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Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
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Disciplinary Literacy

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Doug Baker's presentation at EMWP's 2/9/2011 "Reading and Writing in a Decade of Standards" Professional Development Series. This was the first of three.

Doug Baker's presentation at EMWP's 2/9/2011 "Reading and Writing in a Decade of Standards" Professional Development Series. This was the first of three.

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  • 1. Disciplinary Literacy W. Douglas Baker Eastern Michigan Writing Project Saturday, February 11, 2012
  • 2. “Disciplinary Literacy”Disciplines include norms and expectations in practicesof interacting; communicating, defending and archivingideas; exploring particular issues and topics andconducting research
  • 3. “Disciplinary Literacy”Disciplines include norms and expectations in practicesof interacting; communicating, defending and archivingideas; exploring particular issues and topics andconducting researchLiteracy: reading and writing (and now, viewing orengaging with multimodal texts)
  • 4. PracticesActions and discourse that constitute “literate”activities, including assumptions and beliefs behind these.
  • 5. PracticesActions and discourse that constitute “literate”activities, including assumptions and beliefs behind these.Example: reciting to learn or writing to learn
  • 6. DiscourseThe language, values and assumptions that we use todefine, discuss or describe ideas or practices
  • 7. DiscourseThe language, values and assumptions that we use todefine, discuss or describe ideas and practicesExample: how we define and describe “reading” or“writing” in our classrooms.
  • 8. Four ConsiderationsStudents’ perspectives of literacy in our subject area
  • 9. Four ConsiderationsStudents’ perspectives of literacy in subject areasTeachers’ perspectives of literacy in their subject areas
  • 10. Four ConsiderationsStudents’ perspectives of literacy in subject areasTeachers’ perspectives of literacy in their subject areasDisciplinary perspectives of literacy
  • 11. Four ConsiderationsStudents’ perspectives of literacy in subject areasTeachers’ perspectives of literacy in their subject areasDisciplinary perspectives of literacyRole of standards and how students and teachers areassessed
  • 12. One more…Opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinarycollaborations

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