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Agri11 - UniBrain

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  •   For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  The Global Foresight Hub: Strengthening the Role of GFAR in Promoting Forward Thinking in AR4D The GCARD Roadmap for transforming agricultural research for development (AR4D) around the world emphasizes the need for “collective focus on key priorities, as determined and shaped by science and society.” The global AR4D community has decided, through the GCARD process, to foster collective foresight action to improve the prioritization of agricultural research and create more relevant and effective innovation systems that are embedded in the needs of the societies that they serve. The GCARD Roadmap also recognizes that “The need for improved foresight must be addressed by mobilizing expert analyses within countries to analyze specific themes of concern and bringing together, via GFAR and the Regional Fora and on a coherent and regular basis, the diverse national and international initiatives to examine relevant development scenarios through different lenses, learning from the outcomes of the different models and perspectives employed. Alongside this, wide stakeholder consultation will be mobilized through national and regional Fora, to ‘groundtruth’ the realities and impacts of trends among poor rural communities.“ GFAR advocates for improved foresight, supported by forward-looking, anticipatory research and analyses that integrates the diverse views of farmers and other stakeholders on specific opportunities and problems facing them. This is demanded by the GCARD Roadmap with the aim of generating policy-informing, but not policy-prescriptive, science-based options by exploring emerging trends and issues beyond the presently perceived boundaries of either their possible consequences or the technical and policy options for addressing them and by highlighting the benefits and trade-offs among the potential responses. There are many institutions involved in forward thinking and GFAR encourages this diversity but the utility and impact of their work has been limited by their isolation from one another. To optimize the utility of foresight GFAR has perceived the need for three distinct but interrelated sets of activities, i. establishing a platform that will enable all players in forward thinking to interact to share their ideas and findings and thereby advance the foresight paradigm; ii. establishing a facility that will enable developing regions to engage proactively in foresight and build human capacity in critical emerging issues, and; iii. creating a space for two-way interaction between foresight analysts and policy makers. This is essential on the one hand to focus forward thinking on relevant issues and on the other to raise the awareness of policy makers to the utility of foresight in their policy making. These three activities will be interconnected to form the GFAR Global Foresight Hub (see Figure). The establishment of a Global Foresight Hub by GFAR which will link international, regional and national levels is consistent with GCARD 1 recommendations, and legitimate given GFAR’s multi-stakeholder nature. It will enable GFAR to fulfill its mandate as a catalyzing mechanism by linking CGIAR centres, Advanced Research institutes (ARIs), NARS, international policy bodies and inititatives (e.g. the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change) with national and regional organization including Civil Society Organizations. The Global Foresight Hub would support and integrate the following three sets of activities:  1. Stimulating forward thinking research debates in agriculture and rural development, taking into account competing non-agricultural demands on human and natural resources, so as to identify common findings, controversies, and limits to the current knowledge with regards to future stakes. For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” which will open room for those engaged in strategic foresight to share results, compare methods, and discuss controversies arising from their field experiences. Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  2. Connecting Science and Society so as to facilitate dialogue between scientists, policy makers and civil society, letting the voice of the final users, especially small farmers, be incorporated in societal choices engaging future research. GFAR will help facilitate regular agriculture and rural development foresight by convening “ Policy Dialogue Platforms (PDP) ” for implementing agencies concerned at international, regional and national levels where the results of the AR4D-FTP will be debated by representatives of civil society and policy makers who will be informed about the implications of their choices.  3. Building capacity of all stakeholders to be able to think ahead when collectively adjusting the content of AR4D to societal needs. GFAR will contribute to the collective capacity building, region by region, starting with Africa, by supporting a “ Global Foresight Academy (GFA) ” that will develop the skills and capabilities of young professionals and support foresight activities on high-priority issues across GFAR constituencies. These three elements compose the core of a potential work plan for GFAR in relation to its duty to inform the first of the six strategic elements of the GCARD1 Roadmap: “Inclusively defines key AR4D priorities and actions, driven by evolving national, regional and global development”. Contributed by:  Robin Bourgeois, Senior Foresight and Development Policies Expert, GFAR Secretariat, robin.bourgeois@fao.org Ralph von Kaufmann, Technical Coordinator, FARA, r.vonkaufmann@fara-africa.org  Please see this link for the full pdf of this document.  Last updated on: Mon Jul 25 15:52:23 CEST 2011   Archive Site Map   |   Contact us   |   Contact webmaster   |   About this website   |    
  •  
  •   Commercialise post harvest technologies so that they will have impact.
  • Now a thousand years later the continent has the youngest and fastest growing population on the planet, it has the greatest store house of natural resources and it is reawakening. Governance has improved, stock markets, albeit from low baselines, have outperformed their counter parts and even in the underperforming agricultural sector there is evidence of sustained improvements in factor productivity. This is good but as expectations of improvements precede realisation there will inevitably be stresses and cracks are appearing in social and political systems across the continent, not only in the North.
  • Now a thousand years later the continent has the youngest and fastest growing population on the planet, it has the greatest store house of natural resources and it is reawakening. Governance has improved, stock markets, albeit from low baselines, have outperformed their counter parts and even in the underperforming agricultural sector there is evidence of sustained improvements in factor productivity. This is good but as expectations of improvements precede realisation there will inevitably be stresses and cracks are appearing in social and political systems across the continent, not only in the North.
  • Now a thousand years later the continent has the youngest and fastest growing population on the planet, it has the greatest store house of natural resources and it is reawakening. Governance has improved, stock markets, albeit from low baselines, have outperformed their counter parts and even in the underperforming agricultural sector there is evidence of sustained improvements in factor productivity. This is good but as expectations of improvements precede realisation there will inevitably be stresses and cracks are appearing in social and political systems across the continent, not only in the North.
  •  
  •   For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  The Global Foresight Hub: Strengthening the Role of GFAR in Promoting Forward Thinking in AR4D The GCARD Roadmap for transforming agricultural research for development (AR4D) around the world emphasizes the need for “collective focus on key priorities, as determined and shaped by science and society.” The global AR4D community has decided, through the GCARD process, to foster collective foresight action to improve the prioritization of agricultural research and create more relevant and effective innovation systems that are embedded in the needs of the societies that they serve. The GCARD Roadmap also recognizes that “The need for improved foresight must be addressed by mobilizing expert analyses within countries to analyze specific themes of concern and bringing together, via GFAR and the Regional Fora and on a coherent and regular basis, the diverse national and international initiatives to examine relevant development scenarios through different lenses, learning from the outcomes of the different models and perspectives employed. Alongside this, wide stakeholder consultation will be mobilized through national and regional Fora, to ‘groundtruth’ the realities and impacts of trends among poor rural communities.“ GFAR advocates for improved foresight, supported by forward-looking, anticipatory research and analyses that integrates the diverse views of farmers and other stakeholders on specific opportunities and problems facing them. This is demanded by the GCARD Roadmap with the aim of generating policy-informing, but not policy-prescriptive, science-based options by exploring emerging trends and issues beyond the presently perceived boundaries of either their possible consequences or the technical and policy options for addressing them and by highlighting the benefits and trade-offs among the potential responses. There are many institutions involved in forward thinking and GFAR encourages this diversity but the utility and impact of their work has been limited by their isolation from one another. To optimize the utility of foresight GFAR has perceived the need for three distinct but interrelated sets of activities, i. establishing a platform that will enable all players in forward thinking to interact to share their ideas and findings and thereby advance the foresight paradigm; ii. establishing a facility that will enable developing regions to engage proactively in foresight and build human capacity in critical emerging issues, and; iii. creating a space for two-way interaction between foresight analysts and policy makers. This is essential on the one hand to focus forward thinking on relevant issues and on the other to raise the awareness of policy makers to the utility of foresight in their policy making. These three activities will be interconnected to form the GFAR Global Foresight Hub (see Figure). The establishment of a Global Foresight Hub by GFAR which will link international, regional and national levels is consistent with GCARD 1 recommendations, and legitimate given GFAR’s multi-stakeholder nature. It will enable GFAR to fulfill its mandate as a catalyzing mechanism by linking CGIAR centres, Advanced Research institutes (ARIs), NARS, international policy bodies and inititatives (e.g. the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change) with national and regional organization including Civil Society Organizations. The Global Foresight Hub would support and integrate the following three sets of activities:  1. Stimulating forward thinking research debates in agriculture and rural development, taking into account competing non-agricultural demands on human and natural resources, so as to identify common findings, controversies, and limits to the current knowledge with regards to future stakes. For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” which will open room for those engaged in strategic foresight to share results, compare methods, and discuss controversies arising from their field experiences. Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  2. Connecting Science and Society so as to facilitate dialogue between scientists, policy makers and civil society, letting the voice of the final users, especially small farmers, be incorporated in societal choices engaging future research. GFAR will help facilitate regular agriculture and rural development foresight by convening “ Policy Dialogue Platforms (PDP) ” for implementing agencies concerned at international, regional and national levels where the results of the AR4D-FTP will be debated by representatives of civil society and policy makers who will be informed about the implications of their choices.  3. Building capacity of all stakeholders to be able to think ahead when collectively adjusting the content of AR4D to societal needs. GFAR will contribute to the collective capacity building, region by region, starting with Africa, by supporting a “ Global Foresight Academy (GFA) ” that will develop the skills and capabilities of young professionals and support foresight activities on high-priority issues across GFAR constituencies. These three elements compose the core of a potential work plan for GFAR in relation to its duty to inform the first of the six strategic elements of the GCARD1 Roadmap: “Inclusively defines key AR4D priorities and actions, driven by evolving national, regional and global development”. Contributed by:  Robin Bourgeois, Senior Foresight and Development Policies Expert, GFAR Secretariat, robin.bourgeois@fao.org Ralph von Kaufmann, Technical Coordinator, FARA, r.vonkaufmann@fara-africa.org  Please see this link for the full pdf of this document.  Last updated on: Mon Jul 25 15:52:23 CEST 2011   Archive Site Map   |   Contact us   |   Contact webmaster   |   About this website   |    
  •   For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  The Global Foresight Hub: Strengthening the Role of GFAR in Promoting Forward Thinking in AR4D The GCARD Roadmap for transforming agricultural research for development (AR4D) around the world emphasizes the need for “collective focus on key priorities, as determined and shaped by science and society.” The global AR4D community has decided, through the GCARD process, to foster collective foresight action to improve the prioritization of agricultural research and create more relevant and effective innovation systems that are embedded in the needs of the societies that they serve. The GCARD Roadmap also recognizes that “The need for improved foresight must be addressed by mobilizing expert analyses within countries to analyze specific themes of concern and bringing together, via GFAR and the Regional Fora and on a coherent and regular basis, the diverse national and international initiatives to examine relevant development scenarios through different lenses, learning from the outcomes of the different models and perspectives employed. Alongside this, wide stakeholder consultation will be mobilized through national and regional Fora, to ‘groundtruth’ the realities and impacts of trends among poor rural communities.“ GFAR advocates for improved foresight, supported by forward-looking, anticipatory research and analyses that integrates the diverse views of farmers and other stakeholders on specific opportunities and problems facing them. This is demanded by the GCARD Roadmap with the aim of generating policy-informing, but not policy-prescriptive, science-based options by exploring emerging trends and issues beyond the presently perceived boundaries of either their possible consequences or the technical and policy options for addressing them and by highlighting the benefits and trade-offs among the potential responses. There are many institutions involved in forward thinking and GFAR encourages this diversity but the utility and impact of their work has been limited by their isolation from one another. To optimize the utility of foresight GFAR has perceived the need for three distinct but interrelated sets of activities, i. establishing a platform that will enable all players in forward thinking to interact to share their ideas and findings and thereby advance the foresight paradigm; ii. establishing a facility that will enable developing regions to engage proactively in foresight and build human capacity in critical emerging issues, and; iii. creating a space for two-way interaction between foresight analysts and policy makers. This is essential on the one hand to focus forward thinking on relevant issues and on the other to raise the awareness of policy makers to the utility of foresight in their policy making. These three activities will be interconnected to form the GFAR Global Foresight Hub (see Figure). The establishment of a Global Foresight Hub by GFAR which will link international, regional and national levels is consistent with GCARD 1 recommendations, and legitimate given GFAR’s multi-stakeholder nature. It will enable GFAR to fulfill its mandate as a catalyzing mechanism by linking CGIAR centres, Advanced Research institutes (ARIs), NARS, international policy bodies and inititatives (e.g. the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change) with national and regional organization including Civil Society Organizations. The Global Foresight Hub would support and integrate the following three sets of activities:  1. Stimulating forward thinking research debates in agriculture and rural development, taking into account competing non-agricultural demands on human and natural resources, so as to identify common findings, controversies, and limits to the current knowledge with regards to future stakes. For this, GFAR will provide a mechanism, under the form an annual “ global AR4D Forward Thinking Platform (AR4D-FTP) ” which will open room for those engaged in strategic foresight to share results, compare methods, and discuss controversies arising from their field experiences. Every second year it will be part of the GCARD meeting enabling persons engaged in foresight activities around the world to meet to agree on issues where collective foresight actions can bring particular value, and to share perspectives and learning generated from each region.  2. Connecting Science and Society so as to facilitate dialogue between scientists, policy makers and civil society, letting the voice of the final users, especially small farmers, be incorporated in societal choices engaging future research. GFAR will help facilitate regular agriculture and rural development foresight by convening “ Policy Dialogue Platforms (PDP) ” for implementing agencies concerned at international, regional and national levels where the results of the AR4D-FTP will be debated by representatives of civil society and policy makers who will be informed about the implications of their choices.  3. Building capacity of all stakeholders to be able to think ahead when collectively adjusting the content of AR4D to societal needs. GFAR will contribute to the collective capacity building, region by region, starting with Africa, by supporting a “ Global Foresight Academy (GFA) ” that will develop the skills and capabilities of young professionals and support foresight activities on high-priority issues across GFAR constituencies. These three elements compose the core of a potential work plan for GFAR in relation to its duty to inform the first of the six strategic elements of the GCARD1 Roadmap: “Inclusively defines key AR4D priorities and actions, driven by evolving national, regional and global development”. Contributed by:  Robin Bourgeois, Senior Foresight and Development Policies Expert, GFAR Secretariat, robin.bourgeois@fao.org Ralph von Kaufmann, Technical Coordinator, FARA, r.vonkaufmann@fara-africa.org  Please see this link for the full pdf of this document.  Last updated on: Mon Jul 25 15:52:23 CEST 2011   Archive Site Map   |   Contact us   |   Contact webmaster   |   About this website   |    

Agri11  - UniBrain Agri11 - UniBrain Presentation Transcript

  • Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
    • through the
    • Universities, Business and Research in Agricultural Innovation (UniBRAIN)
      • a pan-African initiative supported by Denmark
    • Wide scale investment in agribusiness and agro-industry in Africa is presently constrained by: Human and institutional capacity deficits
    • African universities are not sufficiently geared to meet the needs of industry
    • Graduates often cannot find employment while many small businesses lack staff with the education and skills needed to drive innovation
    • Essentially the relationship between the demands of the private sector and what universities teach is too weak
    • Nowhere are the these deficiencies more critical than in agriculture, Africa’s dominant industry
    • However, studies show that when university graduates do business they create more jobs than those without university education
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture Background to UniBRAIN
      • UniBRAIN will break the barriers and foster collaboration between universities, business and research to create cultures and environments that will:
        • value, encourage and enable innovation
        • produce graduates who are problem solvers
        • who are potential entrepreneurs
        • especially women and youths
      • UniBRAIN will establish a agribusiness incubators as organizations for accelerating the creation of successful enterprises by providing them with a comprehensive and integrated range of support, including incubator space, business support services and clustering and networking opportunities
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture Purpose of UniBRAIN
    • UniBRAIN is a pan-African initiative supported by Denmark
    • UniBRAIN’s development objective is:
    • to contribute to enabling African countries to create jobs and raise incomes through sustainable agribusiness development
    • UniBRAIN’s Immediate Objective is:
    • to enable universities, business and agricultural research institutions to commercialise agricultural technologies and produce graduates with entrepreneurial and business skills through agribusiness incubator partnerships
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture UniBRAIN’s objectives
    • UniBRAIN’s objective will be realised by:
    • Output #1: Commercialisation of agribusiness innovations supported and promoted
    • Output #2: Agribusiness graduates with the potential to become efficient entrepreneurs produced by tertiary educational institutions
    • Output #3: UniBRAIN’s innovative outputs, experiences and practices shared and up-scaled
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture UniBRAIN’s outputs
  • UniBRAIN Partners
    • The Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) with the Sub Regional Organisations (SROs):
          • The Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in East and Central Africa (ASARECA )
          • The Conseil Ouest et Centre Africain pour la Recherche et le Développement Agricoles/the West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD)
          • Centre for Coordinating Agricultural Research and Development in Southern Africa (CCARDESA)
    • The African Network for Agriculture, Agro forestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE)
      • The Pan African Agribusiness and Agro Industry Consortium (PanAAC)
    • The Agribusiness Incubator Initiative of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ABI-ICRISAT)
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • UniBRAIN Agribusiness Innovation Incubator Consortia
    • The Consortium for enhancing University Responsiveness to Agribusiness Development (UniBRAIN-CURAD) focusing on plantation cash crops; Specific value chain: Coffee
    • The Incubation and Diversification of Banana Products for Agribusiness (UniBRAIN-IDBPA) focusing on Smallholder staple food and cash crops; Specific value chain: Banana
    • The Sorghum Value Chain Development Consortium (UniBRAIN-SVCDC) focusing on smallholder dry land food grains; Specific value chain: Sorghum
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • UniBRAIN Agribusiness Innovation Incubator Consortia
    • The Creating Competitive Livestock-bias Entrepreneurs in Agribusiness (UniBRAIN-CCLEAr) focusing on Smallholder livestock; Specific value chain: Livestock
    • The Innovative Centre for Agro-forestry (UniBRAIN-CAF) focusing on agro-forestry products; Specific value chains: non-timber forestry products, cereals and fruits
    • The Agri-Business Incubation Trust (UniBRAIN-AgBIT) focusing on tropical fruit; Specific value chain: Mango
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • UniBRAIN CAF UniBRAIN CCLEAR UniBRAIN AgBIT UniBRAIN SVCDC UniBRAIN IDBPA UniBRAIN CURAD UniBRAIN Agribusiness incubators Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • Why and how will African universities link with agribusiness
    • UniBRAIN will support universities, businesses and research institutions to establish agribusiness incubators, which will provide:
      • facilitation for creating competitive agribusinesses through technology development and commercialisation
      • handholding services starting from business conceptualization to implementation and scaling up
      • support for realising business concepts from university faculty and graduates, researchers and agribusinesses
      • consultancy services to agribusiness
      • help in accessing financing for SMEs and start-ups approaching impact investors and social capitalists
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture Functions of the Agribusiness Innovation Incubators
  • Example Incubator Client Categories and Services Start Up Growth Expansion Mature Networking (domestic and International) Technologically capable, Productivity driven and Globally competitive Assistance in Brand Development Assistance and linkages to funding and market Handholding through business coaching, mentoring, consultancy and training on mindsetting, Business plan, Accounting, marketing, communication skills etc Biotech; Agribusiness; Production assistance Incubation services and shared facilities Selection/ Assessment Pre-incubation/ Preseed
    • Technology commercialization
    • Product and process improvement
    • Technology Transfer Office
    • IP Management
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture Diagramme by ANAFE
  • Functions of the Agribusiness Innovation Incubators
      • The mission of the incubator is to facilitate the creation of competitive agribusiness enterprises through technology development and commercialization
      • The incubator, helps new entrepreneurs and enterprise clients with handholding services starting from business conceptualization to implementation and scaling up
      • It is up to the clients to choose the kind of services they want from the incubator
    • The agribusiness incubators will provide institutional frameworks for:
      • the realisation of business concepts from university faculty and graduates, agricultural research and agribusinesses of all sizes
      • consultancy services to agribusiness
      • help in accessing financing for SMEs and start-ups by approaching banks, impact investors and social capitalists
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • Summary
      • The UniBRAIN Agribusiness Incubators will become operational in 2012
      • They are being established to create opportunities for agribusiness
      • They want to raise awareness
        • that they exist
        • of the value chains they will be working in
        • about what they are going to offer
        • The are looking forward to meeting the African agribusiness community
        • to get advice and information
        • share ideas
        • to meet potential business partners
    Opportunities for agribusiness in African agriculture
  • Thank you