SFMTAEN TRIPS Corridor Screening andRecommendations                           May 2011
Table of Contents                                                                                                         ...
Executive SummaryThe Eastern Neighborhoods Transportation Implementation Planning Study (EN TRIPS) isidentifying and devel...
EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendationswhich ...
We noted street segments that stood out from the others based on high rates of pedestrian andbicycle collisions: in partic...
EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and RecommendationsTownse...
highest rates of bicycle collisions in the study area, despite not being a designated bicycle route.In addition to a high ...
EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and RecommendationsUS 101...
The analysis found that all of the study roadways in the vicinity of Third and Fourth Streets areforecast to be either at ...
EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendations     ...
Next Steps. Next steps for the EN TRIPS project will be as follows:   1.   Select final project corridors. (May 2011)   2....
IntroductionThe Eastern Neighborhoods Transportation Implementation Planning Study (EN TRIPS) isidentifying and developing...
MethodologyTo determine which street segments in the study area should be the focus of near-term corridorimprovement proje...
EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendationsstreet...
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
Task 3.a:  Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors
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Transcript of "Task 3.a: Inventory of Key Eastern Neighborhood Priority Corridors"

  1. 1. SFMTAEN TRIPS Corridor Screening andRecommendations May 2011
  2. 2. Table of Contents PageExecutive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 10 Methodology ............................................................................................................................. 11 Recommendations ................................................................................................................... 42 Next Steps ................................................................................................................................. 46Appendix A. EN TRIPS Preliminary Corridor Screening - Indicators of Need by ModeAppendix B. EN TRIPS Preliminary Corridor Screening - Indicators of Need by ModeTable of FiguresFigure 1  Eastern Neighborhood Modal Networks ............................................................. 13 Figure 2  South of Market Area Corridor Segments ........................................................... 14 Figure 3  Mission, Potrero Hill/Showplace Square, and Central Waterfront Corridor Segments......................................................... 15 Figure 4  High Growth Corridor Segments – South of Market Area ................................... 16 Figure 5  High Growth Corridor Segments - Mission, Potrero Hill/ Showplace Square, and Central Waterfront........................................................ 17 Figure 6  Growth Score by Eastern Neighborhoods Corridor Segment – South of Market ................................................................................................... 18 Figure 7  Growth Score by Eastern Neighborhoods Corridor Segment – Mission, Potrero Hill/Showplace Square, and Central Waterfront ....................... 19 Figure 8  Modal Need Score for Eastern Neighborhoods High Multimodal Need’ Segments ....................................................................... 23 Figure 9  Modal Need Score by Eastern Neighborhoods Corridor Segment – South of Market .................................................................. 25 Figure 10  Modal Need Score by Eastern Neighborhoods Corridor Segment – Mission, Potrero Hill/Showplace Square, and Central Waterfront ....................... 26 Figure 11  Pedestrian and Bicycle Collisions on South of Market North-South Streets (2004 – 2008) ..................................................................... 28 Figure 12  Pedestrian and Bicycle Collisions on South of Market North-South Streets (2004 – 2008) ..................................................................... 28 Figure 13  PM Period Max Transit Load (Projected 2035) ................................................... 29 Figure 14  Areas with ¼ Mile of TEP Rapid Route ............................................................... 30 Figure 15  Forecast Volume/Capacity for North-South Corridors (2035) ............................. 37 Figure 14  Forecast Volume/Capacity for North-South Corridors (2035) ............................. 37 Figure 16  Forecast Volume/Capacity for South of Market Screenlines ............................... 39 Figure 17  Forecast Volume/Capacity for South of Market Screenlines (north-south corridors)......................................................................................... 40 Figure 17  Forecast Volume/Capacity for South of Market Screenlines (east-west corridors) ........................................................................................... 41  i
  3. 3. Executive SummaryThe Eastern Neighborhoods Transportation Implementation Planning Study (EN TRIPS) isidentifying and developing transportation infrastructure improvements to serve the needs of SanFrancisco’s Eastern Neighborhoods, as envisioned by the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans.To ensure that EN TRIPS resources are focused on places that would benefit most, the currentphase of the study has screened and prioritized transportation needs in the large study area bystreet segment. Using this technique, combined with input from the public, the study team haschosen a small number of street segments to recommend for near-term corridor improvementprojects. The aim of these projects is that they will not only address a specific transportation issuein the study area, but will also work to develop a solution for problems that occur widelythroughout the study area. In addition, the project will investigate ways to mitigate recurringtransportation challenges in the study area through existing SFMTA projects and programs.The recommended segments not only have major local transportation challenges, but they playimportant roles in the overall Eastern Neighborhoods circulation system. Making these segmentswork better is key to meeting the explicit goals of the Eastern Neighborhoods Planning process.They make up important parts of the corridors that knit these diverse neighborhoods together;they will bear the burden of a significant share of the growth forecast to occur as a result of theEastern Neighborhoods; and they are the focus of community interest as expressed through theEastern Neighborhoods Community Planning Process, the EN TRIPS outreach workshop, andrelated planning processes.This report explains the method that the EN TRIPS team used to rank and prioritize streetsegments, and recommends projects that should be carried through for design andimplementation. These recommendations will be reviewed by the Eastern NeighborhoodsCitizens Advisory Committee before the SFMTA makes a final determination of priority corridorsegments for improvement. The method is summarized below.Step 1. Divide the major transportation corridors in the study area intofunctional segments.The study considered for near-term corridor improvement projects only those streets that are partof one of the city’s modal transportation networks as designated through existing City policy.These networks are: the vehicular network (San Francisco General Plan); truck routes (SFMTArecommended Truck Routes); bicycle network (San Francisco Bicycle Plan); transit prioritystreets (SFMTA Transit Effectiveness Project).The streets that belong to one or more of these networks were then divided into segments thathave a cohesive character and function. To divide segments, the study team considered modalpriorities (for example, some segments of a particular street have transit service, while others donot), directionality (for example, transitions from one-way to two-way operations), and consistency( we have tried to break street segments for adjacent and parallel streets at roughly the samepoint in order to maintain consistency across segments).The outcome of this balance of priorities is as follows: In the South of Market (SOMA) area, mostof the east-west streets (Mission through Brannan) have been divided into three parts: aTransbay/Financial District segment from the Embarcadero to either Second or Third street,where the streets have mostly two-way operations; a short mid-market segment where the streetsshift to one-way operations (roughly between Third and Fifth streets); and a longer WesternSouth of Market segment, stretching roughly from Fifth Street to Division Street. King Street, 1
  4. 4. EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendationswhich is much shorter, has been assessed as a single segment. Outside of the South of Marketarea, most of the north-south streets are divided at 16th Street. Most of the east-west streets havebeen divided at Potrero Avenue. In Potrero Hill, the analysis considers the full length of any streetthat has transit service. In some cases, breaks between segments were redefined in later phasesof the evaluation.Step 2. Assess which corridors fall in high growth areas.Next, each corridor segment was ranked based on forecast growth in residential and employmentdensity by 2035. For each corridor segment, the average increase in employment (jobs persquare acre) and population (persons per square acre) was calculated for the land next to thecorridor segment. The resulting values were then ranked and grouped in to quartiles. The quartilescores for population and for employment growth were then added together, to give an overallgrowth score between 2 and 8.Step 3. Score each corridor segment based on the need for bicycle,pedestrian, and transit improvements.The project team developed a set of transportation performance measures, which were used torank the corridor segments and to identify high multimodal needs segments. These measureswere grouped by mode of transportation, and included measures related to need for bicycle,pedestrian, and transit improvements. While vehicle circulation need was not considered as astand-alone category, several measures were included related to vehicles, including vehiclevolume and vehicle delay.1For each mode of transportation, four performance measures were chosen. Each measure wasgiven a normalized “score” of 1-4, where a score of 4 represents the greatest need forimprovement and 1 represents the lowest need, compared with the other segments in the studyarea. The four normalized scores for each mode were then added together and normalized againby mode, and then added together to reach an overall multimodal need score. This techniquemakes it possible to equitably assess transportation need using a range of variables that are eachmeasured differently. The performance criteria are:  Transit Score: Transit Priority Category (based on TEP); Forecast PM transit volume; Forecast transit capacity constraint; Traffic delay.  Pedestrian Score: Pedestrian priority category (based on zoning); pedestrian injury collisions 2004 – 2008; forecast residential density; number of existing pedestrian facilities below city standards (including sidewalk width, closed crosswalks and multiple turn lanes, distance between crossings).  Bicycle Score: Bicycle Priority Category (based on SF Bike plan); Bicycle collisions 2004 – 2008; completeness of proposed bicycle facilities; Forecast PM vehicle volume.Step 4. Assess outliers that may represent special opportunities.Steps 1-3 prioritized streets that have significant needs across multiple measures. In Step 4, wegave special attention to those street segments that stand out because they have a particularlyurgent need in just one performance measure.1 Most of the quantitative data for this evaluation was drawn from the city’s travel demand model, SF CHAMP 4.1(ABAG projections 2009), which provided estimates of present vehicle and transit conditions, as well as forecasts for2035. Detailed analysis of vehicle travel in the South of Market area and on 16th Street was performed by the ENTRIPS study team through the South of Market Circulation Study. 2
  5. 5. We noted street segments that stood out from the others based on high rates of pedestrian andbicycle collisions: in particular, the northern segment of Sixth Street has far more pedestriancollisions than any other segment in this analysis.We also noted street segments that had great need in the areas of transit service and transitcapacity. Several Muni routes in the study area are forecast to have ridership demands that farexceed the available vehicle capacity during the PM peak period, including the T-Third (both onthe surface in Mission Bay and in the Central Subway); the 47 Van Ness Mission (on the northernMission District segment of Mission Street); the 9 San Bruno (in the northern segment of PotreroAvenue); and the 22 Fillmore (in the Mission District segment of 16th Street). Of these, the 22Fillmore is of particular concern because of its role linking several neighborhoods wheresignificant growth is forecast.Step 5. Of the ‘high growth,’ ‘high need’, and ‘outlier’ corridor segments,identify candidates that best fit into the EN TRIPS proejct timeframe.Through steps 1-4, a group of street segments was identified as falling in high growth areas,having high needs for more than one mode of transportation, or have especially high needs in atleast one mode. Of these identified segments, some may present better opportunities than othersfor near-term corridor improvement projects through EN TRIPS. This section further narrowscandidate corridors by identifying segments that are either being studied elsewhere, haveimmediate needs that can be addressed outside of this study process or have major unknownsthat make studying them further not practical.Mission Street - Third Street to Fifth Street. The middle segment of Mission Street has a veryimportant overall circulation function, and important localized needs (particularly for pedestrians).It is a vital east-west transit corridor through the South of Market, as well as a busy pedestriancorridor with relatively long distances between crossings, multiple turn lanes at the intersection ofFourth Street, and high rates of pedestrian injury collisions between 2004 and 2008. Potentialimprovement projects could include investment in pedestrian facilities, as well as transit prioritytreatments. The Better Market Street plan will consider the function of Mission Street in the Southof Market circulation system, and its relationship to Market Street. Because of this plannedanalysis, a near-term design project on Mission Street is not advisable for the EN TRIPS projectdespite the identified needs and opportunities.Folsom Street - Third Street to Eleventh Street. Two segments of Folsom Street have beenidentified as having high multimodal needs: Folsom between Second and Fifth, and between Fifthand Eleventh. Both segments have substandard pedestrian facilities, such as long distancesbetween crossings and multiple turn lanes. Folsom also has relatively high pedestrian injurycollision rates between 2004 and 2008. Forecast growth suggests that overall pedestrian volumescould be expected to rise along the full length of Folsom Street. The Folsom and Howard Streetcouplet form the major east-west bicycle corridor through the South of Market, and the forecastincrease in vehicle volumes may challenge cyclists in this corridor. Folsom Street was alsoidentified as a high-need corridor in the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans and the WesternSOMA Community Plan. Folsom Street is a strong candidate for near term improvements, withpotential for upgraded pedestrian facilities, improved bicycle facilities, traffic calming and/or aroad diet, and potential vehicle circulation changes such as conversion to two-way operations.Townsend Street - Third Street to Fifth Street. Currently, Townsend Street has inadequatepedestrian infrastructure. The north side of the street does not have sidewalks, while thesidewalks on the south side of the street are very narrow and impeded by parked vehicles,especially the motorcycle parking area adjacent to the Caltrain station. While improvements to 3
  6. 6. EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and RecommendationsTownsend Street are necessary, the corridor is receiving additional attention as part of projectsrelated to the implementation of high-speed rail and the upgrades planned for the site of thecurrent Caltrain station on the south side of Townsend west of Fourth. Any additionalimprovements to Townsend Street are contingent on final design of the high-speed rail station,which is not likely to be completed in the near term. Furthermore, improvements to Townsendcould be made as part of station construction. For these reasons, a design project for TownsendStreet may be premature as part of the EN TRIPS project.Second Street - Market Street to Bryant Street. While pedestrian conditions along SecondStreet are not as challenging as along some other SOMA streets, it is zoned commercial andsuffered from a relatively high pedestrian injury collision rate of 35 per mile between 2004 and2008. Second Street is also the primary bicycle route between the Financial District, Rincon Hilland South Beach. Bicycle lanes have been planned here, but deferred out of deference tocommunity concerns. Second Street also has extremely high forecast growth. While high growthmakes Second Street a high priority for investment, this corridor has numerous improvementsplanned as part of the Transbay Transit Center District plan, developed by the San FranciscoPlanning Department’s City Design group. Given the attention already invested, Second Street isprobably not a strong candidate for further near-term investment through the EN TRIPS project.Third and Fourth Street - Market Street to Bryant Street. Third and Fourth Streets, which forma one-way couplet in the eastern South of Market area, have inadequate pedestrian facilities,high rates of growth, and important roles for three modes of transportation (transit, pedestrians,and vehicles). Both streets are important pedestrian pathways between Market Street and theCaltrain station at Fourth and King Streets, and both have high pedestrian injury collision rates.Pedestrian facilities are inadequate, with narrow sidewalks, long crossings, and restrictedcrossings at several intersections. Third and Fourth Streets also work together as a crucial transitcorridor, with significant challenges. A major investment in transit service is already underway inthis corridor, in the form of the Muni Central Subway under Fourth Street. However, even with thisinvestment, the T-Third light rail service is forecast to be over-capacity by 2035. Currently, thespeed and reliability of 30 and 45 are poor, and forecast traffic congestion at on Third and FourthStreets could further degrade performance. Because of these challenges, both streets are strongcandidates for near term improvement. Fourth Street will very likely be the subject of a streetdesign effort by the San Francisco Planning Department in the near future, as part of a plannedrezoning associated with the construction of the Central Subway.Fifth Street - Market Street to Brannan Street. Fifth Street is a two-way arterial that servesmultiple roles in South of Market Street network. It is an important corridor for cyclists, connectingthe Union Square area to Caltrain and Mission Bay. Bike lanes are planned on Fifth, but have notyet been built. Between 2004 and 2008, the bicycle collision rate here was 39 per mile, amongthe highest in the evaluation. Fifth Street also has high pedestrian needs, with long crossingdistances, multiple turn lanes at Bryant, a restricted crosswalk at Harrison, and narrow sidewalks.Fifth Street north of Brannan is also an important transit street, with Muni’s route 27 planned tooperate in this segment. Fifth Street is a strong candidate for near-term improvement through theEN TRIPS project, particularly if the project wishes to provide a design template for a two-waySOMA arterial.Sixth Street - Market Street to Brannan Street. Sixth Street is another two-way arterial with ahigh need for improvements. While it carries large volumes of fast-moving traffic, particularlytraffic traveling between the Interstate 280 exit ramp and the north-of market street network, SixthStreet also has high residential density and serves large numbers of pedestrians. The greatestchallenge on Sixth Street is a pedestrian injury collision rate between 2004 and 2008 of 97 permile, by far the highest among any of the segments analyzed. Sixth Street also has one of the 4
  7. 7. highest rates of bicycle collisions in the study area, despite not being a designated bicycle route.In addition to a high collision rate, Sixth Street suffers from long crossing distances, multiple turnlanes at two intersections, narrow sidewalks, high forecast traffic volume, and numerousintersections with alleys where mid-block crossings are not provided. Because of these factors,Sixth Street is a candidate for near-term. However, because the primary issue with Sixth Street isa single factor (a high rate of pedestrian injury collisions) that is not directly related to larger ENTRIPS system goals, such as addressing growth and connecting EN TRIPS neighborhoods, SixthStreet may be more suitable for a very short term focus by SFMTA on operational issues toaddress pedestrian collisions.Seventh and Eighth Streets - Market Street to Brannan Street. Seventh and Eighth Streetsform a one-way couplet running north and south through the Western South of Market. Thenorthern segment of both of these streets emerged as high priority in the corridor screeninganalysis, based primarily on high pedestrian and bicycle needs, and relatively high projectedrates of growth. Seventh and Eighth have inadequate pedestrian facilities, including narrowsidewalks and restricted crossings, and high rates of pedestrian collisions comparable to othernorth-south SOMA arterials. Forecast traffic conditions would degrade conditions for cyclists inthe bicycle lanes on Seventh and Eighth, which together make up a key north-south link forcyclists between Potrero Hill and the Civic Center area. The Western SOMA Community Planproposed that Seventh and Eighth Streets be improved. Both Seventh and Eighth Streets north ofthe freeway are strong candidates for near-term improvement through the EN TRIPS project,particularly if the project wishes to provide a design template one-way SOMA arterials.16th Street – Guerrero Street to Terry Francois Boulevard. Sixteenth Street is the only east-west arterial that extends all the way from the Mission District to the eastern waterfront. As such,it is a vital vehicle and transit connection for three of the Eastern Neighborhoods, and will becomeeven more important as Mission Bay and the waterfront develop. From a transportationoperations perspective, 16th Street is made up of four distinct segments: Guerrero to South VanNess Avenue; South Van Ness Avenue to Potrero Avenue; Potrero Avenue to 7th Street; and 7thStreet to Terry Francois Boulevard. Under the TEP, the 22 Fillmore will run the length of 16thStreet, providing the only major east-west connection through the Mission, Showplace Square,and Potrero Hill. In 2035, demand for ridership on the 22-Fillmore is forecast to exceed capacitybetween Guerrero and Arkansas. Significant traffic delay is also projected, particularly at PotreroAvenue and Third Streets. Significant growth is forecast for the 16th Street corridor and theneighborhoods that it links together. Ensuring transit priority for the 16th Street corridor should bea priority for the EN TRIPS project.Third Street – South of King Street. Third Street in Mission Bay and the Central Waterfrontreceived high scores in the transit category, because of very high projected demand for the T-Third service. In 2035 forecasts, it is projected that demand for the T-Third will far exceed vehiclecapacity in this segment. Current pedestrian and bicycle collision rates are very low on ThirdStreet, due to low densities and low volumes of trips. However, the segment north of 16th Streethas very high projected growth, due to employment and population growth forecast for MissionBay. Third Street is expected to see a very large increase in vehicle volumes and significantvehicle delays. However, a major investment has only recently been made in transit service in thecorridor (the T-Third Street Muni Metro line), and this investment will be leveraged withcompletion of the Central Subway project in a few years. For this reason, it may not be practicalfor the EN TRIPS project to invest significant design effort in transit improvements along ThirdStreet in the near term.Division Street. Division Street marks the boundary between the South of Market arterialnetwork and the Mission District, and it runs mostly underneath the Central Freeway segment of 5
  8. 8. EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and RecommendationsUS 101. Division Street is an important east-west bicycle route, and bicycle lanes are planned.While high traffic volumes are not projected on Division, two intersections are projected to sufferfrom substantial vehicle delay in 2035: Bryant and Townsend/Eighth. Participants in the ENTRIPS community workshop noted that Division Street is poorly lit and feels unsafe forpedestrians and bicyclists. Previous City plans and studies have considered removing part of theoverhead Central Freeway and rebuilding Division itself, possibly as a multiway boulevard. Whilethis idea was studied and not implemented in the past, the elevated freeway will requireexpensive investment if it is to be maintained over the coming years. The SFCTA will consider thefuture of the Central Freeway as part of the upcoming Countywide Transportation Plan. As such,Division Street is not strong candidate for a near-term design project through the EN TRIPSproject.Mission Street - Eleventh Street to 16th Street. The Mission District segment of Mission Streetemerges as a high priority corridor from the screening analysis primarily because of high transitneeds. As compared to South of Market arterials, existing pedestrian facilities on Mission arestrong. Though not a designated bicycle corridor, Mission Street does carry a substantial volumeof bicycle traffic, and the high number of bicycle collisions reflects this function. Demand for travelon Muni’s 49 Mission-Van Ness is forecast to far exceed available capacity by 2035. EN TRIPScommunity meeting participants noted the need for additional express bus service on MissionStreet. Because of high transit demand and high volumes of traffic forecast, Mission Street is astrong candidate for transit priority treatments. However, the SFMTA’s Transit EffectivenessProject has taken responsibility for designing and implementing transit priority treatments for thissegment of Mission Street.Step 6. Assess capacity constraints and opportunities in the vehiclecirculation network.Building on Steps 1 – 5, in Step 6 we assessed the vehicle circulation network in the South ofMarket. This assessment identified street segments with potential “excess vehicular capacity,”based on a comparison of 2035 forecast vehicle volumes and roadway capacity. The analysisconsiders the relationship between volume (the peak hour vehicle demand in a particulardirection), and capacity (the number of vehicles that can be accommodated by a particularapproach or roadway based on a number of factors). Roadway capacity depends upon thenumber of travel lanes, signal timing, tow-away lanes, and others. This relationship is expressedas volume over capacity, or ‘V/C’. A V/C of less than 1.0 represents an approach that is belowcapacity, a V/C of 1.0 represents “at-capacity” operations, and a V/C greater than 1.0 represents“breakdown”, i.e. stop-and-go operations.The study team calculated V/C ratios for the forecast year (2035) for the majority of intersectionapproaches in the study area bounded by 3rd Street, Mission Street, 10th Street, and BryantStreet. The team also performed ‘screenline’ analysis to determine where excess vehiclecapacity may exist in the SOMA vehicle network as a whole in 2035. A screenline is apredetermined boundary that can be used to group several segments together for the purposes ofdetermining aggregate volume/capacity for several streets at once. 6
  9. 9. The analysis found that all of the study roadways in the vicinity of Third and Fourth Streets areforecast to be either at or above capacity during the PM peak in 2035. Howard Street, FolsomStreet, and Bryant Street appear to have excess capacity west of Fifth Street. Additionally,intersections that included freeway on- or off-ramps generally appear to have higher v/c ratiosthan other intersections in the study area.For the north-south SOMA arterials, the western SOMA street network appears to have someavailable capacity in the northbound direction at Harrison Street and at the Mission Streetscreenline. In the southbound travel direction, the western SOMA street network is forecast to beabove capacity at Mission Street, but just under capacity at Harrison Street. In the eastern SOMAarea, the network is well above capacity in the southbound direction, but has capacity available inthe northbound direction. This pattern reflects PM peak period commute travel, with driverstraveling towards the freeway.For the east-west SOMA arterials, the network appears to have available capacity in bothdirections for screenlines in the western SOMA area. At the Third Street screenline, however,vehicle volumes are forecast to be well above capacity in the westbound direction.These findings suggest that changes could be made to streets in several parts of the SOMAstreet network without major disruption to vehicle circulation. It is important to note that whileforecasts of traffic conditions are one important factor in choosing transportation systeminvestments, a forecast that vehicle volumes may exceed available capacity in a particularsegment does not necessarily exclude that segment from consideration for a corridorimprovement project.RecommendationsThe next step for EN TRIPS will be to work with community stakeholders to design three near-term corridor improvement projects. The project will also investigate ways to mitigate recurringtransportation challenges in the study area through existing SFMTA projects and programs. Thissection discusses recommendations for next steps for each of these areas of work.Near-term corridor improvement projects. The consultant team recommends the followingcorridor segments for near-term design projects through the EN TRIPS projects:  Folsom Street between Fifth and Eleventh Streets. Working together in a one-way couplet with Howard Street, Folsom Street travels through the center of the western and eastern South of Market neighborhoods, connecting them to the Transbay District and downtown. Folsom Street is also projected to see substantial growth in residential and employment density as a result of recently completed land use planning efforts. Pedestrian facility deficiencies on Folsom include narrow sidewalks, long crossing distances, and long distances between crossings. Along with Howard Street, Folsom is a vital east-west link in the South of Market bicycle network in a part of the city that is expected to see substantial growth in vehicle traffic. As an important street for bicycles, Folsom is projected to have relatively high vehicle traffic volumes. It has also suffered in the past from relatively high rates of bicycle collisions. Finally, Folsom Street was identified as a high-need corridor in the Eastern Neighborhoods area plans, and improving Folsom was specified as a priority project by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. The Western SOMA Community plan identifies Folsom as a center of that community and key pedestrian and transit travel corridor, focusing on the western segment of Folsom between Fourth and Eleventh Streets. Through design work on Folsom Street, the EN TRIPS project will also produce principals and operating concepts that the SFMTA will apply in future projects to improve other SOMA east-west arterials. 7
  10. 10. EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendations  Sixteenth Street between Potrero Avenue and Seventh Street. Because the 22 Fillmore service planned for 16th Street will be a vital transit link between several growing neighborhoods in the EN TRIPS study area, 16th Street will require transit priority treatments on all four of its major segments. As an important first step towards these improvements, 16th Street between Potrero Avenue and Seventh Streets is recommended for a near-term corridor segment improvement project. This segment has been prioritized above other segments of 16th because of expected residential growth, forecast vehicle congestion, transit capacity constraints, and community priority as expressed through the EN TRIPS community workshop. While land use densities in this section are currently low, due to rezoning as part of the Eastern Neighborhoods land use plan, as many as 3,000 new housing units could be built along this segment of 16th by 2035, leading to a substantial growth in residential density, as well as increasing vehicle and pedestrian travel demand. Through design work on this segment, the EN TRIPS project will also produce principles and operating concepts that the SFMTA will apply in future projects to develop transit priority treatments for the remaining segments of 16th Street.  Seventh and Eighth Streets - Market Street to Brannan Street. Seventh and Eighth Streets from Market to Brannan, which work together to form a one-way couplet through the western South of Market area, are recommended for near-term improvement. Because the dimensions for these two streets are so similar, EN TRIPS project resources will allow the project team to design improvements to both streets as part of a single design effort. Seventh Street travels north and south between its intersection with 16th Street through the South of Market and across Market Street, where it connects to the north of Market street grid. With this alignment, Seventh Street has unique role as a connecting street between several of the Eastern Neighborhoods for drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists. Seventh and Eighth also cut through the portion of the western South of Market where substantial new development is forecast as the result of recent zoning changes. Seventh and Eighth have narrow sidewalks and high rates of pedestrian collisions. Forecast traffic conditions would degrade conditions for cyclists in the bicycle lanes on Seventh and Eighth Streets, which together make up a key north-south link for cyclists between Potrero Hill and the Civic Center area. Finally, the Western SOMA Community Plan proposed that Seventh and Eighth Streets be improved, and the project could help to support ongoing revitalization efforts for the mid-Market area. Through design work on these segments, the EN TRIPS project will also produce principals and operating concepts that the SFMTA will apply in future projects to improve other SOMA north-south arterials.Recurring Transportation Challenges. In addition to three near-term corridor improvementprojects recommended above, the study team will collaborate with SFMTA to preparerecommendations for solutions to transportation challenges that recur throughout the study area.These challenges, which were catalogued through the EN TRIPS existing conditions work, will beorganized by challenge type, mapped, and evaluated to provide guidance on how they can beaddressed through on-going SFMTA transportation improvement programs. This guidance willbe illustrated and included in the EN TRIPS Final Report. Many of these types of challenges willbe addressed through existing programs at SFMTA – for these challenges, EN TRIPS work willdesignate departments at SFMTA and other city agencies that will be responsible for addressingthese issues in the Eastern Neighborhoods, and will recommend next steps. Potentialimplementing parties may include SFMTA service planning and TEP implementation staff,SFMTA traffic calming programs, and others. 8
  11. 11. Next Steps. Next steps for the EN TRIPS project will be as follows: 1. Select final project corridors. (May 2011) 2. Develop design and circulation concepts. (June 2011) 3. Model circulation impacts. (August 2011) 4. Refine design concepts. (September 2011) 5. Assess recurring transportation challenges. (October 2011) 6. Create Funding and Implementation Strategy. (November 2011) 7. Prepare EN TRIPS Report. (December 2011) 9
  12. 12. IntroductionThe Eastern Neighborhoods Transportation Implementation Planning Study (EN TRIPS) isidentifying and developing transportation infrastructure improvements to serve the needs of SanFrancisco’s Eastern Neighborhoods, as envisioned by the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans.The study area of EN TRIPS includes not only the Eastern Neighborhoods themselves (theMission District, Eastern South of Market, Potrero Hill/Showplace Square, and the CentralWaterfront), but also surrounding planning districts (Mission Bay, the Transbay District, andWestern South of Market) that share key transportation corridors with the EasternNeighborhoods.The first work product for the EN TRIPS study, the Existing Conditions report, assembled data oncurrent travel patterns and known transportation system deficiencies in the study area. Thesecond work product, the Future Conditions report, examined projections of land use change,travel patterns, and transportation system capacity for a 2035 horizon year, including the growthin the area anticipated by the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans. There were a number ofconsistent themes in different parts of the study area:  As the result of land use regulation changes and overall regional growth, very large increases in population, employment, and total travel demand are projected for the Eastern Neighborhoods study area by 2035. The South of Market area will see the majority of population growth, but several areas of growth are projected in the rest of the study area, including Mission Bay, the Central Waterfront, and Showplace Square.  Both the physical constraints of the study area and the City’s Transit First Policy preclude major expansions of roadway capacity as a strategy for dealing with projected vehicle volumes and congestion.  As a result of the projected growth, there will be competing demands for space on South of Market streets. Areas with lower projected growth may also require pedestrian and public realm improvements.  In addition to strategies for managing or reducing vehicle congestion, maintaining and improving quality of life in the parts of the Eastern Neighborhoods that are poised for substantial growth will require the city to maintain and expand alternatives to travel by private vehicle. Investments could include: transit priority street treatments; new bicycle facilities; and further development of safe and comfortable pedestrian spaces.To ensure that EN TRIPS resources are focused on places that would benefit most, the currentphase of the study has screened and prioritized transportation needs in the large study area bystreet segment. Using this data and input from the public, the study team has chosen a smallnumber of transportation street segments to recommend for near-term improvement projects.The aim of these projects is that they will not only address a specific transportation issue, but willalso work to develop a solution for problems that occur widely throughout the study area. Inaddition, the project will investigate ways to mitigate recurring transportation challenges in thestudy area through existing SFMTA projects and programs.This report explains the method that the EN TRIPS team used to rank and prioritize streetsegments, and recommends projects that should be carried through for design andimplementation. These recommendations will be reviewed by the Eastern NeighborhoodsCitizens Advisory Committee before the SFMTA makes a final determination of priority corridorsegments for improvement. The method is summarized below. 10
  13. 13. MethodologyTo determine which street segments in the study area should be the focus of near-term corridorimprovement projects, each eligible major transportation corridor in the study area was screenedbased on the following procedure: 1. Divide the major transportation corridors in the study area segments with consistent function and character. 2. Assess which corridor segments fall in high growth areas. 3. Score each segment based on need for bicycle, pedestrian, and transit improvements. 4. Assess outliers that may represent special challenges and opportunities. 5. Of the ‘high growth,’ ‘high need’, and ‘outlier’ corridor segments, identify opportunities for a near-term corridor improvement projects. 6. Assess capacity constraints and opportunities in the vehicle circulation network.These steps are outlined in more detail below.Step 1. Divide the major transportation corridors in the study area intofunctional segments.The study considered for near-term corridor improvement projects only those streets that are partof one of the city’s modal transportation networks as designated through existing City policy.These networks are as follows, and are illustrated in Figure 1:  Vehicular Network (San Francisco General Plan)  Truck Routes (SFMTA recommended Truck Routes)  Bicycle Network (San Francisco Bicycle Plan)  Transit Priority Streets (SFMTA Transit Effectiveness Project)For the initial assessment of corridor needs by mode, the streets that belong to one or more ofthese networks were then divided into segments that have a cohesive character and function. Todivide segments, the study team considered:  Modal priorities: for example, some segments of a particular street have transit service, while others do not.  Directionality: where street segments change directionality (for example, shift from one- way to two-way operations), the character of the street changes.  Consistency: We have tried to break street segments for adjacent and parallel streets at roughly the same point in order to maintain consistency across segments.The outcome of this balance of priorities is as follows: In the South of Market area, most of theeast-west streets (Mission through Brannan) have been divided into three parts: aTransbay/Financial District segment from the Embarcadero to either Second or Third street,where the streets have mostly two-way operations; a short mid-Market segment where the streetsshift to one-way operations (roughly between Third and Fifth streets); and a longer WesternSouth of Market segment, stretching roughly from Fifth Street to Division Street. King Street,which is much shorter, has been assessed as a single segment. Outside of the South of Marketarea, most of the North-South streets are divided at 16th Street. Most of the east-west streetshave been divided at Potrero Avenue. In Potrero Hill, the analysis considers the full length of any 11
  14. 14. EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING STUDYCorridor Screening Methodology and Recommendationsstreet that has transit service. Based on these designations, the major circulation corridorsegments used in the initial needs analysis are listed in Figures 2 and 3.Once the initial needs and growth analyses were completed (Steps 2 and 3), the extents ofseveral corridors segments were further refined in Steps 4 and 5 to respond to specific needs andopportunities. The refined project extents, along with the reasons for refinement, are discussed inmore detail in the descriptions of Steps 4 and 5 below. 12

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