaction experimental design• Simplex design (Cornell 2002, Ramseier et al., 2005,  Sheehan et al., 2006,...
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The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabids and associated biocontrol services - Erin O'Rourke

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Transcript of "The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabids and associated biocontrol services - Erin O'Rourke"

  1. 1. The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabids and associated biocontrol services. O’Rourke, E.,1,2 Whelan, P.1,2 and Emmerson, M.3 1.Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. 2. School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. 3. School of Biological Sciences, Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland. SIMBIOSYS Final Conference Trinity College Dublin 28th June 2012 erinorourke@umail.ucc.ie
  2. 2. The impacts of bioenergy crop production on carabid and biocontrol services• Field research • Experimental research Examining the impact of annual &  Examining the role of carabids perennial bioenergy crop production in the provision of biocontrol on carabid diversity. services.
  3. 3. Predator biomass drives natural biological control O’Rourke, E.1, Kirwan, L.2, Cook, S.3, Murray, D.A.4, Whelan, P.M.1 & Emmerson, M.51. Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland & School of Biological,Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.2. Department of Computing, Mathematics & Physics, Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland.3. Department of AgroEcology Department, Rothamsted Research, England.4. VSN International LTD, 5 The Waterhouse, Waterhouse St, Hemel Hempstead HP1 1ES, England.5. School of Biological Sciences, Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.
  4. 4. Justification for research• Community functioning dependent on:1. Identity effects2. Diversity effects3. Biomass effects• Challenge to identify aspects of predator diversity most beneficial to prey suppression.• Need to understand the mechanisms of ecosystem functioning to allow for informed management.
  5. 5. Hypotheses1. Predator diversity reduces pest survival rate more than predator biomass.2. Interactions amongst predators lead to complementary use of prey resources.3. Predator identity effects and diversity effects remain consistent as predator biomass changes.
  6. 6. Meligethes aeneus (pollen beetle) – carabid – winter oilseed rape complex Carabid predator biocontrol potential exists when 2nd instarlarvae drop to the ground surface.
  7. 7. Understanding the study system1. What is the impact of high and low pesticide management of winter oilseed rape on: a) crop yield b) carabid species richness c) carabid abundance (Field study)2. What carabid species are most abundant at the time of pollen beetle larval drop to the soil surface? (Field study)3. Of the most abundant carabid species, which have the capacity to prey on the pest? (Laboratory feeding experiment)
  8. 8. Impact of high and low pesticide management of winter oilseed 6 12 100 90 5 10 80 Carabid species richness Crop Yield (tons per ha) 70 Carabid abundance 4 8 60 3 6 50 40 2 4 30 1 2 20 10 0 0 0 High Low High Low High Low• 58.68% reduction in carabid abundance in crops under high pesticide management.
  9. 9. Species Mean (±se) Mean number of abundance larvae killed (±se) in 2 hoursBembidion lampros 221.33 ± 25.11 0 (*)GeneralistInsectivorePoecilus cupreus 161.17 ± 27.04 9.14 ± 1.14GeneralistInsectivoreHarpalus affinis 131.17 ± 34.23 4.14 ± 0.77GranivorePterostichus melanarius 34.33 ± 9.46 18.14 ± 1.61GeneralistCarnivore
  10. 10. Simplex Monoculture - 0, 1, 0 Sp 2 Sp 2 Monoculture 100% of one species Binary mixture - 0.50, 0.50, 0 Binary mixture equal proportions of two species Centroid - 0.33, 0.33, 0.33 Centroid even proportions of three species Sp 1 BIOMASS 1 (Lower) Sp 3 Sp 1 BIOMASS 2 (Higher) Sp 3• 14 diversity treatments, at 2 carabid biomass levels.• 2 temporal time blocks incorporated.• Within each time block - 2 controls containing no carabids to account for natural mortality of larvae.
  11. 11. The experimental layoutLow biomass - Monoculture High biomass - MonocultureP. cupreus = 0.098g X 6 H. affinis = 0.051g X 24= 0.588g = 1.224g Response: proportion of larvae survivingLow biomass - Binary High biomass - Binary1 P. melanarius + 3 P. cupreus = 2 P. melanarius + 12 H. affinis =0.195g + 0.294g = 0.489g 0.39g + 0.612g = 1.002g
  12. 12. Simplex predator-pest results• Increased predator diversity and biomass had a positive effect on biocontrol expressed as a reduction of pest survival.• Biomass effect shown to play a greater role than the diversity effect in the delivery of service.
  13. 13. Simplex predator-pest results• All carabid monocultures caused a decline in pest survival rates.• Delivery of biocontrol services was greatest with respect to monocultures of P. cupreus. (A) Low Biomass (B) High Biomass 0.6 0.6Survival rate 0.4 Survival rate 0.4 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.2 1.00 H. affinis 0.2 1.00 H. affinisP. melanarius P. melanarius 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 P. cupreus P. cupreus
  14. 14. Simplex predator-pest results• Pest survival declined when P. melanarius and H. affinis and P. cupreus and H. affinis were combined in mixture - predatory facilitation.• Pest survival rate increased when P. melanarius and P. cupreus were combined in mixture - behavioural interference. (A) Low Biomass (B) High Biomass 0.6 0.6 Survival rate 0.4 Survival rate 0.4 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.2 1.00 H. affinis 0.2 1.00 H. affinis P. melanarius P. melanarius 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 P. cupreus P. cupreus
  15. 15. Simplex predator-pest results• Pest survival rate was further reduced at higher biomass.• Identity and diversity effects are shown to remain constant, irrespective of the level of predator biomass. (A) Low Biomass (B) High Biomass 0.6 0.6 Survival rate 0.4 Survival rate 0.4 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.2 1.00 H. affinis 0.2 1.00 H. affinis P. melanarius P. melanarius 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 P. cupreus P. cupreus
  16. 16. Conclusion• Carabid community biomass drives the reduction in pest survival.• A lower level of pesticide management will:1. Enhance carabid predator biomass.2. Improve the delivery of carabid biocontrol services.3. Not cause producer to suffer low crop yields.
  17. 17. Thanks Prof Mark Emmerson & Dr Pádraig WhelanDr Sam Cook, Dr Darren Murray & Dr Laura Kirwan Nigel Watts & Steve Freeman All the farmers/landowners Dr Roy Anderson (carabid pictures)
  18. 18. Thank you for listening.
  19. 19. Predator-pest interaction experimental design• Simplex design (Cornell 2002, Ramseier et al., 2005, Sheehan et al., 2006, Kirwan et al., 2007, 2009)• Allows the use monocultures and community mixtures of carabids at fixed levels of overall carabid biomass (low & high)
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