Validation Report - Vocational Education & Training Sector
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Validation Report - Vocational Education & Training Sector

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Author: Bulent Yilmaz

Author: Bulent Yilmaz

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    Validation Report - Vocational Education & Training Sector Validation Report - Vocational Education & Training Sector Document Transcript

    •                        Validation  Report    Vocational  Education  &  Training  Sector  Author:  Bulent  Yilmaz   Ver:  Final             This  project  has  been  funded  with  support  from  the  European  Commission    
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe  present  report  constitutes  the  delivery  D5.2  of  the  Work  Package  5:  Validation.    The  core  objectives  of  the  EMPATIC  project  are  to:   -­‐ draw   together   and   valorise   the   results   of   previous   Information   Literacy   initiatives   and   projects   across  the  school,  university,  adult  and  vocational  learning  sectors;     -­‐ use   this   evidence   to   influence   policy   makers’   perceptions   and   actions   to   support   a   marked   increase   in  piloting  and  mainstreaming  of  Information  Literacy;   -­‐ have  a  significant  impact  on  validating  new  learning  paradigms  and  strategic  thinking  on  curriculum   reform.    Within  the  work  plan  of  EMPATIC,  Work  Package  5  aimed  to  validate  the  models,  standards,  performance  measures  and  case  approaches  developed  in  the  previous  work  packages.          Round-­‐table  workshops  were  facilitated  for  each  of  the  four  transversal  sectors,  bringing  together  invited  policy   makers   together   with   expert   stakeholders   (including   researchers   and   representatives   from   the  learning/teaching  professions).    Brief  summaries  of  each  workshop  are  provided,  together  with  outlines  of  key  issues  identified.   2
    • Table of ContentsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................ 2  SECTION 1: WORKSHOP [THE IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATION LITERACY IN THEVOCATIONAL SECTOR] ............................................................................................... 4  1.1. VENUE; DATES ......................................................................................................... 4  1.2. WORKSHOP CHAIR; WORKSHOP RAPPORTEURS ............................................................... 4  1.3. AGENDA/PROGRAMME WITH SPEAKERS ......................................................................... 4  1.4 BRIEF OUTLINE OF POINTS DISCUSSED .......................................................................... 4   1.4.1 FUNCTION OF INFORMATION LITERACY IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (VET) ............................... 4   1.4.2 SITUATION OF VET IN TURKEY.................................................................................. 5   1.4.3 VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROBLEMS IN TURKEY .............................................................. 6   1.4.4 HOW COULD INFORMATION LITERACY BE INTEGRATED INTO VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN TURKEY? .... 6  1.5 MAJOR ISSUES IDENTIFIED .......................................................................................... 6   1.5.1 THE LACK OF AWARENESS IN INFORMATION LITERACY ON THE LEVEL OF SOCIETY ........................ 6   1.5.2 THE LACK OF AWARENESS IN INFORMATION LITERACY BY POLITICIANS AND USERS ...................... 6   1.5.3 THE PROBLEM OF NOT ESTABLISHING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND INFORMATION LITERACY .................................................................................................. 7   1.5.4 THE LACK OF COOPERATION BETWEEN THE INSTITUTIONS CONNECTED WITH VOCATIONAL EDUCATION7  1.6 MODIFICATIONS/ADDITIONS SUGGESTED TO BEST PRACTICES / CASE STUDIES ...................... 7  1.7 FINALIZED BEST PRACTICES/CASE STUDIES FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION SECTOR ................. 7   THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE BEST PRACTISES LISTED ABOVE HAS BEEN APPROPRIATED AT THE WORKSHOP. .... 7  SECTION 2: DESCRIPTION OF THE “REAL-LIFE” IL ACTIVITIES IN EACH COUNTRYFOR EACH SECTOR...................................................................................................... 8  2.1 BRIEF OUTLINE OF POINTS DISCUSSED .......................................................................... 8   2.1.1 THE LACK OF BUDGET, TRAINERS AND CONTENT FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION .......................... 8   2.1.2 THE PROBLEM ABOUT INTEGRATION OF INFORMATION LITERACY INTO VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ....... 8   2.1.3 THE PROBLEM ABOUT THE LACK OF EFFECT OF THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TO CAREERS .............. 8   2.1.4 THE LACK OF INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS TO GIVE LESSON OF INFORMATION LITERACY IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................. 8  SECTION 3 CONCLUSIONS .......................................................................................... 9   3
    • SECTION 1: WORKSHOP [THE IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATIONLITERACY IN THE VOCATIONAL SECTOR]1.1. Venue; dates Turkish National Library Ankara-Turkey, 30 May 20111.2. Workshop Chair; workshop rapporteurs Prof. Dr. Bülent Yılmaz – Nevzat Özel1.3. Agenda/programme with speakers09.30 Registration and Opening Speeches10.00 Keynote Speech: “The Importance of Information Literacy” (Prof. Dr. Serap Kurbanoğlu, Hacettepe University Department of Information Management)10.45 Break11.05 “Vocational Education & Training” (Ass. Prof. Dr. Mersini Moreleli- Cacouris, Department of Library Science and Information Systems, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Greece)12.00 Break12.15 “What is EMPATIC Project?” (Prof. Dr. Bülent Yılmaz, Hacettepe University Department of Information Management)13.00 Lunch14.00 Workshop: “Vocational Education and Information Literacy” (Chairman: Prof. Dr. Bülent Yılmaz, Hacettepe University Department of Information Management)15.00 Break15.20 “Remarks and Evaluation” (Prof. Dr. Serap Kurbanoğlu, Hacettepe University Department of Information Management)16.00 Close1.4 Brief outline of points discussed1.4.1 Function of Information Literacy in Vocational Education (VET)At the workshop, the followings regarding the functions of information literacy in vocationaleducation have been determined: Information literacy; • is essential for productivity and efficiency at work. • is a main provision for personal and institutional development and lifelong learning. • is related to the concepts of ongoing education, lifelong learning, self-education. • facilitates the adaptation of changes/development at work. • provides the work force of high quality. • supports the economic growth. 4
    • 1.4.2 Situation of VET in TurkeyThe Ministry of National Education is responsible for VET in Turkey. It is under the authority ofa general manager in the Ministry. In addition, the municipalities, universities and trade unionsorganize VET activities.Some data on VET in Turkey are introduced as follows:Table 1. Numbers of Vocational Education in Turkey (2009)Vocational Education Total Male FemaleParticipant 7 062 429 3 725 436 3 336 993Teacher 92 976 53 673 39 303 Source: TÜİK 2011 (Turkish Statistical Year Book 2010. Ankara: TÜİK.) • The students attending Vocational Education (VET) is not low in number. • The number of males and females attending VET are nearby. • The lack of teacher is the main problem. There are 76 students per teacher.The distributions of VET activities in Turkey according to the institutions are presented in theTable 2.Table 2. VET Courses According to the Institutions in Turkey (2009)Institutions Course Number Participant NumberMunicipalities 11 726 359 116Ministries 6 236 334 616Universities 1 435 70 128Trade Unions 420 46 419TOTAL 19 817 810 279 Source: TÜİK 2011 • VET is mostly organized by municipalities. • The number of VET organized by ministries is near to that of municipalities. • VET activities organized by universities and trade unions are low in number.The distribution of courses arranged in Turkey according to the subjects is as follows:Table 3. VET Course Subjects in Turkey (2009)Subject Course NumbersGeneral 529Education 2 297Humanities/Art 5 862Social Sci./Business/Law 4 136Science/Mathematics/Computer Sci. 2 458 5
    • Engineering 1 456Agriculture 89Health 559Services 2431TOPLAM 19 817 • VET is mostly organized in the fields of Humanities/Art and Social Sciences/Business/Law. • The courses in the fields of Agriculture and Health are low in number. • The number of courses in the field of Engineering is not on the high level.1.4.3 Vocational Education Problems in Turkey The following points considering vocational education problems in Turkey have been discussed at workshop: • Institutional arrangements of vocational education complex • The VET sector is the least understood and most poorly defined education sector, facing also a status and image problem. • There are some problems with quality of VET • It is a problem that diversity in responsibility for VET development, management and policy strategies on the national level1.4.4 How could Information Literacy be integrated into Vocational Education inTurkey?One of the most important issues discussed at workshop is how information literacy could beintegrated into vocational education. In ongoing vocational education activities, informationliteracy is not a component or a subject of them. Attracting the attention of The Ministry ofEducation, municipalities and the other institutions to this issue and creating sensitivity havebeen suggested.1.5 Major issues identified1.5.1 The Lack of Awareness in Information Literacy on the level of SocietyOne of the most significant problems about VET in Turkey is the lack of awareness ininformation literacy on the level of society. The society has not conceived the importance ofinformation literacy yet. They do not think that the problems they face about utilizinginformation and communication technologies in social life are caused by the lack of informationliteracy.1.5.2 The Lack of Awareness in Information Literacy by Politicians and UsersThe lack of awareness in information literacy on the level of society is also seen for decisionmakers, politicians and users in Turkey. They are not aware sufficiently of how muchinformation literacy is important for society. Moreover, they have not completely realized thatpeople outside formal education can gain the competence of information literacy via VET. 6
    • 1.5.3 The Problem of Not Establishing Relationship between Vocational Educationand Information LiteracyThe fact that information literacy is or should be a part of vocational education (VET) is notknown in Turkey. In other words, information literacy has not been regarded as the field ofVET yet.1.5.4 The Lack of Cooperation between the Institutions Connected with VocationalEducationThere is not sufficient coordination and cooperation within and between related formal and civilinstitutions on VET. This leads to unproductiveness and extravagance in VET activities.1.5.5 The Lack of National Policy in the Subject of Vocational EducationThe other significant problem about VET in Turkey is lack of national policy in the subject ofvocational education. That is why, the VET activities can not disciplined and continued neatly,the cooperation between institutions can not be established, the fields lack of education cannot be determined and VET activities on national level can not be realized.1.6 Modifications/additions suggested to Best Practices / case studiesThe participants at the workshop have concerned with the following 3 best practises:1. Database of training offers/PARP - the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development: It hasbeen stated that this practice can be applied in Turkey and a database can be developed bythe Ministry of Education cooperating with Turkish Librarians’ Association and The Departmentsof Information Management at universities.2. Training-the-Trainers in Information Literacy/UNESCO: Since one of the most importantproblems in Turkey about VET is the lack of trainers about information literacy, it will bepossible to have trainers in that subject by a project. Also, that kind of project can supply thetrainers, who are still giving education, with educational support.3. Training of Information Professionals/UNESCO: It has been thought that informationprofessionals holding the most important role in the training of information literacy also neededucation in this subject. Information professionals can also be educated so as to giveeducation about information literacy.1.7 Finalized Best Practices/case studies for Vocational Education SectorThe improvement of the best practises listed above has been appropriated at the workshop. 7
    • SECTION 2: DESCRIPTION OF THE “REAL-LIFE” IL ACTIVITIES IN EACH COUNTRY FOR EACHSECTOR2.1 Brief outline of points discussed2.1.1 The Lack of Budget, Trainers and Content for Vocational EducationOne of the most significant points for VET in Turkey is the lack of budget, trainers andeducational content (material) for vocational education.2.1.2 The Problem about Integration of Information Literacy into Vocational EducationInformation literacy has not been included into VET yet in Turkey. Information literacy is not thought tobe a part of VET.2.1.3 The Problem about the lack of effect of the Vocational Education to CareersAttending vocational activities in Turkey does not lead to increase in salary and cause workersto find work and to be promoted. For this reason, people do not feel a desire to join VETactivities.2.1.4 The Lack of Information Professionals to Give Lesson of Information Literacy inVocational EducationInformation professionals to give lesson of information literacy in the scope of VET are not onlyinadequate in number but also have insufficient knowledge and competence in this subject. 8
    • SECTION 3 CONCLUSIONSIn the framework of the discussion made at the workshop, the following suggestions havebeen given on the subject of Information literacy in VET for Turkey. 1. Awareness of society, decision makers, politicians and users should be created about information literacy. In this context, the Ministry of Education, Turkish Librarians’ Association (TKD) and the Departments of Information Management at universities should cooperate with each other. 2. Information literacy should be integrated into the VET activities still arranged by municipalities, ministries, universities and the other institutions. In this framework, TKD should connect with municipalities and ministries 3. In cooperation with Turkish Librarians’ Association (TKD), the Departments of Information Management at universities should organize projects and curriculum about information literacy realizing the education of trainers. 4. The Departments of Information Management at universities should prepare educational contents/materials related to information literacy. 5. Turkish Librarians’ Association (TKD) should organize courses to provide people with competence in information literacy by cooperating with public libraries. 6. Enterprises by Ministries for the reflection of the attendance in education on information literacy and VET to the workers’ careers should be made. 7. International projects and cooperations concerning VET and information literacy should be developed. 9
    • http://empat-ic.eu/eng/ Project funded by the European Commission under the Lifelong Learning Programme This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot beheld responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 1