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Validation Report - Higher Education Sector

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Author: Carla Basili

Author: Carla Basili

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  • 1.                        Validation  Report    in  the  Higher  Education  Sector    Author:  Carla  Basili   Ver:  Final             This  project  has  been  funded  with  support  from  the  European  Commission    
  • 2. "This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. Thispublication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be heldresponsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein."
  • 3. 3EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY        The  present  report  constitutes  the  delivery  D5.2  of  the  Work  Package  5:  Validation.    The  core  objectives  of  the  EMPATIC  project  are  to:   -­‐ draw   together   and   valorise   the   results   of   previous   Information   Literacy   initiatives   and   projects  across  the  school,  university,  adult  and  vocational  learning  sectors;     -­‐ use   this   evidence   to   influence   policy   makers’   perceptions   and   actions   to   support   a   marked   increase  in  piloting  and  mainstreaming  of  Information  Literacy;   -­‐ have   a   significant   impact   on   validating   new   learning   paradigms   and   strategic   thinking   on   curriculum  reform.    Within   the   work   plan   of   EMPATIC,   Work   Package   5   aimed   to   validate   the   models,   standards,  performance  measures  and  case  approaches  developed  in  the  previous  work  packages.          Round-­‐table   workshops   were   facilitated   for   each   of   the   four   transversal   sectors,   bringing   together  invited   policy   makers   together   with   expert   stakeholders   (including   researchers   and   representatives  from  the  learning/teaching  professions).    Brief  summaries  of  each  workshop  are  provided,  together  with  outlines  of  key  issues  identified.      
  • 4. 4Table  of  ContentsEXECUTIVE  SUMMARY   ...................................................................................................................................  3  SECTION  1:  INTERNATIONAL  WORKSHOP  “INFORMATION  LITERACY  POLICIES:  METHODOLOGICAL  ASPECTS”,   TH24  MAY  2011,  ATHENS,  GREECE  ...................................................................................................................  6  1.1.  VENUE,  DATES,  WEBSITE,  AND  PARTICIPANTS  ............................................................................................................  6  1.2.  WORKSHOP  CHAIR,  COMMITTEE  AND  INVITED  SPEAKERS  ..........................................................................................  6  1.3.  PROGRAMME  WITH  SPEAKERS  ....................................................................................................................................  7  1.4  BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  POINTS  DISCUSSED  .........................................................................................................................  7   1.4.1  SCOPE  AND  RATIONALE  OF  THE  WORKSHOP  ..........................................................................................................  7   1.4.2  MODELS  OF  INFORMATION  LITERACY  POLICIES  IN  HIGHER  EDUCATION  ......................................................................  8   1.4.3  SELECTED  METHODOLOGICAL  ISSUES  IN  CREATING  THE  INFORMATION  LITERACY  DEVELOPMENT  STRATEGIES  ......................  8   .......  9   1.4.4  INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  THE  EUROPEAN  HIGHER  EDUCATION  AREA:  EPISTEMOLOGICAL  AND  THEORETICAL  ASPECTS   1.4.5  STRATEGIC  AND  INTERDISCIPLINARY  APPROACHES  TO  INFORMATION  LITERACY  SKILLS  ..................................................  9   1.4.6  ASSESSMENT  OF  INFORMATION  LITERACY  SKILLS,  SOME  EXPERIENCES  FROM  UNIVERSITY  OF  BERGEN  .............................  10   1.4.7  INFORMATION  LITERACY  STRATEGIES  AT  THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  CRETE  LIBRARY  .............................................................  10  1.5  MAJOR  ISSUES  IDENTIFIED  ..........................................................................................................................................  10  1.5.1  IS  INFORMATION  LITERACY  A  DISCIPLINE  OF  STUDY?  .............................................................................................................  11  1.5.2  CAN  INFORMATION  LITERACY  BE  INSERTED  INTO  UNIVERSITY  CURRICULA  LIKE  COMPUTER  SCIENCE?  ..............................................  11  1.5.3  HOW  CAN  BE  INFORMATION  LITERACY  INSERTED  INTO  THE  BOLOGNA  PROCESS?  ........................................................................  11  1.6  FINALIZED  BEST  PRACTICES/CASE  STUDIES  FOR  HIGHER  EDUCATION  SECTOR  ..........................................................  12  1.6.1  ALFIN-­‐EEES.  SKILLS  AND  COMPETENCES  IN  INFORMATION  MANAGEMENT  FOR  LEARNING  TO  LEARN  WITHIN  EUROPEAN  HIGHER  EDUCATION.  ........................................................................................................................  12   ........................................................................................................  13  1.6.2  GRADUATE  INFORMATION  LITERACY  MODULE  1.6.3  INFORMATION  LITERACY  PROJECT.  STAFFORDSHIRE  UNIVERSITY  ...........................................................................  14  1.6.4  MA  IN  INFORMATION  LITERACY.  UNIVERSITY  OF  SHEFFIELD  ...................................................................................  15  1.6.5  SWIM  STREAMING  WEBBASED  INFORMATION  MODULES.  SWIM  TUTORIAL  (INFORMATION  SEARCH  STRATEGY)  AALBORG   ..............................................................................................................................................................  15  UNIVERSITY  LIBRARY.  1.7  MODIFICATIONS/ADDITIONS  SUGGESTED  TO  CASE  STUDIES  .....................................................................................  17   1.7.1  POLICY  AWARENESS  IS  A  CRITICAL  ISSUE  .............................................................................................................  17   1.7.2  BOTH  SIDES  OF  EDUCATION  (TEACHING  AND  LEARNING)  TO  BE  ADDRESSED  ...............................................................  17   1.7.3  WHO  SHOULD  BE  RESPONSIBLE  FOR  TEACHING?  ..................................................................................................  17  SECTION  2:  DESCRIPTION  OF  THE  “REAL-­‐LIFE”  IL  ACTIVITIES  IN  THE  HIGHER  EDUCATION  SECTOR  .................  18  2.1  INTRODUCTION  ................................................................................................................................................................  18   .................................................................  18   2.1.1  INFORMATION  LITERACY  AND  THE  EUROPEAN  HIGHER  EDUCATION  AREA   2.1.2  INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  ROMANIA  ...............................................................................................................  18   2.1.3  INFORMATION  LITERACY  STRATEGIES  AT  UNIVERSITY  OF  CRETE  LIBRARY  ..................................................................  19  SECTION  3  CONCLUSIONS  .............................................................................................................................  21  
  • 5. 5APPENDICES  .................................................................................................................................................  22   ............................................................................  22  APPENDIX  1:  WORKSHOP  DOCUMENTS  PRESENTED  FOR  DISCUSSION  APPENDIX  2:  WORKSHOP  LIST  OF  PARTICIPANTS  .............................................................................................................  22  APPENDIX  3:  WORKSHOP  COPIES  OF  PRESENTATIONS  ....................................................................................................  23  APPENDIX  4:  COPIES  OF  PHOTOS,  PRESS  RELEASES  AND  MEDIA  COVERAGE  FROM  THE  WORKSHOP  ............................  23      
  • 6. 6SECTION  1:  INTERNATIONAL  WORKSHOP  “INFORMATION  LITERACY  POLICIES:  METHODOLOGICAL  ASPECTS”,  24TH  MAY  2011,  ATHENS,  GREECE    1.1.  VENUE,  DATES,  WEBSITE,  AND  PARTICIPANTS    Venue: The National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue -11635, Athens, GreeceDate: 24 May 2011Website: http://www.isast.org/qqml2011/keynotetalkssessions.htmlParticipants: about 30 people, researchers in the field of Information Literacy,academics and librarians from Canada, Egypt, Estonia, Greece, Hong kong, India, Iran,Israel, Italy, Japan, Poland, Spain, Sweden and Turkey.1.2.  WORKSHOP  CHAIR,  COMMITTEE  AND  INVITED  SPEAKERS  Workshop Chair: Professor Carla Basili, The National Research Council, Italy, TheEuropean network on Information Literacy (EnIL)  Workshop Committee: Professor Carla Basili, Professor Maria Próchnicka, ProfessorSabina Cisek, Professor Angela RepanoviciInvited International Speakers:Professor Armando Malheiro da Silva, Faculty of Humanities, University of Porto, PortugalArmando Malheiro da Silva is the coordinator of the eLit.pt project, which, althoughfocused on the specific case of Portugal, intents to make a scientific approach of thechallenges of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and its impact in the field ofthe information literacy, considering the actual context of the Information Society.Professor Angela Repanovici, Transilvania University of Brasov, RomaniaAngela Repanovici teaches in the University Transilvania of Brasov, Romania toMechanical Engineering Faculty. Her research is focused on information literacy,informatization systems, mechatronics systems used in archives and libraries, marketingresearch and scientometric studies. Since 2009, she is president of Information Literacysection of the Romanian Library Association and organizer of the First information literacyinternational conference in Romania on 2010.Dr. Ane Landoy, Bergen University Library, NorwayAne Landoy is member of the IFLA standing Committee on Academic and ResearchLibraries and her research concentrates on the assessment of information literacy skillsof university students, with particular focus on the different assessment methodologieswhich can be applied.Dr. Manolis Koukourakis, Crete University Library, GreeceManolis Koukourakis authored a number of papers describing his experience in theacademic project aimed at promoting and supporting information literacy in theUniversity of Crete.
  • 7. 71.3.  PROGRAMME  WITH  SPEAKERS  Opening and introductory remarksCarla Basili, National Research Council, Rome, ItalyModels of Information Literacy Policies in Higher EducationCarla Basili, National Research Council, Rome, ItalySelected methodological issues in creating the Information Literacy developmentstrategiesMaria Próchnicka, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, PolandInformation Literacy in the European Higher Education Area: epistemological andtheoretical aspectsArmando Malheiro da Silva, Faculty of Humanities, University of Porto, PortugalPANEL ON STRATEGIC AND INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLSStrategic and Interdisciplinary Approaches to Information Literacy SkillsAngela Repanovici: Transilvania University Brasov, RomaniaAssessment of information literacy skills, some experiences from University of BergenAne Landoy: Bergen University Library, NorwayInformation Literacy strategies at the University of Crete LibraryManolis Koukourakis: Crete University Library, Greece      1.4  BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  POINTS  DISCUSSED      1.4.1  Scope  and  rationale  of  the  workshop    Aim of the Workshop was to point out the strategic role of methodological approaches inInformation Literacy Policy Analysis. Policy formulation and implementation is a complexprocess, deeply rooted in awareness of problems and prediction of impacts.The latter element constitutes the most fragile side of the process, since even the bestmodel of prediction cannot cope against unexpected events. A vast amount of «policytheory» literature has been produced, which proposes different models for predictingrealistic system behaviours, without ever reaching a common consensus. Alternatively, amajor trend towards effective policy formulation is a pragmatic approach based onevidence: policies are adopted on the basis of «what works» rather than ideology orintuition. Despite its more pragmatic positioning with respect to policy theories, the
  • 8. 8evidence–based approach privileges data and data structures, which are analysedthrough a systematic process of enquiry. The methodological dimension is evidentlycrucial in this approach, as a way to perform policy analysis by applying scientific criteria.  1.4.2  Models  of  Information  Literacy  Policies  in  Higher  Education  Carla  Basili  Over last decades, a meaningful transformation has occurred in the organisation andoperation of the university system: a shift from a self-referential, auto-regulatorymanagement to a market-driven regime. These trends are confirmed for the EuropeanHigher Education by the position of the EC expressed through the Communication“Delivering on the modernisation agenda for universities: education, research andinnovation” where is underlined the “interlinked roles of education, research andinnovation” of universities and that Higher Education is a “crucial sector of the economyand of society”. This scenario leads to assign growing importance to the so-called“transversal or soft skills”, considered crucial in the moving from university to the labourmarket.Within this major goal and since the Lisbona strategy (2000), the Commission haspointed to three broad areas of reform in Higher Education:− curricular reform;− governance reform;− funding reform  The area of major concern for IL is the curricular reform, where a number of elementsare to be considered:− learning outcomes;− recognition of informal learning;− flexible, modernised curricula at all levels which;− correspond to the needs of the labour market (transversal skills)  1.4.3   Selected   methodological   issues   in   creating   the   Information   Literacy   development   strategies  Maria  Próchnicka,  Sabina  Cisek    In formulating strategies or strategic models for Information Literacy development twomain dimensions have to be considered, that is its formal structure, e.g. components,frame, length, appendices, and its subject content related to – inter alia – the level andcontext of Information Literacy, formal and informal learning environments, implicationsfor teaching.During the designing process the crucial elements of strategic modeling: 1. context(meaning and dimensions of IL, role in the civic/knowledge society), 2. mission(mainstreaming of information literacy at the national and EU level), 3. vision(information literate citizens, business, government, society), 4. goals (raising society-wide IL awareness, institutionalization of IL, integrating IL in curricula in all levels andsectors of education system in Europe), 5. actions, 6. standards and performanceindicators, and 7. stakeholders have to be taken into account.
  • 9. 9The analysis of 87 projects in the Information Literacy area from years 1994-2010,supported in most cases by the European Union, is used as the basis for developinggeneric strategic models for Information Literacy as well as defining its implications fortraining of teachers, IL standards and associated performance indicators.  1.4.4   Information   Literacy   in   the   European   Higher   Education   Area:   epistemological   and   theoretical  aspects  Armando  Malheiro  da  Silva    The eLit.pt project articulates along two important phases: diagnosis and design ofstrategies. Final aim is to define an information skill strategic plan in order to adapt thePortuguese universities to European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and Information Era.A further goal of the eLit.pt project is to sensitize academic and political authorities oninformation literacy problematic.The main questions that eLit.pt intents to answer are: understand how the universitystudents face the new competences required by the creation of the EHEA; know howthese students are prepared in terms of information competences, in three differentmoments, i.e., prior to the university, during the university frequency period and at theend of the university degree.An important part of the project is a survey based on a questionnaire including thefollowing four kinds of questions:Basic group: Included familiar and scholar context. We define context as a space wherethe students develop his/her information behaviour structure. Where they configure away to face to the information literacy.Functional group: Integrated by mediation role of institution as library and school.Transversal group: Included all the question relation with the way that students mixerand use diverse information. For example: information access, information evaluationand use.Introspective group: Internal mechanisms (motivations) linked with information needs.The results of the survey can be summarised in the following points: motivationdetermines information behaviour, information literacy in university’s students is betterthat high school students, students shows great familiarity with Information Technologiesbut still miss awareness of how to deal with the information reachable through thosetools.  1.4.5  Strategic  and  Interdisciplinary  Approaches  to  Information  Literacy  Skills  Angela  Repanovici  Angela Repanovici summarised the results of an exploratory workshop aimed atcapturing all aspects and issues in addressing Information Literacy in all fields ofknowledge. Focal points of the discussion: different educational approaches andinterdisciplinary elements among the following knowledge domains: human, medical,technical and economic sciences.    
  • 10. 101.4.6  Assessment  of  information  literacy  skills,  some  experiences  from  University  of  Bergen  Ane  Landoy  In many universities in Europe, the teaching of information literacy is the domain of thelibrary, in larger or smaller degree in cooperation with faculty. Information literacy maybe included as a small part of ordinary courses, or as a subject that the library hascontrol over. The information literacy skills of the students are therefore not assessedespecially. One of the consequences may be a lack of understanding of the importance ofinformation literacy skills among the students, and following lack of participation in thetraining opportunities. Pedagogical research has found that students place moreemphasis and more importance to subjects that are assessed and given feedback.Maybe, to find a way of assessing the information literacy skills will be one of the waysfor institutions of higher education to ensure that the students have these importantskills?Different assessment methods can be applied. Assessment must be depending on andclosely connected to the learning goals/learning outcomes.Assessment methods can be most useful and relevant, depending on whether the teacherof information literacy is the subject teacher or the librarian.  1.4.7  Information  Literacy  strategies  at  the  University  of  Crete  Library  Manolis KoukourakisLibraries have always been dealing with collecting, organizing, storing and providinginformation, as well as with instructing their patrons on how to use it effectively for theirown needs. As such, libraries are privileged players in the IL field, provided they canadapt the dynamics of new IT, tools and facilities and orient their services towardsinstructing their users to apprehend the possibilities of the new ways information isproduced and made available in the digital era.A prerequisite to achieve this goal is the comprehensive involvement of all agents of anacademic institution, in a common, collective effort for the overall re-organization of thestructures and services provided within the academic community. Within this approachthe University of Crete Library has developed strategies and practices to support andpromote information literacy.1.5  MAJOR  ISSUES  IDENTIFIED    The workshop was focused on the methodological issues behind the process of IL policyformulation in Europe. As starting point of the discussion, the Empatic’s framework(described in the Empatic deliverable D1.1) was used. The framework is shortly recalledbelow in its three different perspectives of analysis: Culture of Information, Education toInformation, Information Skills.Information Literacy as a discipline of study (Culture of Information) which is:− a branch of the documentation-information science domain;− a knowledge independent from every application domain;− a kind of transversal knowledge;− distinct from the Informatics culture
  • 11. 11Information Literacy as social objective (Education to Information) since it is:− a requisite of the Information Society;− an objective of educational policy;− a massive operation;− requires changes in the education systemInformation Literacy as cognitive acquisition of individuals (Information Skills)is− a set of Information competencies (or i-skills) that must be certificatedThis grid – that in D1.1 was given as a theoretical framework – at the test-bed of theworkshop revealed to be a valuable tool both for analysing IL within the European HigherEducation context, and for preparing the way to the policy recommendations to beaddressed in the Empatic final conference.With respect to the grid above summarised, the discussion concentrated in particular onthe following points.1.5.1  Is  Information  Literacy  a  discipline  of  study?  A strong assumption underlying the institutionalisation of IL is to recognise it as adiscipline in its own, to be conceived mainly as "knowledge" then as mere "ability",independent from any subject discipline, except for its applicative component, which canbe related to a specialised IL competency level.This point was the first addressed since it is the base for further analysis on how IL couldbe inserted into the Bologna process. A debate started as to consider IL a discipline orsimply a skill.1.5.2  Can  Information  Literacy  be  inserted  into  university  curricula  like  Computer  Science?  A major problem with IL is a diffused degree of misconception of the distinction betweenIL and Computer Literacy. The idea of replicating – mutatis mutandis – an institutionalconfiguration path similar to that of Computer Literacy can be suggested. Bothdisciplines, in fact, are transversal and useful to every course of study.1.5.3  How  can  be  Information  Literacy  inserted  into  the  Bologna  process?  The EU Higher Education landscape is governed by the Bologna Process, a processstarted in 1999 and aimed at creating a European Higher Education Area, in whichstudents can choose from a wide and transparent range of high quality courses andbenefit from smooth recognition procedures.
  • 12. 12In an ideal Bologna process for Information Literacy, a first step should be promotingamong academics and policy makers the awareness of both the need of IL and thedistinction between IL and Computer Literacy. A second step could be to insert IL amongthe learning outcomes of European universities and, particularly, among the so-called“generic instrumental competencies”. A viable solution could be to integrate the ACRLCompetency Standards for Higher Education into the Tuning project activities    1.6  FINALIZED  BEST  PRACTICES/CASE  STUDIES  FOR  HIGHER  EDUCATION  SECTOR    During  the  previous  stages  of  the  EMPATIC  project  five  IL  development  best  practices  for  the  Higher  Education   sector   have   been   chosen   and   described.   The   participants   were   mainly   attracted   by   the  focus   of   the   workshop   on   methodological   issues   of   Information   Literacy   policy   development.  Therefore,  they  concentrated  their  attention  on  these  aspects  more  than  on  the  deep  analysis  of  the  best  practices,  which,  anyway,  were  not  criticised  (see  section  1.7  below).  A  short  description  of  the  Higher  Education  best  practices  is  given  below.  1.6.1   ALFIN-­‐EEES.   SKILLS   AND   COMPETENCES   IN   INFORMATION   MANAGEMENT   FOR   LEARNING  TO  LEARN  WITHIN  EUROPEAN  HIGHER  EDUCATION  GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Country: Spain 2. Funding: the project is held by Universidad de Granada es Catedrática de Biblioteconomía y de Documentación from Granada, supported by Spanish Ministerio de Educacion and Spanish IL EHEA 3. Focus: project aimed at the development of IL as a social objective and as a cognitive acquisition of individuals. 4. Learning sector: Higher Education 5. Literacy area: IL with the impact on Computer Literacy and Digital Literacy. 6. Geographical/ social range: national. 7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: official (governmental) bodies and non-official bodies.CHARACTERISTICSConsortiumThe project is held by Universidad de Granada es Catedrática de Biblioteconomía y deDocumentación from Granada, Spain and represented by Prof. María Pinto Molina andsupported by Spanish Ministerio de Educatio and Spanish IL EHEA (Information LiteracyEuropean Higher Education Area)BackgroundALFIN-EEES is an initiative that proposes the implementation into the curricula andeducation so called GENERIC COMPETENCES related to the information literacy,developed and educated for any university student who needs to search for, to manage,to organize and to evaluate information gathered in very diverse sources.
  • 13. 13Core objectivesALFIN-EEES serves to promote the above mentioned literacy in information of those whoconsult it, multiplying the opportunities of electronic self-guided learning andimplementing resources and tools for learners, teachers and users development.DetailsAs generic target, ALFIN-EEES tries to form the student in the mastery of the followinggeneric competences: systemic, informative, personal and evaluative.The institutions, organizations and stakeholders that promote the project are: Nationalgovernments, parliaments and their official agencies and non official bodies likeacademia, LIS community, NGOs and professional bodies.1.6.2  GRADUATE  INFORMATION  LITERACY  MODULE    GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Country: Ireland 2. EU funding program: initiative of three collaborated universities with no funding from the UE 3. Focus initiative type: project aimed at development of IL as a discipline of study; as a social objective and as a cognitive acquisition of individuals. 4. Learning sector: HE- Higher Education 5. Information Literacy area: IL and its application to the research 6. Geographical/ social range: national 7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: official and non official bodies.  CHARACTERISTICSConsortiumThis initiative in promoted with no funding from the UE. This is the joint initiative of threeuniversities and university libraries: National University of Ireland Galway, Trinity CollegeDublin, and University College Cork. Initiative supported by Higher Education Authority (amember of international organization ENQA - the European Association for QualityAssurance in Higher Education and National Department Plan (NDP) TransformingIreland, the national investment programme 2007-2013NDP Transforming Ireland isFunded by the Irish Government and part financed by the European Union under theNational Development PlanBackgroundThe initiative is an attempt to establish the competence of the course trainee students atmaster, doctoral and young academic staff (post-doctoral). The module was incorporatedinto the curricula, and is the example resource of credited courses available atuniversities collaborating with one another. The project promotes the achievement ofeducational goals and strategies and curricula development.Core objectivesThe module is aimed at postgraduate research students completing a PhD or a ResearchMasters, as well as Post-Doctorate staff. It consists of 6 units in total, and each unit will
  • 14. 14introduce to the topic through a series of slides explaining the subject area, and providewith an opportunity to practice and explore its themes by means of short reflective tasks.This tutorial supplements the important work of the subject area librarian, and isdesigned to allow users to review the topic at the own convenience.DetailsThe project also develops and educates within the Information Literacy personal skillsand it is prepared for postgraduate research students completing a PhD or a ResearchMasters, as well as Post-Doctorate staff.1.6.3  INFORMATION  LITERACY  PROJECT.  STAFFORDSHIRE  UNIVERSITY  GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Country: Staffordshire, England. 2. EU funding program: non UE funding 3. Focus initiative type: project aimed at development of IL as a discipline of study and as a social objective. (R&D, surveys and theory development) 4. Learning sector: HE- Higher Education. 5. Information Literacy area: IL skills development 6. Geographical/ social range: local 7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: local and non official bodies.CHARACTERISTICSConsortiumThis initiative is held by the Staffordshire University, local and academic environment.BackgroundInformation literacy project at the Staffordshire University is a kind of strategic approachto integrating information literacy into the learning landscape, promoting educationalgoals and strategic and curricula development, implementing resources and tools forlearners, teachers, users development.The Statement of good practice have been implemented as a initiative in e-learning.Widening Participation and Quality can be supported by greater emphasis on informationliteracy. The information literacy statement can work in tandem with the e-learning policyand the employability policy to enrich and deepen the student experience of learning atStaffordshire University. This statement can be used to underpin modular undergraduatecourses, postgraduate courses, distance learning courses (both undergraduate andpostgraduate) and Staffordshire University Regional Federation SURF courses.Core objectivesResearches into various aspects of Information Literacy and its implementation that havebeen undertaken at the Staffordshire University are: ASK or the Assignment Survival Kit,embedded support sessions, information Skills module, VLE Folder support activity andStaffordshire University Information Literacy Community of Practice.
  • 15. 151.6.4  MA  IN  INFORMATION  LITERACY.  UNIVERSITY  OF  SHEFFIELD  GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Country: Sheffield, United Kingdom. 2. UE funding program: university initiative with no EU funding 3. Focus initiative type: project aimed at development of IL as a social objective. 4. Learning sector: HE- Higher Education 5. Information Literacy area: IL- Education with Computer Literacy, Digital Literacy, Internet Literacy, and Media Literacy. 6. Geographical/ social range: national, international. 7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: local and non official bodies.CHARACTERISTICSConsortiumThis project is a university initiative with non UE funding.BackgroundMA in Information Literacy it is the university initiative that gives the knowledge,understanding and skills to succeed in an exciting and fast-moving field. The University,Information School has a flexible approach to teaching and learning, and it is possible tostudy part time or full time, and take the programme as a Postgraduate Diploma orPostgraduate Certificate as alternatives to the full MA. It is also possible to choose tostudy individual modules, accumulating credits towards a qualification to be completedlater.Core objectivesThe course aims to develop specialist practitioners, who understand the theory andpractice of information literacy, and who are qualified and motivated to educate membersof the public in their lifelong development of information literacy skills. It provides an in-depth understanding of information literacy and information behaviour in differentcontexts, as well as preparing participants for roles as information literacy teachers.DetailsThe MA in Information literacy is divided into the core modules: Dissertation, Educationfor Information Literacy, Educational Informatics, Information Literacy Research,Information Resources and Information Literacy, Information Retrieval, ResearchMethods and Dissertation Preparation, Practical Computing.It is also divided into modules to be chosen.1.6.5  SWIM  Streaming  Web  based  Information  Modules.  SWIM  tutorial  (information  search   strategy)  Aalborg  University  Library.  GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Country: Denmark 2. EU funding program: the project is the national and local (Aalborg University) initiative funded by local and national organisations (Denmark’s Electronic Research Library)
  • 16. 16 3. Focus Initiative type: project aimed at development of IL as a social objective and as a cognitive acquisition of individuals. 4. Learning sector: HE- Higher Education 5. Information Literacy area: IL, Computer Literacy and Digital Literacy. 6. Geographical/ social range: local, national. 7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: non official bodies.CHARACTERISTICSConsortiumThe project and the tutorial was funded by Denmark’s Electronic Research Library anddeveloped by Aalborg University Library in collaboration with · The Aarhus School ofBusiness Library, The Royal Library, Roskilde University Library.− The project partners of the SWIM group are:− The Aarhus School of Business Library− The Royal Library− Roskilde University Library.BackgroundAalborg University Library is in charge of the SWIM project and its development, andworks in collaboration with the Aarhus School of Business Library, The Royal Library andRoskilde University Library that function as user test environments.In order to render the project visible, secure exposure, and further the exchange ofknowledge and interplay with other projects, the SWIM group has formed a number ofattachments to centres and institutions both within and outside Aalborg University. Thetype of attachment depends on the characteristics of the individual network partner.However, it will primarily involve sparring and the exchange of experiences in connectionwith specific problems.Core objectivesThe aim of the SWIM project is to develop a web-based multimedia programme thatfurthers the development of students information literacy skills. The programme isdesigned as a contextually relevant, interactive tutorial, which is divided into well-definedmodules and integrated in various web environments relevant to library users andteaching environments.The project objective is to support students in the acquisition of information literacyskills, particularly when using web-based information resources supported by DenmarksElectronic Research Library. The SWIM group will develop an easy to use tutorialconsisting of modules that relate to relevant information resources, thus offering the userthe possibility of just-in-time learning when using e.g. a specific database. Anotherobjective is to secure the integration and use of those information resources and facilitiesthat can be accessed through the research libraries in the teaching environments of thevarious educational institutions.DetailsThe indirect target group is the universities teaching environments, in connection withcurriculum planning and other activities that further the integration of information
  • 17. 17literacy in the learning process. Furthermore, the target group also includes a number ofdifferent users in various web environments e.g. The Virtual University of Denmark(DVUNI) and those involved in Denmarks Electronic Research Library.1.7  MODIFICATIONS/ADDITIONS  SUGGESTED  TO  CASE  STUDIES    The discussion on the Higher Education best practices selected in the previous phases ofthe EMPATIC project, besides the points described in the section 1.5 of this report, raisedthe following further issues.  1.7.1  Policy  awareness  is  a  critical  issue    The ALFIN-EEES case study (see 1.6.1) was appreciated as an example of involvement ofthe Ministry of Education as supporting body, and a variety of public and privatestakeholders as promoters.1.7.2  Both  sides  of  education  (teaching  and  learning)  to  be  addressed    The need to promote Information Literacy among both the teachers and the students(see 1.6.3) was recognised as a need, but quite difficult to reach, given the hard task ofmake academics being “receivers of education”.1.7.3  Who  should  be  responsible  for  teaching?  This point is also linked to the (still open) question of credit assignment or not to thediscipline. Among the best practices, the MA in Information Literacy (see 1.6.4) was anexample of a curricular initiative, while the SWIM tutorial (see 1.6.5) constitutes anexample of library initiative.
  • 18. 18SECTION   2:   DESCRIPTION   OF   THE   “REAL-­‐LIFE”   IL   ACTIVITIES   IN   THE  HIGHER  EDUCATION  SECTOR    2.1  Introduction    The key finding of the Arcadia Project at the Cambridge University Library (recentlyreleased on July 2011) can be summarised as follows.− the way in which information literacy is taught, structured and implemented is as important as the topics that are covered in any new curriculum;− information literacy needs to be embedded into the academic curriculum as far as possible;− it also needs to be ongoing throughout a student’s academic career and adapted according to the specific requirements of the discipline;− the curriculum needs to include opportunities for students to work collaboratively and to reflect on their learning;− it should be based on real needs, ideally following an audit;− meaningful assessment forms an important part of this curriculum, while recognising that information literacy can be difficult to assess summative. Therefore approaches such as peer assessment are key2.1.1  Information  Literacy  and  the  European  Higher  Education  Area    Based on contribution from Armando Malheiro da Silva and Viviana Fernández Marcial  (University of Coruña -Spain)It is nodal to consider the new educational environment - the European Higher EducationArea (EHEA) – focused on a different teaching-learning process based on: the activestudent’s participation in constructing their own knowledge; the promotion of continuoustraining and lifelong learning; the emphasis on the full integration of information andcommunication technologies in education systems, thus enabling a system of interactivelearning to take root; the creation of the ECTS (European Credits Transfer System) as anew measure that recognizes the students academic knowledge and brings majorchanges in the transmission and acquisition of knowledge when valuing the hours thestudent devotes to acquiring specific knowledge, rather than a definition based on thenumber of hours the lecturer teaches; the promotion of integrated education for thestudent, embracing the acquisition of generic, transversal and specific competences(knowledge, capacities and skills), in which access to and use of information isprioritized.2.1.2  Information  Literacy  in  Romania    Based on contribution from Angela RepanoviciIn Romania, IL developed very slowly. The Romanian library science has been veryreceptive to the requirements imposed by the development of informational society andimposed the implementation of the initial forma of education in the university centres:Bucuresti, Timisoara, Sibiu, Brasov, Targoviste.
  • 19. 19Likewise, the Library Association in Romania played a special part in specializing the staffwithin the libraries. With respect to the other professional categories, there has beenlittle done. During the initiation of a marketing research, with respect to the existencewithin the curricula for other specializations and fields of knowledge, there could benoted that there were singular cases in which the students have in the curricula coursesof information and documentation, that the libraries offer courses of initiation or thatthere are online tutorials aiming at initiating the search and the use f the informationalresources. Students in Romania prefer the Internet as information source accessed fromhome, however they are not acquainted with the rigorously scientific documentationsources, with the academic literature, with the scholar internet, with the invisible web,with the evaluation of the resources, with the ethic notions, with the plagiarism and thecommunication of the results in the scientific research. MECT started a praiseworthyaction, of professional reconversion of the schools librarians. The action of developmentof a new socio-professional category: documentaries teachers and professors hasimplications in the development of informational society, in the quality of the population’slife through obtaining the abilities of information, documentation, evaluation of theinformation starting from the pre-university education through developing pedagogicalabilities in the documentaries teachers and professors.Numerous researches and studies proved that youth, since young times, spend more andmore time interacting with the information and documentation technologies. There iscompulsorily necessary for the introduction of IL in education and schools curricula forgenerating the knowledge of the media role and of the information services.2.1.3  Information  Literacy  strategies  at  University  of  Crete  Library    Based on contribution from Manolis KoukourakisInformation Literacy at University of Crete Library has developed a comprehensive andintegrated approach that includes all library facilities, tools and services, extending fromlibrary premises to electronic tools design, and employs a multifaceted strategy, thatinvolves all UOC agents, in an effort to help users achieve information literacy, as a life-long process of turning information into knowledge. In this conception, the library is alively cell in the heart of the university, which at the same time is a meeting place, aplace for search and study, and a place to find help and instruction in study andresearch.A need exists to work with the university administration and the faculties in order toformally establish a course on information literacy either as a separate, core course inthe curricula (adapted for different faculties), or one 2-3 hours core session within eachcourse. A further need is to develop subject-focused, interactive training material, whichwill be available through our e-learning platform.The introduction and gradual implementation of Web 2.0 technologies, with its newfunctionality (blogs, wikis, mobile access, etc.) and even wider integration andtransparency of electronic tools and resources provides a groundbreaking opportunity inonline education and makes discernible a new e-space in education and the libraryhorizon. In such a new library environment the various Library Information Systems &metasearch tools are going to be replaced by or transformed to Content ManagementSystems, which will deal with the various resources in a more comprehensive way. In thebroader academic environment, the teacher-centered education system is graduallygiving its place to a collaborative, student-centered education model, which uses “onlinetechnology to enrich education and foster relationships among students, faculty, anduniversities”. Organized in the form of Virtual Learning Environments, this collaborativedistance education model “will increase the quality, accessibility, and diversity of onlineeducation opportunities”. In the library world, Digital Learning Object Repositories willintegrate with Learning Management Systems, to provide re-usable and adaptable (even
  • 20. 20versioned for different courses) learning objects, shaping a very flexible and effectiveeducation platform.Libraries thus seem to still be a critical agent in the information society and the reshapededucation system, crucially supporting the education process and even contributing tonewly developed curricula. Their only way of proceeding in this rapidly changinginformation era is to reflectively accept innovation, activating their long experience inhandling and providing information resources, as well as in user instruction, to facilitateimplementation of new technologies into sustained educational practice.
  • 21. 21SECTION  3  CONCLUSIONS      The  discussion  in  the  workshop  was  deeply  rooted  in  the  EMPATIC  framework  of  analysis,  which  has  been  tested  and  verified  in  its  consistency.    Attempting  a  rude  SWOT  analysis,  the  main  points  raised  can  be  summarised  as  follows.  Strengths  Information   Literacy   is   internationally   recognised   as   a   requisite   of   the   Information   Society   and   of   the  Knowledge  Economy.  Labour   market   requires   flexibility   in   terms   of   professional   self-­‐requalification   and   lifelong   learning  attitude.  This,  in  turn,  requires  –    inter  alia  –  to  dominate  the  current  information  environment.    Weaknesses  Lack  of  awareness  about  the  nature  of  IL  and  its  differentiation  with  respect  to  Computer  Literacy.  Being  able  to  catch  information  from  the  network  is  considered  enough.    Opportunities  The   whole   Higher   Education   landscape   in   the   European   Union   is   in   a   time   of   deep   reconfiguration  through   the   Bologna   process   and   this   fact   can   be   a   very   good   opportunity   for   suggesting   entering  Information  Literacy  in  the  ongoing  curricular  reform.      Threats  Academic   staff   can   be   resistant   in   accepting   IL   as   a   new   discipline   or   even   as   a   part   of   their   own  discipline.  When   the   responsibility   of   teaching   is   in   charge   of   the   library   staff,   academics   can   be   resistant   in  assigning  credits.      
  • 22. 22APPENDICES    APPENDIX  1:  WORKSHOP  DOCUMENTS  PRESENTED  FOR  DISCUSSION    The  workshop  documents  presented  for  discussion  are  available  online  through  the  webpage  in  English    APPENDIX  2:  WORKSHOP  LIST  OF  PARTICIPANTS     International Workshop “Information Literacy POLICIES: Methodological aspects”List of participants with affiliations: Name Affiliation e-mail   Axelsson Marie-Louise Linkoping University marie.louise.axelsson@liu.se   Library, Sweden Balta Kyriaki University of balta@uom.gr   Macedonia Hatzilia Margarita Atei of Thessalonika hatzilia@admin.teithe.gr   Monika Jagiellonian University monika.krakowska@uj.edu.pl   Krakowska Institute of Information and Library Science Suchojad Dr. Henryk Jan Kochanowski henryk.suchojad@ujk.edu.pl   University in Kielce The Main Library, Poland Aharony Noa Bar-Ilan University aharonn1@mail.biu.ac.il   Basili Carla CNR, Italy c.basili@ceris.cnr.it   Brage Christina Linkoping University christina.brage@liu.se   Library, Sweden Cavaller Victor Open University of vcavaller@gmail.com   Catalonia Cuturic Daniel Tallin University, amenotis_ehnaton@hotmail.com   Estonia Della Seta Maurella Istituto Superiore di maurelladellaseta@iss.it   Sanità, Rome, Italy Duncan Vicky University of Vicky.Duncan@usask.ca   Saskatchewan, Canada Houlihan Meggan The American mhoulihan@aucegypt.edu   University of Cairo, Egypt Koryanska Agniesrka Jagiellonian University koragnes11@wp.pl   Institute of Information and Library Science
  • 23. 23 Kurbanoglu Serap Hacettepe University serap@hacettepe.edu.tr   Department of Information Management Lakshmana Nithin Tallin University, nithinlaxman@gmail.com   Estonia Nagasawa Tayo Mie University, Japan ici43543@nifty.com   Peony Tai University of Hong peony_tai@hku.hk   Kong Libraries Pietruch- Diana Jagiellonian diana.pietruch.reires@uj.edu.pl   Reires University, Cracov Samanian Dr. M. Islamic Azad   University Bojnourd Branch Singh D.K. Banaras dksingh5@yahoo.com   Hindu University, India Tkacz Aneta Main Library of the Jan anetatkacz@ujk.edu.pl   Kachanowski University in Kielce Vahdat Mehrnoosh Tallin University, mehrvah@gmail.com   Estonia Zupan Vesna The "Svetozar buzupan@rcub.bg.ac.rs   Markovic" University Library, Belgrade        APPENDIX  3:  WORKSHOP  COPIES  OF  PRESENTATIONS    The  workshop  presentations  are  available  online  through  the  webpage  in  English      APPENDIX   4:   COPIES   OF   PHOTOS,   PRESS   RELEASES   AND   MEDIA   COVERAGE   FROM   THE  WORKSHOP    The  workshop   p h o t o s  are  available  online  through  the  webpage  in  English    
  • 24. 24                             http://empat-­‐ic.eu/eng/   Project  funded  by  the  European  Commission   under  the  Lifelong  Learning  Programme          

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