Driving Resiliency for Network Closets & Edge-of-Network Applications

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As more business functions and processes become network-enabled, the reliability of the network infrastructure that supports them becomes a higher priority. In this presentation from Tech University 2007, learn about how adaptive infrastructure solutions help maximize your system availability and ensure resiliency in your enterprise.


For more information, visit: http://www.Liebert.com

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  • What is converged networking? As you will see in a few minutes the criticality of the network has extended well beyond the data center. What we need is to make sure our infrastructure is covered from all aspects, and they are….
  • Business requirement are affecting network reliability or is it affected by network reliability? What is the growth of these applications and the size and how many people are using these?
  • Most organizations have invested heavily in power and cooling systems that ensure high availability of data center systems because the data center is considered critical to the business, Generally speaking, users have been less likely to invest in high availability power and cooling solutions at the edge of the network because it wasn’t thought to be necessary.
  • But with convergence, the edge of the network is as mission critical as the data center. With both voice and data traffic on the same network, even short interruptions in power can be costly and damaging. In addition, the issue of emergency communications must be considered. Can you afford a power outage to disable employees’ ability to call 9-1-1 or other emergency services.
  • So if we want to expand our mission critical infrastructure to all layers of our network, we must incorporate the same protection elements that keep our data center up and running continuously. These are power, cooling, monitoring and service. Mission critical data centers standardize on the most reliable power, cooling, monitoring and service elements to help maintain system availability. How do we incorporate this into the computer rooms and network closets for IP telephony?
  • We’ll start with the power elements. The overriding goal here is to maintain the availability and integrity of the protected network.
  • Before we get into how to create a power infrastructure for IP telephony, let’s take a look at where you’re at. You have a checklist of questions in your packets – some questions Liebert and Cisco put together to help you identify the need for network and power and cooling system upgrades. Let’s consider the first one relating to IP telephony. For those of you considering Power over Ethernet, how many know whether you have enough UPS capacity? We’ll talk more about PoE today, but you’re probably going to need to add some capacity for backup. How many of you are used to placing UPSs in network closet equipment? A lot of people don’t, but with IP telephony you will. How about the next question – how many of you have network closet UPSs with runtime of an hour or more? You’ll find that you’ll need more runtime with IP telephony, so we’ll spend some time today talking about why? How many people are using online technology – the type that conditions against every type of power anomaly? There’s also going to be a difference in the type of UPS you’ll use for IP telephony.
  • First, let’s look at how different tiers of UPS architecture support different levels of availability. Most of you probably have at least a tier 3 architecture in your data center, but what about the equipment room or network closet? Increasingly we are seeing these distributed spaces move from tier 2 to tier 3 or tier 3 to tier 4. This means in some cases, not only are you adding a UPS to your network closet, you may be adding a redundant UPS, or UPS module, or maybe even incorporating two separate UPS systems to carry through a dual bus configuration out to the network closet. Most network closets will operate in the tier 2 or 3 range for IP telephony.
  • There is also a choice to be made in the UPS technology selected for the network closet. In the data center, this isn’t as big of an issue because the majority of data centers utilize an Online technology because of it’s continuous power conditioning, extended battery life, and fault tolerant, redundant path of power. In the network closets, the majority of data network components are being powered by a line interactive UPS technology, which has been sufficient for non-mission critical applications. For converged network applications, it is recommended that an online technology be used for the same reasons as in the data center, but also to better support extended battery runtimes or to operate with backup generators (recommended for IP Telephony applications).
  • Tie together the high-availability architecture and technology slides…
  • Let’s look at how UPS technology affects availability. Here are the components of an online UPS to the left of the switch. A few definitions: The Recifier… The Batteries… The Inverter… The Static Bypass… This is the minimum configuration we recommend for IP telephony. It’s not true redundancy but the bypass switch adds the ability to continue to power the switch during UPS maintenance. This would be considered a “tier 2” architecture.
  • Here we can see the same configuration, but with the actual UPS and switch devices…
  • This is a 1 + 1 redundant system, which we are seeing much more of in remote locations. Redundant 2U or 4U rackmount UPS systems can provide some redundancy to single-corded devices. There are many other types of redundancy besides 1 + 1.
  • Here we can see a graphic representation of this configuration. One added device would be some sort of transfer switch sitting in between the UPS units and the IP switch to transfer between power sources automatically if one fails.
  • This is a 1 + 1 redundant system, which we are seeing much more of in remote locations. Redundant 2U or 4U rackmount UPS systems can provide some redundancy to single-corded devices. There are many other types of redundancy besides 1 + 1.
  • Here we can see a graphic representation of this configuration. One added device would be some sort of transfer switch sitting in between the UPS units and the IP switch to transfer between power sources automatically if one fails.
  • This is a dual bus redundant system, which is more common in the data center environment, but available for remote locations. Redundant 2U or 4U rackmount UPS systems can support dual-corded devices
  • Here we can see a graphic representation of this configuration. A separate UPS would feed power to each power supply in the connected device. This would enable the device to remain available even during a power supply or bus failure….especially useful for servicing and maintaining infrastructure support equipment.
  • DC UPS is an established technology used by the telecommunications industry for many years to provide high levels of availability in the traditional voice network. This technology is now being considered as an alternative for powering the converged network. The major benefits with the DC UPS is that power can scale with your IP phone implementations, and will cost-effectively provide extended battery run time for environments without backup generator power. Generally, we would use DC power for implementations with more than 100 PoE ports.
  • Driving Resiliency for Network Closets & Edge-of-Network Applications

    1. 1. Driving Resiliency for Network Closets & Edge-of-Network Apps Matt Zieg – Strategic Sales Manager Doug Lust – Southeast Channel Manager PROPRIETARY INFORMATION: The information contained in this presentation is the property of Emerson Network Power and is subject to change without notice. Except as specifically authorized in writing by Emerson Network Power, the holder of this presentation shall keep all information contained herein confidential and shall protect same in whole or in part from disclosure and dissemination to all third parties.
    2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>What has changed? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Converged Networking </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How does this change affect me? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased criticality of the distributed infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Developing the high availability infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cooling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Achieving infrastructure resilience </li></ul>
    3. 3. What has changed <ul><li>Business requirements affected by network reliability? </li></ul><ul><li>Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>VoIP </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video Conferencing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unified Messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E-commerce </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supplier Integration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hardware requirements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How much power and cooling is needed? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More than might be expected… </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Traditional Approach to Infrastructure Network Closets Computer Rooms Data Center Less Critical Most Critical
    5. 5. Convergence Requires New Approach Network Closets Computer Rooms Data Center Critical
    6. 6. The Mission Critical Infrastructure <ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase availability and integrity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improving availability while accommodating growth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cooling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Designed to handle electronic loads 24x7 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Immediate event notification and predictive management </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid response </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Zero affect on system availability </li></ul></ul></ul>
    7. 7. The Mission Critical Infrastructure <ul><li>Power </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving availability while accommodating growth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cooling </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designed to handle electronic loads 24x7 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Immediate event notification and predictive management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zero affect on system availability </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Quick Power Assessment <ul><li>Does your current power protection system have the additional capacity required for Power over Ethernet applications? </li></ul><ul><li>How many of you as a rule place UPSs in your network closets? </li></ul><ul><li>How many of you have UPSs in network closets with runtimes of an hour or more? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there a Generator available? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How many people are using online UPS technology – the type that conditions against every type of power anomaly? </li></ul>
    9. 9. UPS Architecture (3) 99.9% Avoid Power Transients Protect Hardware Tier 0 (7-8) 99.999999% (6-7) 99.99999% (5-6) 99.9999% (4) 99.99% 9’s of Availability Computer / Communication System is the Business NO Downtime Tier 4 Computer / Communication System is Critical to Business Increased Uptime (business continuity) Tier 3 Orderly Shutdown and improved uptime. Reduce unexpected interruptions Preserve Data Integrity Some business interruption Tier 2 Avoid Power Outages Backup Power Tier 1 Customer Concerns Customer Requirements
    10. 10. UPS System Selection <ul><li>Line Interactive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology used in many network closets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost-effective solution for data applications </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On-Line Double Conversion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuously conditioned power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extends battery life and maintains capacities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fault tolerant, redundant power path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard technology in mission critical data centers </li></ul></ul>Double Conversion UPS in IP telephony application
    11. 11. Architecture and Technology
    12. 12. Single Module with Bypass – Tier 1 Inverter Rectifier/ Charger IP Switch Batteries Static Bypass
    13. 13. Single Module with Bypass – Tier 1
    14. 14. Redundant Component – Tier 2 IP Switch Inverter Rectifier/ Charger Batteries Inverter Rectifier/ Charger Batteries Transfer Switch Static Bypass Static Bypass
    15. 15. Redundant Component – Tier 2
    16. 16. Concurrently Maintainable – Tier 3 IP Switch Inverter Rectifier/ Charger Batteries Static Bypass Utility or Bypass Source
    17. 17. Concurrently Maintainable – Tier 3
    18. 18. Fault Tolerant – Tier 4 IP Switch Inverter Rectifier/ Charger Batteries Inverter Rectifier/ Charger Batteries Static Bypass Static Bypass
    19. 19. Fault Tolerant – Tier 4
    20. 20. A Third Technology Has Emerged <ul><li>Plug-and-play DC UPS systems can provide high availability and efficiency in closets </li></ul><ul><li>Scalable from 3000 to 15,000 Watts </li></ul><ul><li>N+1 redundant standard (Tier 2) </li></ul><ul><li>Can continue to operate with loss of multiple power modules </li></ul><ul><li>2 hour battery run time in 19-inch rack with option… up to 8 hours </li></ul><ul><li>21U of space for IP switch </li></ul><ul><li>Standard technology of traditional PBX phone system infrastructure </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>To view this presentation in its entirety, visit: </li></ul><ul><li>http://w.on24.com/r.htm?e=98979&s=2&k=51ABAADA779DC66EEAD0711537093B68&userreg=n </li></ul>

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