Agri09-Day II - Session I - Raymond Auerbach - Rainman
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Agri09-Day II - Session I - Raymond Auerbach - Rainman

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Agri09-Day II - Session I - Raymond Auerbach - Rainman Agri09-Day II - Session I - Raymond Auerbach - Rainman Presentation Transcript

  • Big business for small farmers:Africas comparative advantage in the world organic market Dr Raymond Auerbach Director, Rainman Landcare Foundation Rainman Landcare Foundation 1 17/02/2011
  • World: Development oforganic agricultural land 1999-2007 (Revised May 2009) 35 Million hectares 32.2 30 30.8 29.9 29.2 25 25.7 20 19.9 17.4 15 14.8 10 11.0 5 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Source: FiBL, IFOAM & SOEL 2000-2009Rainman Landcare Foundation 2 17/02/2011
  • World: The ten countries withthe largest numbers of organicproducers 2007 Uganda 206,803 India 195,741 Ethiopia 165,560 Mexico 128,819Tanzania 90,222 Italy 43,159 Peru 36,093 Greece 23,769 Zambia 20,000 Austria 19,997 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Source: FiBL & IFOAM Survey 2009Rainman Landcare Foundation 3 17/02/2011
  • Development of the organicagricultural land in Europe1985-2007 9 8 7.7 Land area in million hectares 7.4 6.9 7 6.2 6.4 5.9 6 5.2 5 4.3 4 3.7 3 3 2.3 1.8 2 1.4 0.8 1 1 0.5 0.6 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Source: FiBL, Aberystwyth University, ZMPRainman Landcare Foundation 4 17/02/2011
  • The European Market: Thecountries with the highestsales 2007 Germany 5.30 UK 2.56 France 1.90 Italy 1.87 Switzerland 0.79 Austria 0.74 Spain 0.60 Denmark 0.58Netherlands 0.50 Sweden 0.49 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Sales in billion Euros Source: Aberystwyth University, FiBL & ZMP 2009Rainman Landcare Foundation 5 17/02/2011
  • World Organic Market:currently over US$ 50 billion 50 40 30 World Market 20 (US$ billions) 10 0 1999 2003 2007Rainman Landcare Foundation 6 17/02/2011
  • Uganda: Development of Organic Agriculture  East African Organic300 Standard (2007)250  Cotton, coffee, pineapples Producers200 (x 1000) and bananas for export150  Growing local market Land Area  US$ 22 million certified100 (x 1000 50 organic export ha) (www.organic-world.net) 0 02 04 06 08 20 20 20 20 Rainman Landcare Foundation 7 17/02/2011
  • How do we reduce hunger and poverty?International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge,Science and Technology for DevelopmentThe IAASTD Report for Sub-Saharan Africa states (IAASTD,2008a, p.19 [www.agassess.org]):Strategies of rapid agricultural developmentneed to be coordinated more directly withstrategies for biodiversity and waterconservation such as retaining areas ofnatural vegetation in production areas,keeping areas where pollinators can thrive,promoting organic agriculture, incorporatingtrees in agricultural landscapes. WHY?
  • Both scale and impact ofhuman activities has increased We need to feed 9 billion people by 2050 We have to stop polluting and wasting water We must use energy efficiently, not burn up our resources making a greenhouse Poverty and hunger should reduce dramatically in this century (WSSD, 2002, Triple Bottom Line: Environmental protection, Economic viability, Social Equity = sustainable) The answer is organic farming and locally-centred development projects using renewable resources This will help Africa use her comparative advantage (less history of pollution, recent organic traditional knowledge)Rainman Landcare Foundation 11 17/02/2011
  • Economic and environmentalbenefits: why uphill for organics? US Board on Agriculture (Nat Res Council) Report on Alternative Agriculture 1989, already concluded: Organic farmers derive significant sustained economic and environmental benefits. Federal Policies work against organic farming, and should be changed.International developmental policies also militate against organic farming, in favour of industrial agriculture, which benefits the sponsoring countries, who sell inputs & technology, yet organic farming is productive, sustainable and appropriate – evidence follows:Rainman Landcare Foundation 12 17/02/2011
  • Organics and Food Quality(www.qlif.org)Quality Low Input Food Research Project (Europe, 18 million Euros, 31 Institutions), 2005-2009:Prof Carlo Leifert & Colleagues found Anti-oxidants, 60% higher in dairy; Vitamins, 20% higher in many foods; Wide range of benefits in organic vs conventional foods (Hohenheim, 2007).Rainman Landcare Foundation 13 17/02/2011
  • Poison Residues in Food inGerman Supermarkets -Kwalis 120 96.5 100 80 69.5 Conventional (n=1836) 60 Organic 40 24.6 (n=1041) 20 3.4 5.9 0.1 0 No Poison Traces only Health RiskRainman Landcare Foundation 15 17/02/2011
  • Are Organic yields lower?―In subsistence agriculture, organicfarming doubles or trebles yields, andthe world average organic yields areabout 132% more than current foodproduction levels‖ (FAO, 2007).
  • Water-use efficiency:Building active soils with high content oforganic matter has positive effects on soildrainage and water-holding capacity (20 to 40percent more for heavy loess soils in temperateclimate), including groundwater recharge anddecreased run-offs (FAO, 2007).
  • The FAO study also shows Organic:Non-solar energy use: 33 to 56% less;Carbon sequestration efficiency is almostdoubled;Agrobiodiversity is significantly higher;when compared with conventionalsystems (FAO, 2007).
  • ―Food sovereignty is the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculturesystems. It puts the aspirations and needs of those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations. It ensuresthat the rights to use and manage lands, territories, waters, seeds, livestock and biodiversity are in the hands of those of us who produce food.‖ —Declaration of the Forum for Food Sovereignty, Nyeleni, February 2007
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