Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Validation Report - Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Sector

1,482

Published on

Authors: Anthi Katsirikou, Christos Skiadas, Aristeidis Meletiou

Authors: Anthi Katsirikou, Christos Skiadas, Aristeidis Meletiou

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,482
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.                        Validation  Report    Adult/  Lifelong  Learning  Sector  Authors:  Anthi  Katsirikou,  Christos  Skiadas,  Aristeidis  Meletiou   Ver:  Final             This  project  has  been  funded  with  support  from  the  European  Commission    
  • 2. "This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. Thispublication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be heldresponsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein."
  • 3. EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  The  present  report  constitutes  the  delivery  D5.2  of  the  Work  Package  5:  Validation.    The  core  objectives  of  the  EMPATIC  project  are  to:   -­‐ draw   together   and   valorise   the   results   of   previous   Information   Literacy   initiatives   and   projects   across  the  school,  university,  adult  and  vocational  learning  sectors;     -­‐ use  this  evidence  to  influence  policy  makers’  perceptions  and  actions  to  support  a  marked  increase   in  piloting  and  mainstreaming  of  Information  Literacy;   -­‐ have  a  significant  impact  on  validating  new  learning  paradigms  and  strategic  thinking  on  curriculum   reform.    Within  the  work  plan  of  EMPATIC,  Work  Package  5  aimed  to  validate  the  models,  standards,  performance  measures  and  case  approaches  developed  in  the  previous  work  packages.          Round-­‐table  workshops  were  facilitated  for  each  of  the  four  transversal  sectors,  bringing  together  invited  policy   makers   together   with   expert   stakeholders   (including   researchers   and   representatives   from   the  learning/teaching  professions).    Brief  summaries  of  each  workshop  are  provided,  together  with  outlines  of  key  issues  identified.  
  • 4. Table  of  Contents  EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  ...............................................................................................................................................  1  SECTION  1:  INTERNATIONAL  WORKSHOP  “INFORMATION  LITERACY  (IL),  THE  CORE  OF  THE  LIFELONG  LEARNING   TH(LLL)”,  27  MAY  2011,  ATHENS,  GREECE  ....................................................................................................................  4   ..........................................................................................................................  4  1.1.  VENUE,  DATES,  WEBSITE,  AND  PARTICIPANTS  1.2.  WORKSHOP  CHAIR,  COMMITTEE,  RAPPORTEUR  AND  INVITED  SPEAKERS  ...................................................................................  4  1.3.  AGENDA/PROGRAMME  WITH  SPEAKERS  ................................................................................................................................  4   .....................................................................................................................................  5  1.4  BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  POINTS  DISCUSSED   1.4.1  THE  WORKSHOP  AIMED  AT:  ..........................................................................................................................................  5   1.4.2.  FUNCTION  OF  INFORMATION  LITERACY  IN  ADULT/  LIFELONG  LEARNING  SECTOR  ....................................................................  5   1.4.3    SITUATION  OF  LLL  IN  GREECE  ......................................................................................................................................  5   1.4.3  LIFELONG  LEARNING  EDUCATIONAL  PROGRAMS  IN  GREECE:  PROBLEMS  AND  DISCUSSION  TOPICS:  ..............................................  8   1.4.4  THE  INCLUSION  OF  IL  INTO  THE  LLL  ................................................................................................................................  8  1.5  MAJOR  ISSUES  IDENTIFIED  ............................................................................................................................................  8   1.5.1  THE  AWARENESS  IN  INFORMATION  LITERACY  ON  THE  LEVEL  OF  SOCIETY  ................................................................................  8   1.5.2   THE   DIFFICULTY   OF   INFORMATION   LITERACY   CHANNELS   TO   SPREAD   WIDELY   THE   ROLE   AND   THE   NECESSITY   OF   THE   INFORMATION   LITERACY  ...........................................................................................................................................................................  9   1.5.3.  THE  ATTITUDE  OF  POLITICIANS  AND  DECISION  MAKERS  IN  THE  EFFECT  OF  IL  IN  THE  SOCIAL  COHERENCE  .......................................  9   1.5.4  THE  UNDERESTIMATION  OF  IL  COURSES  IN  BOTH  FORMAL  AND  INFORMAL  EDUCATIONAL  SECTORS.  .............................................  9   EXCEPT   OF   ACADEMIC   LIBRARIES   NO   OTHER   EDUCATIONAL   UNIT   HAS   INVOLVED   THE   IL   INTO   CURRICULUM   IN   GREECE.   THE   INFORMATION   LITERACY   STARTS   AT   THE   PRIMARY   SCHOOLS,   SO   THE   ESTABLISHMENT   OF   LIBRARIES   AT   PRIMARY   EDUCATIONAL   LEVEL   IS   ESSENTIAL.     GENERALLY   SPEAKING,   PARTICIPANTS   FROM   EUROPEAN   AND   NON   EUROPEAN   COUNTRIES   AGREED   THAT   THE   IL   PROCESS   IS   PROBLEMATIC   OUTSIDE  OF  THE  FORMAL  EDUCATION.   .....................................................................................................................................  9   1.5.5.  LACK  OF  COORDINATION  AND  COOPERATION  AMONG  THE  STAKEHOLDERS  OF  THE  PROJECTS.  ....................................................  9   1.5.6  THE  LACK  OF  NATIONAL  POLICY  ON  THE  LIBRARIES  COOPERATION.  .......................................................................................  9   1.5.7.  THE  CENTRAL  ROLE  OF  THE  LIBRARIANS.  .........................................................................................................................  9   .....................................................................................  10  1.6  MODIFICATIONS/ADDITIONS  SUGGESTED  TO  CASE  STUDIES   ..............................................  10   1.6.1.  ENTITLE  –  EUROPE’S  NEW  LIBRARIES  TOGETHER  IN  TRANSVERSAL  LEARNING  ENVIRONMENT:   1.6.2.  INFORMATION  AND  MEDIA  LITERACY  /UNESCO:  .........................................................................................................  10   ..............................................................................................  10   1.6.3.  IFAP  –  INFORMATION  FOR  ALL  PROGRAMME  /UNESCO:   1.6.4.  STATISTICAL  LITERACY  ..............................................................................................................................................  11   1.6.5.  WKLUCZAMY.PL  .................................................................................................................................................  11  1.7  FINALIZED  BEST  PRACTICES/CASE  STUDIES  FOR  ADULT/  LIFELONG  LEARNING  SECTOR  ....................................................................  11   1.7.1.  ENTITLE  –  EUROPE’S  NEW  LIBRARIES  TOGETHER  IN  TRANSVERSAL  LEARNING  ENVIRONMENT  ..............................................  11   1.7.2  INFORMATION  AND  MEDIA  LITERACY.  UNESCO  ..............................................................................................................  13   1.7.3  IFAP  –  INFORMATION  FOR  ALL  PROGRAMME  ...............................................................................................................  15   1.7.4  STATISTICAL  LITERACY  ...............................................................................................................................................  17   1.7.5  WKLUCZAMY.PL  ..................................................................................................................................................  18  SECTION  2:  DESCRIPTION  OF  THE  “REAL-­‐LIFE”  IL  ACTIVITIES  IN  EACH  COUNTRY  FOR  EACH  SECTOR  .........................  21  2.1    BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  POINTS  DISCUSSED  ..................................................................................................................................  21   2.1.1  THE  LACK  OF  BUDGET  AND  HUMAN  RESOURCES  FOR  IL  COURSES  IN  LLL  /ADULT  EDUCATION  .................................................  21   2.1.2  THE  PROBLEM  ABOUT  INCLUDING  INFORMATION  LITERACY  INTO  THE  CURRICULUM  OF  ALL  EDUCATIONAL  LEVELS.  .......................  21   2
  • 5. 2.1.3   PUBLIC   LIBRARIES,   LIFELONG   LEARNING   AND   INFORMATION   LITERACY   OR   THE   NECESSITY   OF   PUBLIC   LIBRARIES   TO   PLAY   THEIR   INNOVATIVE  ROLE.  ............................................................................................................................................................  21   2.1.4  THE  NECESSITY  OF  PROMOTION  AND  ADVERTISEMENT  OF  IL  IN  LLL  AND  ADULT  EDUCATION.  ...................................................  21  SECTION  3:  CONCLUSIONS  .......................................................................................................................................  22  APPENDICES  ............................................................................................................................................................  23  APPENDIX  1:  WORKSHOP  DOCUMENTS  PRESENTED  FOR  DISCUSSION  ...........................................................................  23  APPENDIX  2:  WORKSHOP  LIST  OF  PARTICIPANTS  ............................................................................................................  23  APPENDIX  3:  WORKSHOP  COPIES  OF  PRESENTATIONS  ....................................................................................................  24  APPENDIX  4:  COPIES  OF  PHOTOS,  PRESS  RELEASES  AND  MEDIA  COVERAGE  FROM  WORKSHOPS  .................................  24   3
  • 6. SECTION   1:   INTERNATIONAL   WORKSHOP   “INFORMATION   LITERACY   (IL),  THE   CORE   OF   THE   LIFELONG   LEARNING   (LLL)”,   27TH   MAY   2011,   ATHENS,  GREECE    1.1. Venue, dates, website, and participantsVenue: The National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vassileos ConstantinouAvenue - 11635, Athens, GreeceDate: Athens, Greece, 27 May 20111.2. Workshop Chair, Committee, RaPPORTEUR and invited speakersWorkshop Chair: Prof. Dr. Christos H. Skiadas, Director,Data Analysis and ForecastingLaboratory, Technical University of Crete, 73100 Chania Crete Greece, skiadas@asmda.netWorkshop rapporteur – Anthi Katsirikou, Librarian, PhD, MSc, Director, University of PiraeusLibrary (anthi@unipi.gr, anthi@asmda.com)Workshop Committee: Prof. Christos Skiadas (skiadas1@otenet.gr), Dr Anthi Katsirikou,Aristeidis Meletiou (MSc) (amlet@ict.tuc.gr), Ageliki Oikonomou (MSc) (angie@unipi.gr).Keynote speaker: Mersini Moreleli-Cacouris, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Library Science andInformation Systems, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Greece.Title: Learning How to Learn: Information Literacy for Lifelong MeaningInvited International Panelists (in alphabetical order):Professor Albert Boekhorst (The Netherlands)Professor Serap Kurbanoglu (Turkey)Helen Mamma, MSc (Greece)Anna Lucia Terra (Portugal)George Zachos, PhD (Greece)1.3. Agenda/programme with speakers09.30 Registration and10.00 Opening Speeches12.00 Anthi Katsirikou: About EMPATIC PROJECT12.40 Keynote Speech Mersini Moreleli-Cacouris: Learning How to Learn: Information Literacy for Lifelong Meaning13.40 Lunch15.00 Christos H. Skiadas Round table discussion17.00 Close 4
  • 7. 1.4 Brief outline of points discussed1.4.1 The workshop aimed at: - Seeking ways to involve IL in the Lifelong learning procedures and defining this role. - Exchanging ideas and opinions among different target groups, about the integration of IL into LLL. - Discussing strategies and programs of Information Literacy (IL) development in the LLL sector across the EU and abroad. - Validating the EMPATIC products up to date, in particular the Deliverables 4.1 and 4.2, related to IL development strategies as well as IL standards and performance indicators, and examples of good IL practice (cases).1.4.2. Function of Information Literacy in Adult/ Lifelong Learning SectorAt the workshop, the followings regarding the functions of information literacy in adult /lifelonglearning sector have been determined: Information literacy in this sector; • Is essential for the development, prosperity and freedom of people. • Contributes to the personal, social, occupational and educational level of people and individuals. • is related to the concepts of ongoing education, self-education, vocational training. • Facilitates the adaptation of changes/development at work. • Effects the productivity and work efficiency and contributes to the improvement of the quality. • Is essential for people and organisations to survive and develop themselves. • Supports the economic growth. • Information literacy is, therefore, a basic human right that promotes social inclusion in all nations. (IFAP mid-term strategy 2008-2013)1.1.4.3 Situation of LLL in GreeceLifelong learning is an important educational sector in Greek non-formal educational system.Some years before more than one Ministries developed LLL programs, such as the Ministry ofLabour, the Ministry of Public Administration, Governance and the Ministry of NationalEducation and Religious Affairs.The present Government decided that the LLL is a crucial factor for the development of thecountry and the improvement of social inclusion and cohesion. That’s why they renamed theMinistry of National Education to the Ministry of Education and Lifelong Learning and ReligiousAffairs and established a General Secretary under the Minister responsible for the LLL inGreece.Doing so, they managed to concentrate the initiatives and the projects under oneadministrative unit and to equally distribute the resources and avoid reduplications in actions.The General Secretary on LLL is responsible for two major actions/ categories of LLL1 Source: Unesco portal: http://portal.unesco.org/.../12114609343ifap.../ifap_draf_strategic_plan.pdf 5
  • 8. 1. The Institute of continuing education of adults. Its aim is the socio-technological support of the LLL projects and the implementation of actions relative to the Lifelong learning. So, the Institute supports the operation of the LLL establishments and the stand alone educational projects that are spread in all over Greece. The establishments are: • Centers for Adult Education, • Of Second Chance Schools, • Academies for Parents, The Stand Alone Projects: • Learning the Greek as the second language for immigrants, • Adult education in risk management, crises and emergency response and disaster (VOLUNTEERISM), • Adult learning in basic skills in new technologies, • Training farmers to take action in secondary and tertiary sectors of the economy, • Health Education, • Research and pilot projects. 2. The Prefectural Committees of Adult Education (NELE) constitute independent public authorities of the Prefectures that organize and promote training programs. Representatives of the local administrative bodies and Authorities constitute the Board of NELE, but the decision is made by the Head of the Prefecture. The responsibilities consist of coordinating the educational work at county level (approval training courses, hiring instructors, etc.), in accordance with local needs and directions of the General Secretary. The implemented projects are in the following disciplines: • Culture – Arts, • Social Economy – Entrepreneurship, • Political action, • Projects for People with Disabilities,"Certificate of Training" is issued for all the projects.The actions of the General Secretary are completed by two main actions: 1. Planning and Implementation of Distance learning programs for the LLL Instructors and trainers. 2. Planning and Implementation of Distance Lifelong learning programs.The first is the base line, the infrastructure of the LLL educational projects and administrativesystem and the second uses the ICT to the training programs.Under this administrative organization a lot of projects run in a decentralised scheme. TheGeneral Secretary of LLL services the legal frame, the strategy, the goals and the vision, andthe coordination among different organizations.According to Eurostat, Greece is not in a high status:2Lifelong learning (% of the population aged 25 to 64 participating in education and training).Greece has a rate 1,8 (2004) and 3,3 (2009). The highest European rate is Switzerland: 28,4(2004) and 24 (2009) and the rate in Euro-area is 7,3 and 8 respectively.2 Eurostat, statistics in focus, 44/2009. See also MAKING LIFELONG LEARNING A REALITYparticipation in learning for various age groups of the population. Available at http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/.../reality_en.pdf. andhttp://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/tgm/table.do?tab=table&init=1&plugin=1&language=en&pcode=tsiem080. 6
  • 9. In addition, the Ministry gives great importance in evaluating and measuring the quality ofLifelong Learning. The working package of 2009 – 2010 & 2011 – 2012 refer to: 1. Widening Access of citizens to the public services, 2. Promoting Career Management Skills, 3. Cooperation and coordination mechanisms in guidance, practice and policy development, and 4. Quality assurance / evidence based practice and policy.The Ministry of Education and Lifelong learning and Religious Affairs is in the process of theplanning of the Quality standard, the Quality criteria, the Quality Indicators, the benchmarks ofthe LLL. The active participation of citizens is necessary. 7
  • 10. 1.4.3 Lifelong Learning Educational programs in Greece: Problems and discussiontopics: • Institutional arrangements of lifelong learning projects are even now complex and bureaucratic. • Although Lifelong learning or Adult education traditionally concerned more with social, political, personal, and cultural development than with economic development and employability (Moreleli- Kakouri, 2011)3, the most famous actions are relevant to the job finding and money earning. The least famous actions are the social and volunteering ones. Lifelong learning is not widely considered as an educational branch, but as the impulsive force against unemployment. In that case lifelong learning doesn’t lend prestige to and social recognition. • There are no widely accepted common quality standards up to now; therefore the problem is in the way that the projects carried out. • The adoption of the Information Literacy outside formal education is problematic.1.4.4 The inclusion of IL into the LLLThe workshop discussed this matter. What proposed is the planning of a campaign to theGeneral Council of the Archives, Libraries and educational tv programs and other relevantorganizations and agencies in every level of the implementation of LLL projects. The campaignwill focus on the benefits of IL. Perhaps the best advertisement would be the application in anindividual course and the sharing of educational results in comparison with other projects. Themajor problem that the solution faces is the absence of libraries in the small traininginstitutions.1.5 MAJOR ISSUES IDENTIFIEDThe discussion among participants focused on the difficulties of IL inclusion in the curriculum.The panellists pointed out that non only Life Long learning sector but even Formal Educationsectors underestimate the effect of IL in the learning process. Both Foreign (European and nonEuropean) and Greek participants agreed and exchange ideas how to face it. The differentpersonal IL experiences were reflected to the problems and the opinions expressed. Some ofthe major topics are the following:1.5.1 The Awareness in Information Literacy on the level of SocietySociety is not persuaded on the significance of information literacy yet. They don’t realize thatsome of their problems they face in their social and working life, about utilizing informationand communication technologies could be solved by the information literacy. So, the majorproblem is how to make people to realize what they need. The workshop invoked the slogan ofUnesco “The four pillars of Education: Learning to know, Learning to do, Learning to livetogether, Learning to be” in order to point out that both people and organisations needknowledge on themselves, their physical environment, and their social environment in order tobe more capable to survive and develop more advantages. Different specialized terms anddisciplines have created, such as: Digital literacy, Health literacy, Computer literacy, Advancedand Basic literacy, Community literacy, Critical literacy, Cultural literacy, Emergent literacy,Family literacy, Media Literacy, Political Literacy, business literacy.3 Mersini Moreleli-Cacouris: Learning How to Learn: Information Literacy for Lifelong Meaning. Keynote speech toEmpatic workshop on IL the core of LLL. Athens, 27 May 2011. 8
  • 11. 1.5.2 The difficulty of Information Literacy channels to spread widely the role and thenecessity of the information literacyA problem that stated was how all this discussion and research about IL may affect thedecisions of politics and real life (schools, educations, jobs, employees etc). How can we findthe channels of transferring the knowledge to other social groups? It would be the solution ofthat problem if Greek public libraries would be strong enough to undertake the role andresponsibility they ought to develop manage and implement LLL projects.1.5.3. The attitude of politicians and decision makers in the effect of IL in the socialcoherenceNational governments have a specific responsibility: They determine the form and content ofthe educational system in which pupils are prepared for their future lives as responsible andparticipative citizens. If we connect this to the employment, this is a good way to persuadedecision makers and people to accept IL. As things change gradually, the prerequisite is tochange the way of teaching, how libraries see themselves and the library environment.1.5.4 The underestimation of IL courses in both formal and informal educationalsectors.Except of Academic libraries no other educational unit has involved the IL into curriculum inGreece. The information Literacy starts at the primary schools, so the establishment oflibraries at primary educational level is essential. Generally speaking, participants fromEuropean and non-European countries agreed that the IL process is problematic outside of theformal education.1.5.5. Lack of coordination and cooperation among the stakeholders of the projects. The most of the LLL projects, such as the curriculums in basic, secondary and highereducation, are designed without a library professionals’ involvement. This is the core of theproblem. As nobody knows the importance of IL nobody includes it. That’s why the activityabout information literacy is very little. Schools and universities can provide informationliteracy support and instruction during years of formal education but do not serve individuals inthe subsequent years of informal or self-directed study or life. And of course, there is a matterwith citizens who are not affiliated with a school anymore or who have never attendedsecondary/post secondary education.1.5.6 The Lack of National Policy on the Libraries cooperation.Another significant problem is the lack of national policy in libraries’ innovative role and the IL.Actually the cooperation between different kinds of libraries is not legislated. The IL is notlegislated to be included in the curriculum and it is an initiative of individual educators. That’swhy the most students don’t follow the educators’ IL program, even though they don’t knowhow to search, retrieve, evaluate, use information sources and the information itself.Nevertheless, the IL would be recognized if tutors and professors used it.1.5.7. The central role of the librarians.“In the …. library setting, librarians can enhance social capital by collaborating with … andother … constituencies, immersing themselves in … and community life, bridging the gaps …,and working … to create authentic learning experiences in which individuals’ development ofinformation literacy competencies is inextricably linked to learning about the world and ways ofparticipating productively in it” (Stevens &Campbell, 2006)4 Librarians are:4 Stevens, C.R. & Campbell, P.J. (2006). “Collaborating to connect global citizenship, information literacy, and lifelonglearning in the global studies classroom.” Reference Services Review, 34(4), 536-556. UNESCO (2003) UIE AnnualReport. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014/001493/149312e.pdf. Referred by Moreleli-Cacouris (2011). 9
  • 12. • Key players in information literacy program development, • Be involved in teaching, • Cater for students’ learning needs, • Be visible in the academic community and participate in educational activities. • Strong organization is important so Libraries participate as players to the cooperation for IL projects. Librarians have to incorporate faculty, to persuade faculty and policy makers to include IL competencies.1.6 MODIFICATIONS/ADDITIONS SUGGESTED TO CASE STUDIESThe participants at the workshop discussed on the following case studies:1.6.1. ENTITLE – Europe’s New Libraries Together in Transversal LearningEnvironment:The website is available on: http://www.entitlelll.eu/eng. The core document is the expert-validated impact assessment framework designed for use at institutional, regional/nationallevel in supporting quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the impact of libraries learningactivities and services on learning participation.The workshop suggested that this practice is adoptable this practice and promote it to thestakeholders that plan and implement educational strategies and IL projects in Greece, such asthe Ministry of Education, Lifelong Learning and Religious affairs, the Academic Libraries andthe Departments of Library and Information Science at Higher Education Institutions.1.6.2. Information and Media Literacy /UNESCO:The project contributes to the spread of information and media literacy in lifelong learning. Theproliferation of mass media has brought about decisive changes in human communicationprocesses and behaviour. Media education aims to empower citizens by providing them withthe competencies, attitudes and skills necessary to comprehend media functions. Mediaeducation can be contextualized within two UNESCO advocacies - the human rights basedapproach to programming and the creation of Knowledge Societies. Access to quality mediacontent and participation in programming are principles that are among the cornerstones ofthe universal right to free expression.5Media Literacy projects could be created by the university departmental libraries of MassMedia, in collaboration between faculty staff and librarians. It is a kind of literacy that is closedconnected to political and social awareness and consciousness. The departmental librariesshould undertake the responsibility to design training courses for librarians. The workshopapproved cooperative and communicative actions, one of them is to share this information thedepartmental libraries.1.6.3. IFAP – Information For All Programme /UNESCO:UNESCO’s Information for All Programme (IFAP) wishes to encourage communities usinginformation for development to share their success stories. The aim is to promote goodpractices in using information for development in all parts of the world. The stories collected inopen platform provide practical examples that we believe will inspire others and raise thevisibility of the critically important role that information plays in development and are availableon: http://www.unesco-ci.org/cgi-bin/ifapstories/page.cgi?g=;d=1. The IFAP website is available on:http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/intergovernmental-programmes/information-for-all-programme-ifap/homepage/It has been thought that the content of the website is fruitful for both the trainers and traineesof information literacy. Information professionals can also be educated so as to give educationabout information literacy.5 http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=27056&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 10
  • 13. 1.6.4. Statistical LiteracyInternational Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) provides an online repository of internationalresources and news in Statistical Literacy on the website (available on:http://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~iase/islp/), international activities to promote the resourcesand the individuals and institutions behind them and outreach activities to increase awarenessof statistical literacy.International Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) disseminates resources (articles, references,bibliographies, portals, websites, tutorials, etc.) divided for special users groups. The onlineresources are selected and designed for: 1. Adults learners and educators 2. Articles with Statistics 3. Assessment of Stats Literacy 4. Census for Children 5. Definitions of Stats Literacy 6. General Resources on Stats Literacy 7. Media and Journalist Training 8. Statistical Offices/Training and Projects 9. Teachers/Resources and Training1.6.5. WKLUCZAMY.PLThe initiative is sponsored and patronized by media Zabrze Television (Silesia region) andweekly magazine Nowiny Zabrzanskie. Regional, civic and social action against thephenomenon of the digital divide, especially of the inhabitants of Silesia aged 50+ years. Theweb site is available on: http://www.wkluczamy.pl/The main aim of project is to help adults and other users from Silesia region to developcultural awareness and information literacy through a series of trainings, workshops, proposedsoftware and e-communication tools.It tries to develop the Information Literacy especially Computer Literacy, Digital Literacycounteracting e-exclusion of information society through the specified amount of workshops,trainings, meetings and research on digital inclusion of adults in Silesia region. The users areable to use the free of charge resources such as: operating system, search engine, officepackage, e-mail software and network, Software (Internet connection) (the project also helpsto receive the ECDL European) and Computer Driving License Certificate.The departmental libraries should undertake the responsibility to design training courses forlibrarians. The workshop approved cooperative and communicative actions, one of them is toshare this information the departmental libraries.1.7 Finalized Best Practices/case studies for Adult/ Lifelong Learning SectorThe improvement of the best practises listed above has been appropriated and discussed atthe workshop.Below there are descriptions of the validated cases.1.7.1. ENTITLE – Europe’s New Libraries Together In Transversal LearningEnvironmentI: GENERAL INFORMATION1. Country: European countries: Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Greece,Hungary, Malta, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, United Kingdom2. EU funding programme: Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union and Funded byEuropean Commission (under LLP KA4 Dissemination and Exploitation of Results). 11
  • 14. 3. Focus, initiative-type: Initiatives/projects aimed at development of IL as social objective4. Learning sector: Lifelong Learning; Adults5. Literacy area: Information Literacy with the impact on Computer Literacy, Digital Literacy6. Geographical / social range:7. Type of institution, organization, and stakeholder: non-official bodies, LIS community,NGOs, Professional bodiesII: CHARACTERISTICConsortiumThe Consortium members are: 1. Aarhus Public Libraries, Denmark 2. Acrosslimits, Malta 3. Bulgarian Library and Information Association (BLIA), Bulgaria 4. BVOE (Buchereiverband Osterreichs), Austria 5. Cluj County Library Octavian Goga, Romania 6. Cross Czech a.s., Czech Republic 7. European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations 8. (EBLIDA), Netherlands 9. Helsinki City Library, Finland 10. Libraries and Archives Department, Lisbon, Portugal 11. MDR Partners, United Kingdom 12. Museums, Libraries and Archives Council, United Kingdom 13. National and University Library of Slovenia (NUK), Slovenia 14. Publika MKK, Hungary 15. The European Schoolnet Partnership (EUN) 16. Veria Central Public Library, GreeceBackgroundENTITLE is a multilateral project under LLP KA4 Dissemination and Exploitation of Results,designed to support and extend the progress made to date by Europe’s public libraries insupporting learning for all age groups and sections of society, by disseminating, consolidatingand enhancing the work of key existing networks, projects and initiatives in this area.It will focus on the contribution to be made through informal learning settings in libraries tolifelong learning, combating digital illiteracy and social exclusion, paying special attention togains achieved through the applications of ICT. ENTITLE is supporting learning for all agegroups and sections of society, by disseminating, consolidating and enhancing the work of keyexisting networks, projects and initiatives in lifelong learning area.Core objectivesENTITLE aims to provide library and partner adult professionals, researchers and decisionmakers in Europe with a common, validated means of collecting and presenting data on theimpact of their learning provision on learners, across their major target learning sectors andto establish a basis upon which they can in future establish trends and developments in amanner which is convincing to strategic policy makers, funding bodies in the education, cultureemployment sectors etc. 12
  • 15. In documents prepared during the project implementation and realization. The expert-validated impact assessment framework designed for use at institutional, regional/nationallevel in supporting quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the impact of libraries learningactivities and services on learning participation, outcomes etc. for children/schools, adultlearners in general and learners involved in vocational education are available in thedocuments prepared during the project implementation and realization. The framework isadaptable for the conducting of comparative studies in future at each of the levels described upto and including pan-European level.The website is available on: http://www.entitlelll.eu/engDetailsThe specific case for investment is the area of public libraries that have a number of naturaladvantages including: their strong roots in local communities, a tradition of partnership withschools and provision of learning-oriented services of various kinds for children; and anincreasingly established role as part of Lifelong Learning landscape. There is a strong politicalassumption, both implicit and explicit, that informal/non-formal learning organizations such aslibraries have a vital job to do by supporting individual learners. needs, providing them withchoices and flexibility, helping people to continue and return to learning, enabling adults to geta job or qualification, signposting and inspiring people to take up other courses, helpingchildren to learn and supporting schools in diversifying children’s experiences. ENTITLE aims toprovide library and partner adult professionals, researchers and decision makers in Europewith a common, validated means of collecting and presenting data on the impact of theirlearning provision on learners, across their major target learning sectors and to establish abasis upon which they can in future establish trends and developments in a manner which isconvincing to strategic policy makers, funding bodies in the education, culture employmentsectors etc.The current consortium has access, through its previous and current activities, to some of themost active and important dissemination networks in the fields: of digital services provided bylibraries at local level (CALIMERA), school-based education (European Schoolnet) and AdultEducation (European Adult Education Association).ResultsENTITLE aims to provide library and partner adult professionals, researchers and decisionmakers in Europe with a common, validated means of collecting and presenting data on theimpact of their learning provision on learners, across their major target learning sectors andto establish a basis upon which they can in future establish trends and developments in amanner which is convincing to strategic policy makers, funding bodies in the education, cultureemployment sectors etc. The core document is the expert-validated impact assessmentframework designed for use at institutional, regional/national level in supporting quantitativeand qualitative evaluation of the impact of libraries learning activities and services on learningparticipation, outcomes etc. for children/schools, adult learners in general and learnersinvolved in vocational education. The framework is adaptable for the conducting ofcomparative studies in future at each of the levels described up to and including pan-Europeanlevel.1.7.2 Information and Media Literacy. UnescoI: GENERAL INFORMATION1. Country: international2. EU funding programme: no EU funding 13
  • 16. 3. Focus, initiative-type: Initiatives/projects aimed at development of IL as social objective4. Learning sector: Lifelong Learning, Transversal5. Literacy area: Information Literacy and Media Literacy6. Geographical / social range: international7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: international organization; United NationsEducational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCOII: CHARACTERISTICConsortiumUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO based in Paris(Headquarters). Part of UNESCO Communication and Information Sector and Capacity buildingObservatory portal.The website is available on:http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.phpURL_ID=15886&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.htmlBackgroundUNESCO action to provide people with the skills and abilities for critical reception, assessmentand use of information and media in their professional and personal lives.Core objectivesThe aim is fostering information and media literate societies by encouraging the developmentof national information and media literacy policies, including in education. That means theimpact on actions for different bodies official and non-official, especially connected witheducational and lifelong learning sector.DetailsUNESCO.s mission in this area consists of fostering information and media literate societies byencouraging the development of national information and media literacy policies, including ineducation. A particular focus is on training teachers to sensitize them to the importance ofinformation and media literacy in the education process, enable them to integrate informationand media literacy into their teaching and provide them with appropriate pedagogical methodsand curricula. An essential element of the strategy is the integration of libraries into theprogrammes as they provide an environment with resources and services for free and openlearning and play a key role in people’s life-long learning.Media literacy section of UNESCO is the action to provide critical knowledge and analyticaltools, empowering media consumers to function as autonomous and national citizens, andenabling them to critically make use of the media.Related actions are e-literacy development and IFAP (the Information for All Programme –IFAP). In September 2007, the Bureau of the Intergovernmental council for IFAP decided tofund a global scale-up project on information literacy and agreed on a series of regionalTraining-The-Trainers workshops in information literacy.Experts specializing in teacher training, curriculum development, media education andinformation literacy representing regions across the globe will gather to agree upon aframework for a model teacher-training curriculum on media and information literacy.The curriculum aims to integrate media education and information literacy in the initial trainingof teachers at secondary school levels, and will be designed for application and adaptationworldwide, according to the needs of each country. The framework will assert the desiredcompetencies of teachers in this field and will focus on raising the awareness of youths in usinginformation and media. 14
  • 17. The initiative is dedicated for Lifelong Learning, but could be addressed to students (all levelsof education), educators, trainers and other users for whom media and information literacy isimportant part of holistic understanding of information literacy competences education.The action held to provide people with the skills and abilities for critical reception, assessmentand use of information and media in their professional and personal lives.ResultsThe project contributes to the spread of information and media literacy in lifelong learning. Theresources – documents, publications (concerning education, indicators, new technologies for ILdevelopment, etc.) are available on the website.1.7.3 IFAP – Information For All ProgrammeI: GENERAL INFORMATION1. Country: international; United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OrganizationUNESCO2. EU funding programme:3. Focus, initiative-type: Initiatives/projects aimed at development of IL as social objective4. Learning sector: Lifelong Learning/common; Awareness development, policy andrecommendation initiatives; Education goals and strategies development; Resources and toolsfor learners, teachers, users. Development5. Literacy area: Information Literacy with the impact on Computer Literacy, Digital Literacy6. Geographical / social range: international7. Type of institution, organization, stakeholder: United Nations Educational, Scientific andCultural Organization UNESCO; National governments, parliaments and their official agencies;II: CHARACTERISTICConsortiumUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO based in Paris(Headquarters) The IFAP is guided in its planning and implementation by an IntergovernmentalCouncil comprising 26 UNESCO Member States that are elected by Unesco General Conference.The functioning of the Council is financed by UNESCO.s regular budget.IFAP works closely with other intergovernmental organizations and international NGOs,particularly those with expertise in information management and preservation, for example theInternational Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) and the InternationalCouncil on Archives (ICA).IFAP works closely with other intergovernmental organizations and international NGOs,particularly those with expertise in information management and preservation, for example theInternational Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) and the InternationalCouncil on Archives (ICA).BackgroundThe Information for All Programme is on-going, intergovernmental programme, created in2000. Through IFAP, Governments of the world have pledged to harness the new opportunitiesof the information age to create equitable societies through better access to information. TheInformation for All Programme is closely integrated with UNESCOs regular programme,especially in the area of communication and information. IFAP works closely with otherintergovernmental organizations and international NGOs, particularly those with expertise ininformation management and preservation, for example the International Federation of LibraryAssociations and Institutions (IFLA) and the International Council on Archives (ICA). IFAP 15
  • 18. works through the National Committees, providing a focus at the country level as well as anopportunity to interpret and mobilize the IFAP vision for local communities through e.g.organization of workshops, meetings and publications.Core objectivesThe overall goal of IFAP is to help UNESCO Member States develop and implement nationalinformation policies and knowledge strategies in a world increasingly using information andcommunication technologies (ICT). In order to achieve this goal, the Programme concentratesalso its efforts on Information Literacy that empowers people in all walks of life to seek,evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupationaland educational goal.DetailsIFAP try to: • promote and widen access to information in the public domain through the organization, digitization and preservation of information; • support training, continuing education and lifelong learning in the fields of communication, information and informatics; . • support the production of local content and foster the availability of indigenous knowledge through basic literacy and ICT literacy training; • promote the use of international standards and best practices in communication, information and informatics in UNESCOs fields of competence; • and promote information and knowledge networking at local, national, regional and international levels.Database of existed IFAP projects is available on:http://www.unesco-ci.org/cgi-bin/ifapprojects/page.cgi?d=1The Bureau of the Intergovernmental Council for IFAP was launched in 2005 and fundsproposals in one of the three priority areas that is promoting information literacy, throughcapacity building particularly for information professionals;ResultsUNESCO.s Information for All Programme (IFAP) wishes to encourage communities usinginformation for development to share their success stories. The aim is to promote goodpractices in using information for development in all parts of the world. The stories collected inopen platform provide practical examples that we believe will inspire others and raise thevisibility of the critically important role that information plays in development and are availableon: http://www.unesco-ci.org/cgi-bin/ifapstories/page.cgi?g=;d=1The IFAP website is available on:http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/intergovernmental-programmes/information-for-all-programme-ifap/homepage/ 16
  • 19. 1.7.4 Statistical LiteracyI: GENERAL INFORMATION1. Country: international2. EU funding programme: no EU funding3. Focus, initiative-type: Initiative/project aimed at development of IL as social objective;Awareness development, policy and recommendation initiative; Education goals and strategiesdevelopment; Curricula development; Resources and tools for learners, teachers, usersdevelopment4. Learning sector: Lifelong Learning; Transversal5. Literacy area: Information Literacy with the impact on Computer Literacy, Digital Literacy6. Geographical / social range: international7. Type of institution, organization, and stakeholder:II: CHARACTERISTICConsortiumThe International Statistical Literacy Project of the International Statistical Institute has asmain objective to contribute to statistical literacy across the world, among young and adults, inall walks of life. The International Statistical Literacy Project is under the umbrella of theInternational Association for Statistical Education (IASE), a section of the InternationalStatistical Institute (ISI). It is overseen jointly by the Executive Committee of the IASE andthe International Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) Advisory Committee. The members group isbased on professionals from national, governmental bodies and higher education institutions.BackgroundThe mission of the International Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) is to support, create andparticipate in statistical literacy activities and promotion around the world. To facilitatecommunication among many countries and projects, ISAP support the webpage, which is aforum where those interested in acquiring or providing statistical literacy can meet (in a virtualsense), exchange needs, information and resources, and learn to disseminate statisticalliteracy in their communities. It replaces the World Numeracy Project of the InternationalStatistical Institute (ISI). To make the mission of the ISLP possible, the webpage wasconverted to the Wiki Environment accessible for every member of the IASE to be activeparticipants in the forum. Activities and editing can be done by anyone after login.Core objectivesThe project aim is to contribute to statistical literacy education, promotion and activities.DetailsInternational Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) provides an online repository of internationalresources and news in Statistical Literacy on the website (available on:http://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~iase/islp/), international activities to promote the resourcesand the individuals and institutions behind them and outreach activities to increase awarenessof statistical literacy.The International Statistical Literacy Project is under the umbrella of the InternationalAssociation for Statistical Education (IASE), a section of the International Statistical Institute(ISI). It is overseen jointly by the Executive Committee of the IASE and the InternationalStatistical Literacy Project (ISLP) Advisory Committee. 17
  • 20. The ISLP is comprised of several projects, each of them focused on one area of statisticalliteracy. Each project is coordinated by expert volunteers (the project coordinator) whohighlight news, compile resources, maintain a web page for their project and execute activitiesdedicated to increase statistical literacy in their area of expertise. The resources compiled byeach project coordinator are useful for acquiring and developing statistical literacy at all levelsfrom Primary/Elementary School through Adult Learners. There are also resources available forofficial statisticians and for journalists and the mass media. Further, there are also resourcesdevoted statistical literacy projects, websites, etc. that have been developed by nationalstatistical offices, national statistical societies, and other non-profit organizations.ResultsInternational Statistical Literacy Project (ISLP) disseminates resources (articles, references,bibliographies, portals, websites, tutorials, etc.) divided for special users groups. The onlineresources are selected and designed for: 1. Adults learners and educators 2. Articles with Statistics 3. Assessment of Stats Literacy 4. Census for Children 5. Definitions of Stats Literacy 6. General Resources on Stats Literacy 7. Media and Journalist Training 8. Statistical Offices/Training and Projects 9. Teachers/Resources and Training1.7.5 WKLUCZAMY.PLI: GENERAL INFORMATION1. Country: Poland2. EU funding programme: no EU funding; project is the social and individual initiative3. Focus, initiative-type: Initiatives/projects aimed at development of IL as social objective4. Learning sector: Lifelong Learning; Adult5. Literacy area: Information Literacy with the impact on Computer Literacy, DigitalLiteracy and Internet literacy6. Geographical / social range: national, regional (Silesia region)7. Type of institution, organization, and stakeholder: non-profit organization – "Silesian Galleryof Ideas”II: CHARACTERISTICConsortiumThe initiative is sponsored and patronized by media Zabrze Television (Silesia region)and weekly magazine Nowiny Zabrzanskie.Regional, civic and social action against the phenomenon of the digital divide, especially of theinhabitants of Silesia aged 50+ years.The web site is available on: http://www.wkluczamy.pl/ 18
  • 21. BackgroundThe project is based on activity of non-profit organization – "Silesian Gallery of deas", in thebattle with a huge social problem, which in Silesia is a "digital divide" of people 50+. CorporateSocial Responsibility (CSR) Initiative WKLUCZAMY.PL is based on extensive sociologicalstudies, which are implemented in the Silesia region by Dr. Romana Pawlinska-Chmara, afaculty member of the Opole University. She founded the organization "Silesian Gallery ofIdeas” that aims at fighting against various social exclusions, especially those of 50+ citizensin the region of Silesia.Core objectivesThe main aim of project is to help adults and other users from Silesia region to developcultural awareness and information literacy through a series of trainings, workshops, proposedsoftware and e-communication tools.DetailsIn the framework of the activity WYKLUCZAMY.PL the society of the initiative is assembled inClub Active 50+. The aim of the Club Active 50 + is to develop the intellectual ability, physicaland cultural, and building interpersonal relationships and the integration of the people from thearea surrounding Zabrze. Proposed various forms of activities allow the participants to lead anactive lifestyle, develop interests and skills, especially those related to support for new formsof communication.The project aim is develop the Information Literacy especially Computer Literacy, DigitalLiteracy counteracting e-exclusion of information society through the pecified amount ofworkshops, trainings, meetings and research on digital inclusion of adults in Silesia region. Theusers are able to use the free of charge resources such as: • operating system, search engine, office package, e-mail software and network • Software (Internet connection). The project also helps to receive the ECDL European • Computer Driving License Certificate.ResultsThe main results are improvement of computer, ICT skills within 50+ group of users. Theimpact was put on e-inclusion of adults. The project incited the awareness of social, cultural,interpersonal and collaborative capacities to create information society with e-communicationpossibilities, tools and forms usage for all citizens. 19
  • 22. ConclusionsNo coherent Information Literacy policy actions are undertaken by the interested organizations– often a lack of funding from the EU is observed within the selected “cases”. The governmentagencies do not fund most of the initiatives or research.Information Literacy has been implemented mainly by academic centers; all kinds of tutorialsand training are created. In some academic and library institutions, thanks to the participationand realization of IL projects, the issues related to IL education have been included into thecurricula.In the case of completed projects there is a lack of data concerning further development of theselected IL initiatives or the projects. impact on educational policy and other actions taken withrespect to teaching information skills. Furthermore, one gets the impression that most of theIL projects did not bring lasting results due to the lack of a wider reflection and overall projectmanagement policy. It is therefore necessary to develop strategic solutions that will ensure theviability of the project results after the termination of funding. Also, as it has been mentionedearlier, all organizations participating in the Information Literacy projects should do muchmore to provide access to complete and good-quality information about their initiatives,particularly through the creation of functional websites and maintaining them not only for theduration of the projects but also afterwards.Within the implementation and realization aspects the lack of uniformity is seen, but on theother hand, there should be some differences because of the diversity of users.The impact should be put more on building strategies for the sustainable implementation of theIL policy, the inclusion of government, academic and other bodies. activity. The emphasisought to be put on: • Development of translational validated taxonomy of Information Literacy strategies • Results of translational mapping of distribution of Information Literacy strategies • Guidelines for teachers and trainers to facilitate optimal use of user and studentInformation Literacy strategies http://empat-ic.eu/eng/Project funded by the European Commission under the Lifelong Learning Programme 20
  • 23. SECTION   2:   DESCRIPTION   OF   THE   “REAL-­‐LIFE”   IL   ACTIVITIES   IN   EACH  COUNTRY  FOR  EACH  SECTOR    2.1 Brief outline of points discussed2.1.1 The Lack of Budget and Human Resources for IL courses in LLL /Adult EducationDealing with this important problem the participants proposed the use of existing material andthe adjustment to the different nationalities/ groups/ languages/ cases. There is no need toimplement our standard but to adjust the international one to the national realities. Let’s useeach others’ expertise. UNESCO’s IL material is in the website, use for free. There is always alot of enthusiast people that are ready to adopt and modify them. The problem is thecooperation. This practice minimizes the budget and the creation time.2.1.2 The Problem about including Information Literacy into the curriculum of allEducational levels.The efforts must start from the lowest level: the user. To reach them it is necessary tocollaborate with students in small groups, to educate librarians, to cooperate with people whoare involved in the informal education system, especially the trainers of the trainers of adulteducation. Such initiatives are welcoming, according to the suggestion of participants.2.1.3 Public libraries, lifelong learning and Information literacy or the necessity ofPublic libraries to play their innovative role.Public libraries are among the most important places for the members of a given community toconnect with information so that they may read, interpret, and produce information that will beappropriate and valuable to the community.As information literacy is a lifelong skill, public libraries are perfectly positioned to be a‘constant presence throughout people’s lives,’ and able to provide ongoing support toindividuals in developing information literacy skills (Harding, 2008)6By making information literacy a core mission, public libraries can reach out to all who wish tobe lifelong learners rather than just the institutionally educated elite and, in so doing, nurturedemocracies (Hall, 2010)7The motivation is not financing, we have to be again missionaries and not to be motivated bymoney. In this context we’ll develop interesting initiatives and happenings.2.1.4 The necessity of promotion and advertisement of IL in LLL and adult education.Information professionals as a rule face with skepticism concepts like “promotion, marketing,advertisement”. They wrongfully insist that marketing is absolutely connected to economicgrowth in contradiction to library’s mission. However, marketing is a useful tool and that’s whyIFLA and other international organizations work to specify the actions and attitudes. TheInformation Literacy Marketing manual of IFLA is translated into various languages. A team ofUniversity of Piraeus librarians are translating the Greek version.6 Harding, J. (2008). “Information literacy and the public library: We’ve talked the talk, but are wewalking the walk?” Australian Library Journal, 57(3): 274–294.7 Hall, Rachel (2010). “Public Praxis: A Vision for Critical Information Literacy in Public Libraries.” PublicLibrary Quarterly, 29: 2, 162-175. 21
  • 24. SECTION  3:  CONCLUSIONS  The workshop after a long discussion came into the following conclusions, concerning theInformation literacy in Adult education/lifelong learning. 1. Promotion of IL and its specialized fields to society, decision makers, politicians and users should be developed. 2. The Ministry of Education and Lifelong learning and Religious Affairs, the Departments of Library and Information Science at higher educational institutions and the relevant libraries should cooperate with each other. 3. Participants could intervene to the General Secretary of LLL in order to recommend the project organizations and curriculum on information literacy in Adult education. 4. Information literacy should be integrated into the LLL activities that run by various organizations. The panellists will seek for people who are willing to cooperate on a pilot teaching course. 5. The Departments of Library and Information Science at higher educational institutions should prepare educational contents/materials related to information literacy. 6. International cooperation concerning Adult education and information literacy should be developed. 7. National strategies are drawn on the European scheme of IL standards, assessment types and learning outcomes. 22
  • 25. APPENDICES  APPENDIX 1: WORKSHOP DOCUMENTS PRESENTED FOR DISCUSSIONThe  workshop  documents  and  posters  are  available  online  through  the  webpage  in  English    APPENDIX 2: WORKSHOP LIST OF PARTICIPANTS International Workshop “Information literacy (IL), the core of the lifelong learning (LLL)”List of participants with affiliations:Name Affiliation e-mail   Axelsson Marie-Louise Linkoping University marie.louise.axelsson@liu.se   Library, Sweden Balta Kyriaki University of balta@uom.gr   Macedonia Hatzilia Margarita Atei of Thessalonika hatzilia@admin.teithe.gr   Monika Jagiellonian University monika.krakowska@uj.edu.pl   Krakowska Institute of Information and Library Science Suchojad Dr. Henryk Jan Kochanowski henryk.suchojad@ujk.edu.pl   University in Kielce The Main Library, Poland Aharony Noa Bar-Ilan University aharonn1@mail.biu.ac.il   Basili Carla CNR, Italy c.basili@ceris.cnr.it   Brage Christina Linkoping University christina.brage@liu.se   Library, Sweden Cavaller Victor Open University of vcavaller@gmail.com   Catalonia Cuturic Daniel Tallin University, amenotis_ehnaton@hotmail.com   Estonia Della Seta Maurella Istituto Superiore di maurelladellaseta@iss.it   Sanità, Rome, Italy Duncan Vicky University of Vicky.Duncan@usask.ca   Saskatchewan, Canada Houlihan Meggan The American mhoulihan@aucegypt.edu   University of Cairo, Egypt Koryanska Agniesrka Jagiellonian University koragnes11@wp.pl   Institute of Information and Library Science Kurbanoglu Serap Hacettepe University serap@hacettepe.edu.tr   Department of 23
  • 26. Information Management Lakshmana Nithin Tallin University, nithinlaxman@gmail.com   Estonia Nagasawa Tayo Mie University, Japan ici43543@nifty.com   Peony Tai University of Hong peony_tai@hku.hk   Kong Libraries Pietruch- Diana Jagiellonian diana.pietruch.reires@uj.edu.pl   Reires University, Cracov Samanian Dr. M. Islamic Azad   University Bojnourd Branch Singh D.K. Banaras dksingh5@yahoo.com   Hindu University, India Tkacz Aneta Main Library of the Jan anetatkacz@ujk.edu.pl   Kachanowski University in Kielce Vahdat Mehrnoosh Tallin University, mehrvah@gmail.com   Estonia Zupan Vesna The "Svetozar buzupan@rcub.bg.ac.rs   Markovic" University Library, BelgradeAPPENDIX 3: WORKSHOP COPIES OF PRESENTATIONSThe  workshop  presentations  are  available  online  through  the  webpage  in  English    APPENDIX 4: COPIES OF PHOTOS, PRESS RELEASES AND MEDIA COVERAGEFROM WORKSHOPSThe workshop p h o t o s are available online through the webpage in English 24
  • 27. http://empat-ic.eu/eng/Project funded by the European Commission under the Lifelong Learning Programme 25

×