A Rio+20Toolkit Series :    Part II                       Our Future is Worth It:                   How YOUth can take ACT...
Design Your Future    IN THIS ISSUE   The Story of    Rio+20    pp. 1-5                         act local,   How you can...
The first Earth Summit     A timeline of         1992                           The Earth Summit was the first meeting of ...
The Earth Summit in 1992 was the catalyst for a lot of changes, including a greater use of the term “SustainableDevelopmen...
1992-2012: A snapshot of world challengesSince the 1992 Earth                                                A complicated...
The Rio+20 Outcome document     You have probably noticed that after every major UN conference, outcome     documents or p...
How you can have an impact on Rio+20                               Most children and youth will not be physically present ...
If you are attending the Rio+20 Conference:                              Young people that are attending the conference ar...
How do I influence Decision-Makers? An Introduction to LobbyingAdvocacy Vs Lobbying“Advocacy” involves influencing attitud...
Meeting Decision Makers                                   Top tips for lobbying face-to-face                              ...
Raise Awareness: How to Organize an Event           Sustainable development can sound like a boring term to young people. ...
Tips for Making Effective Presentations  Inspire! Give presentations that do more than simply provide information– do not...
Additional Online Resources     LEARN MORE ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY AND RIO+20!     I. Websites     Official Rio +20 Website  ...
LOBBYING      Millennium Development Goals Youth Action Guide (World Health Organisation –WHO)     This action guide was ...
THANK YOU!                        This completes the second section of our Rio+20 toolkit series. In part 3 of our series,...
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Part II: Our Future is Worth It: How YOUth can take ACTION for Sustainable Development

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Part II of a four part series for youth to take action for Sustainable Development.

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Part II: Our Future is Worth It: How YOUth can take ACTION for Sustainable Development

  1. 1. A Rio+20Toolkit Series : Part II Our Future is Worth It: How YOUth can take ACTION for Sustainable Development In partnership with:
  2. 2. Design Your Future IN THIS ISSUE The Story of Rio+20 pp. 1-5 act local, How you can have An Impact on Rio+20 think global! pp. 6-7 Introduction to “ As the young leaders of tomorrow, you have the passion and energy Lobbying and commitment to make a difference. What Id like to really urge you pp. 8-9 do is to have a global vision. Go beyond your country; go beyond your national boundaries." How to Organize "You have to work and think about how we can make this world a better an Event place for all. This is what Id really like to ask our young leaders. We will p. 10 try as leaders of today to minimise the problems which we will hand over to you. But it is to you. You have to take ownership and leadership Tips for Effective of tomorrow. For that to be possible, you have to strengthen your Presentations capacity and widen your vision as a global citizen." p. 11 UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon to the Young Atlanticist Summit Lisbon, Portugal, 20 November 2010 Online Resources pp. 12-13 Contacts p. 14 In part one of our toolkit series we mentioned that something big is happening in June: the Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development. What is significant in the lead up to Rio+20? The answer is YOU. YOU can share your voice with millions of youth around the world. YOU can appeal to your leaders to make change. YOU can take local actions. Small actions for sustainable development in the lead up to Rio+20, multiplied by millions of youth world-wide, can make a huge impact to design our future!1
  3. 3. The first Earth Summit A timeline of 1992 The Earth Summit was the first meeting of its kind: more than 17,000 people, events leading including 240 delegates and civil society organizations, gathered to discuss the up to Rio+20: creation of a sustainable future. 1972: UN Conference on the Human Environment 1992: UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio Earth Summit) 1994: Global Conference on the Sustainable Development of Small Island States 2002: UN International Conference on Financing for Development 2002: World Summit on Sustainable Development (Rio+10) 2005: UN Conference on Small Earth Summit 1992 also established the UN Commission on Sustainable Islands Development (CSD). The CSD monitors international treaties on the environment, 2012: UN Conference provides policy direction, and coordinates action within the United Nations on Sustainable system to achieve the goals of Agenda 21. Development (Rio+20) The CSD meets each year for negotiations and the Major Group of Children and Youth have participated in all of these meetings. To find out more about the con- tributions made by Children and Youth to these sessions check out theirLearn more about history: http://uncsdchildrenyouth.org/what-weve-done/these milestones forsustainabledevelopment in thenext few pages.2
  4. 4. The Earth Summit in 1992 was the catalyst for a lot of changes, including a greater use of the term “SustainableDevelopment” in politics, as well as a greater feeling of urgency that humans should act to protect the planet. 2002: Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development (Rio+10)10 years after Earth Summit 1992, came the Rio+10 Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa,which produced a follow-up document to Agenda 21, called the Johannesburg Plan ofImplementation (JPOI). This document focuses on operational steps to ensure:  Poverty Eradication  Changing unsustainable patterns of consumption and production  Protecting the natural resource baseFun Fact: The 2002 conference is called Rio+10 because it happened 10 years after the original Earth Summit,whereas the 2012 conference is called Rio+20 because it is happening 20 years after the original Earth Summit. 2012: UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20)From 20-22 June 2012 the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) will take place in Rio de Janeiro,Brazil. The Conference will be focused on:  Objectives  The Green Economy in the context of Poverty Eradication and Sustainable Development  Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development (Governance)The process: Several important steps have led the way to this important conference. Check out the diagram below!3
  5. 5. 1992-2012: A snapshot of world challengesSince the 1992 Earth A complicated picture of good things….Summit a lot of things and some bad things….have happened.Sustainable In 20 years:Development has  The population has gone up by 26%:become more (1.4 billion people!)prominent on the  GDP has gone up by 75%, but this economicpolitical agenda and growth does not reflect the huge, and growing,more people have inequalities, between “the global North” and thestarted talking about “global South”, OR the massive cost to theit. Issues such as planet in terms of resource overexploitation andclimate change, ecosystem degradation.global warming and  Over 3500 million people live in urban areas, but thegrowing social number of slum dwellers has gone up to 827 millioninequality have  Food production has gone up by 45% but the numbercreated a sense of of people who suffer from hunger in the world isglobal urgency. about 925 million (almost 1/7 of the world’s popula- tion)Despite this urgency,the political will to  The ozone layer hole has been restored but the tem- perature of the earth has gone up by o.4 degreesfollow up on agreed Celsius, while the oceans record an increase inactions has been temperature to 0.5 degrees Celsius above the average, and an increase in sea-limited. 20 years after levels of about 2.5 mm per year.the Rio Earth Summit  Carbon parts per million in the atmosphere have gone from 357 ppmv to 389progress has been ppmv; the use of fossil fuels has increased due to growing demand, especiallymade, but there still from developing countries such as India and Chinaremains a lot to beachieved. Addressing  We have lost 300 million hectares of forest since 1990 (that’s about the size of Argentina), or about 16 million hectares of forest (contributing to about 12-15% ofthese issues is of global warming).global importance.4
  6. 6. The Rio+20 Outcome document You have probably noticed that after every major UN conference, outcome documents or plans are released. These are plans of action aimed at guiding the national policies of member states to achieve sustainable development. These recommendations affect non profits, non governmental organizations and individuals like you, also known as civil society. An outcome document is also expected to come out of the Rio+20 conference. This document is known as the Zero Draft. The Zero Draft is expected to build upon the impact of previous agreements like Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (Rio+10). And now the Zero Draft The Zero Draft gathered proposals from governments, international and regional organisations, as well as stakeholders that include youth voices via the UN CSD Major Group of Children and Youth. To see what proposals were submitted on behalf of Children and Youth, go to: http://bit.ly/mgcyzerodraft If you are interested in finding out what your country submitted to the Zero Draft, use this handy tool from the official conference website: http://bit.ly/zerodraftsubmissions The Concerns with the Zero Draft The Zero Draft proposals have been criticised for not being ambitious enough. The document as it stands does not put enough pressure on governments to ensure past agreements are adhered to. The Zero Draft also fails to incorpo- rate enough measures to protect developing nations and island states at the same rate of lessening consumption practices of developed ones. Read the official Zero Draft and compare it to the one submitted on behalf of children and youth. What goals are missing? Once you have identified areas of the Zero Draft that need strengthening, you can then raise awareness and take action!5
  7. 7. How you can have an impact on Rio+20 Most children and youth will not be physically present during the Rio+20 conference. Here is how you can still participate in the process. From YOUR AREA Raise awareness!  Keep up to date with news about Rio+20 and share this information within your community.  Organize a gathering where people can discuss the issues and create a community action plan.  Create a viral video or design Rio+20 art.  Coordinate a peaceful demonstration. Make sure to stay safe and follow the appropriate laws in your country. The outcomes of Rio+20 must be implemented with all members of civil soci- ety, including people from communities just like yours. The examples above are local actions that can help you make Rio+20 relevant for your community and draw the attention of decision makers. You can also support youth activists attending Rio+20  Help youth inside and outside of the conference with planning and co-ordination. Youth delegates will need your help and ideas to ensure “Participation comes in children and youth have a greater impact in the decision making process. many forms, and you can take on different  Search for youth-led conversations within online platforms such as roles when engaging websites, mailing lists and social media to engage with other youth activists. into the process.  Commit to putting governments under pressure to reach positive outcomes Everyone’s during Rio+20. participation is  Follow up with your government to make sure they stick to commitments valuable because we all after Rio+20. contribute in different ways based on our Be prepared, gather friends with whom you can work and take actions, and interests and capacity.” above all, BE BRAVE! Gather friends and family with you to work together and take action. (Rio+Twenties You can do it! Participation Guide)6
  8. 8. If you are attending the Rio+20 Conference: Young people that are attending the conference are accredited by either a Non Governmental Organization (NGO), as part of the press, or as an official Youth Delegate representing their country. There are many ways children and youth can influence the process while attending the conference. Youth can lobby delegates to strengthen the policy measures and make the negotiation process more accountable to children and youth. Here are some tactics that youth have be able to use in past negotiations :  Tracking the negotiations  Corridor lobbying  Participating in workshops  Holding side events  Oral interventions If you are in Brazil but not at the conference Come to the MGCY Youth Blast (Conference of Youth)! Over 2000 young people are expected to attend the Youth Blast scheduled for 7-12 June 2012 in Rio de Janeiro. The three aims of the Youth Blast are:  Build capacity amongst young people to effectively participate in the formal and informal processes of Rio+20  Strategise for MGCY engagement in the official process of Rio+20  Plan for a post-Rio+20 agenda that incorporates the implementation of the outcomes of Rio+20 For more information about the Youth Blast go to: http://uncsdchildrenyouth.org/rio20/youth-blast/ Whether at home or at the conference, you can lobby decision-makers for sustainable development practices that will make the outcomes of Rio+20 work in reality.7
  9. 9. How do I influence Decision-Makers? An Introduction to LobbyingAdvocacy Vs Lobbying“Advocacy” involves influencing attitudes or opinions on a specific issue or cause.“Lobbying” is slightly different- it usually involves asking for a specific ACTION to be taken, often by a government.To do this, you will need to influence decision makers - the people/person with responsibility for the thing youwant to change.Decision makers usually work at one of these 4 levels: STEP 1: CHOOSING AN ISSUE  Ask yourself: “Why do I care about this issue??”  Write or draw a few notes about the issue and why it matters to you, your group and young people. If this problem were solved, who would it help? Why ?  Decision makers often focus on the “Big Picture”...Issues that affect everyone  Health, Education, the Economy (Money), Peace and Security are likely to be priorities. STEP 2: FIND OUT WHO THE DECISION MAKERS ARE!  Find out who is in charge of decisions on this specific issue if you can. Use the internet, the local directory or by locating offices of decision makers and asking in person or writing a letter.  When thinking about WHO to contact, try to think back to the levels of decision makers (above) and who has the biggest influence. STEP 3: DECIDE HOW YOU WILL CONTACT THEM  Write a letter or email (1 page is enough). Send a petition (ask them to change something, and get other people to sign their name too).  Arrange to meet with them to discuss the issue (if possible with other people who support your idea)  Call them - if you can get their office telephone number, get a lot of people (your friends, your entire class/school/youth group) to call in and speak with the decision maker at a specific time, or leave a message to share their opinions on the issue.8
  10. 10. Meeting Decision Makers Top tips for lobbying face-to-face  Work together with others who care about the issue. Form a group and share ideas.  Contact other organisations/people who are working on the is- sue in your area.  Keep your messages short and simple: make a few key points to give them ideas on how to solve the issue. Try not to criticise what they have already done, but suggest ways to improve through specific actions.  Make it personal: policy makers are more likely to remember letters and visits that include personal experiences. Briefly describe a personal experience that shows why YOU care about the issue. How does sustainable development affect young people in the community/country?  Be creative! You can use art, music or photography to get your message across. Consider making a giant piece of art with a message on it or send a video message (keep it short).  Be specific: What do you want them to do? If you want a vote, information, answers to a question, or a signature on a petition, make it clear and ask if they will agree to do it.  Always give them your contact details so they can let you know when/if they have done what you have asked. If you are lucky enough to meet with a decision maker, remember lobbying is like a conversation...9
  11. 11. Raise Awareness: How to Organize an Event Sustainable development can sound like a boring term to young people. One of the ways you can encourage others to discuss and practice sustainability is by making the terms and issues youth-friendly. Events can be anything from fun activities within local communities, to a more high profile event with television personalities and media presence. Games, art (painting murals, drawing an activism tree, music shows) or simple discussion groups are a good way to bring people together under a theme. You can raise awareness by hosting events and giving presentations! Break down the ideas, present the facts and inspire people to join you. Some things to consider:10
  12. 12. Tips for Making Effective Presentations  Inspire! Give presentations that do more than simply provide information– do not only present facts about sustainable development. You want them to feel concerned and connected as well as encouraged to voice what they really want.  Outline! Provide the outline of your presentation so it becomes easy for the audience to follow. Stick to 2-3 main points to help focus your audience.  Consistency! Identify a theme and make it consistent throughout the presentation. Be clear on what you want to achieve. Introduce the audience to your reasons for giving this presentation and what you expect from them.  Keep it simple and make it a show! Try to use visual aids such a slides or props wherever possible, but don’t overdo it. Use simple language – you don’t want to confuse your audience.  Enthusiasm! Be passionate and amaze the audience. It is important that you believe what you are saying to convince them. Have confidence and show that you have no statements, especially if you want to reach an agreement. Make your presentation like a show with conviction!  Facts and figures! Shocking statistics often make people reflect, but should be used responsibly. For example, compare the amount of food wasted in rich countries (220 million metric tonnes) to the same total amount of food produced in Sub-Saharan Africa.11
  13. 13. Additional Online Resources LEARN MORE ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY AND RIO+20! I. Websites Official Rio +20 Website http://www.uncsd2012.org/rio20/index.html Planetpals (free games, activities and more!) http://www.planetpals.com/ Young Scot (Scottish Youth Information for 11-26 year olds): Sustainability http://www.youngscot.org/info/670-sustainability EchoEarth.Info Environment Portal and Search Engine http://www.ecoearth.info/links/Sustainability/Information/For_Kids/welcome.asp Waste Free Lunches (tools to create change!) http://www.wastefreelunches.org/Resources.html - For schools K-12 http://www.informinc.org/getatlunch.php - For colleges and universities II. Organizations Youth Entrepreneurship and Sustainability (YES) http://www.yesweb.org/ WiserEarth http://wiserearth.org/ Green Assembly http://www.greenassembly.net/ III. Other helpful toolkits and media Human Impacts Institute MobilizeUS! toolkit for Rio+20 http://www.humanimpactsinstitute.org/Resources%20Rio+20/HII%20Toolkit%20Items/MobilizeUS! FAQ.pdf Youth Roc Toolkit for Youth on how to build a Sustainability Youth Council http://youth.reroc.com.au/content/sustainability-toolkit UNICEF Youth Community Mapping Toolkit for those who want to spark conversation in their community around sustainable development. http://futurewewant.wordpress.com/toolkit-eng/mapping-toolkit/ TakingITGlobal Sustainability Youth Leadership Toolkit http://www.tigweb.org/resources/toolkits/view.html?ToolkitID=2757 YOUTH PARTICIPATION Rio+twenties Participation Guide: For more information on how children and youth can participate and influence global decision-makers http://rioplustwenties.org/?page_id=97012
  14. 14. LOBBYING  Millennium Development Goals Youth Action Guide (World Health Organisation –WHO) This action guide was created by young people, to give anyone who wants to make the world a better place everything they need to start a campaign, or link up with movements already happening in their country. It includes information on how to plan and carry out an activity or campaign to tell others about the Millennium Development Goals: http://www.who.int/pmnch/topics/mdgs/youthactionguide/en/index.html  PLAN International: Capacity Development for Youth Groups – Advocacy Training Guide An introduction to advocacy for people who work with children, in 8 simple chapters, developed jointly by Plan and development partners in Togo. http://plan-international.org/where-we-work/africa/publications/advocacy-capacity- development-for-youth-groups-training-guide  [USA] Youthrights.net This is a youth lobbying guide designed to help young people become successful advocates for policy change regarding youth rights at the local, state and national governmental levels. http://www.youthrights.net/index.php?title=Youth_Lobbying_Guide  [UK] British Youth Council Youth Guides: These guides are most relevant to the UK and Europe. How -To Guides in- clude : Lobbying, Campaigning, Running an Organisation. http://www.byc.org.uk/resource-centre/how-to-guides.aspx  [USA] Advocates For Youth.org: Tips for Lobbying on sexual and reproductive health specifically.. Includes: Lobbying, Using the Media, Direct Action, Building Coalitions... http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/tips-for-advocates-sercadv Download the Youth Advocacy Kit: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/advocacykit.pdf  [Texas Network of Youth Services (TNOYS) - Youth In Action Advocacy Guide [USA] This guide offers a few tricks of the trade to help make advocating for your causes a little easier. Take this guide back to your home and continue advocating for change at a local level. http://www.tnoys.org/youth/WeWantChangeGuide.pdf  UK Christian Aid – How to Lobby This is a guide to lobbying success - how to put your case forward and make good things happen! http://www.christianaid.org.uk/ActNow/usefulstuff/how_to_lobby.aspx?Page=1 Other guides from Christian Aid: How to organise an event, How to speak in public , How to write a press release , How to produce a leaflet  World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) - Advocacy Guide Supporting and encouraging young people to speak out, educate,and take action http://www.wagggsworld.org/en/ resources/document/view/3384 Also from WAGGGS - Campaign and advocacy tools http://www.wagggsworld.org/en/resources/ campaignandadvocacytools PRESENTATIONS How to stage an event: http://www.ehow.com/how_2246624_organize-community-events-raise-awareness.html How to tell a story: NPRs Scott Simon shares his experience and wisdom to help you with your own storytelling skills: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiX_WNdJu6w How to overcome speech anxiety: http://www.howcast.com/videos/174024-How-To-Overcome-Speech-Anxiety:// How to give presentations like Steve Jobs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-ntLGOyHw413
  15. 15. THANK YOU! This completes the second section of our Rio+20 toolkit series. In part 3 of our series, find out about a concept that relates to Rio+20 known as the green economy, how to use media, additional activities you can take for sustainable development and more! CONTACT US! If you are interested in getting involved, taking action, or simply knowing more about what we’re doing, feel free to contact any of us for more information: MAJOR GROUP FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH Website: http://uncsdchildrenyouth.org/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/UNCSDYouthCaucus Twitter: @MGCY_UNCSD EARTH CHARTER INTERNATIONAL Website: http://www.earthcharterinaction.org/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EarthCharter Twitter: @earthcharter EOTO WORLD Website: http://www.eotoworld.org/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EOTOWorld Twitter: @EOTOWorld Thanks and acknowledgements Authors: Barkha Mossae (Mauritius), Sasha Pratt ( UK), Neringa Miliauskaite (Lithuania), Elischia Fludd(USA) and Nora Mahmoud (Costa Rica/USA). Photo Credits: Oliver Rieche, Cynthia Keza and Vietnam Jump and Kyle Kaianaupuni Robertson.14

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