Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemi
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemi

on

  • 2,017 views

Workshop: The Importance of Information Literacy in the Vocational Sector ...

Workshop: The Importance of Information Literacy in the Vocational Sector

Venue: Turkish National Library, Yunus Emre Hall, Ankara Turkey

30 May 2011

Prof. Dr. Serap Kurbanoğlu
Hacettepe Üniversitesi
Bilgi ve Belge Yönetimi Bölümü

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,017
Views on SlideShare
2,015
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
38
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.empat-ic.eu 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • This paper / presentation is an attempt to provide an overview of the current issues and challenges of providing IL instruction
  • The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century is an international bestselling book by Thomas L. Friedman , analyzing the progress of globalization with an emphasis on the early 21st century
  • The concept of information literacy has long been discussed in the literature of librarianship and information science (Preston, 2001) How the concept is defined, understood and applied differs from one nation, one culture or one linguistic group to another There are numerous definitions and there is resultant ambiguity Clarification of the definition is essential Its definition is still evolving It is a slippery term means lots of things to lots of people While the term and definition have been debated extensively, the true challenge has not been what or whether, but rather how to create an information literate society Information iteracy is a survival skill in the information age (ALA, 1989) (ben bunu Rocjman, s. 5’ten aldım.
  • Bilgi okuryazarlığı işte verimlilik ve etkinlik sağlamanın ötesinde, demokrasinin varlığını koruması için gereklidir; insanlar eşit yaratılmıştır, ancak, bilgi kaynaklarına erişebilen (bilgi okuryazarı) oy sahipleri diğerlerinden daha akıllıca kararlar vermek konumundadır The concept of information literacy has long been discussed in the literature of librarianship and information science (Preston, 2001) How the concept is defined, understood and applied differs from one nation, one culture or one linguistic group to another There are numerous definitions and there is resultant ambiguity Clarification of the definition is essential Its definition is still evolving It is a slippery term means lots of things to lots of people While the term and definition have been debated extensively, the true challenge has not been what or whether, but rather how to create an information literate society Information iteracy is a survival skill in the information age (ALA, 1989) (ben bunu Rocjman, s. 5’ten aldım.
  • Bilgi becerileri Bilgi ihtiyacını tanımlama, bilgiyi arama, bulma, değerlendirme, kullanma, iletme Üst-düzey düşünme becerileri Analiz ve sentez, problem çözme, karar verme, eleştirel düşünme Teknik beceriler Kendi kendine öğrenme becerisi İletişim becerisi Grup çalışması becerisi Toplumsal ve sosyal sorumluluklar Demokrasi (farkındalık, fırsat eşitliği) Etik (bilimsel ahlak, adil kullanım, fikri mülkiyet haklarına saygı) Gelecekte bilgi bugün henüz bilmediğimiz ve hayal bile edemeyeceğimiz yeni ortamlarda da sunulabilir. Burada önemli olan bilgi sözcüğünün basılı ortamla sınırlı kalmadığı ve bu terim kullanıldığında olası ve mevcut tüm sunum formatlarının kastedildiğini hatırda tutmaktır.
  • The importance of IL has long been recognized The amount of new information stored electronically doubled between 1999 and 2002. This is equivalent each year to 37,000 new libraries with collections the size of the Library of Congress or, put another way, 30 feet of books for every person in the world (Lyman and Varian 2003). can play a key role in promoting an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism enables individulas to become more self-directed (to assume greater control over their own learning and life) Information literacy is thus required because of the ongoing proliferation of information resources and the variable methods of access. Individuals are faced with diverse information choices in their studies, in the workplace, and in their lives. Information is available through community resources, special interest organisations, manufacturers and service providers, media, libraries, and the internet. Increasingly, information comes unfiltered. This raises questions about authenticity, validity, and reliability. Information is available through multiple media, including graphical, aural, and textual. These pose special challenges in evaluating, understanding and using information in an ethical and legal manner. The uncertain quality and expanding quantity of information also pose large challenges for society. Sheer abundance of information and technology will not in itself create more informed citizens without a complementary understanding and capacity to use information effectively (Australian, 2004) The issue is no longer one of not having enough information; it is just the opposite – too much information, in various formats and not all of equal value. Ina time of more than 17 million Internet sites, three billion Web pages, and more than a million items in a typical medium-sized academic library, the ability to act confidently (and not be paralyzed by informatio overload) is critical to academic success and personal self-directed learning (Rockman, 2004, 1) (Alexandria Proclamation, 2005; HILT, 2007; ACRL standards text; The Australian Library and Information Association, 2001; Lau, 2004)
  • Complexity (ambiguity Ongoing proliferation of information Mashups are websites or web applications which use content from more than one source to create a completely new service. This causes problems in the identification of the authorship and/or the real source of info. (serap)
  • Mastering basic skills, achieving literacy and numeracy, and developing patterns of critical thinking are crucial to survival in a world where change is the basic driving force of our daily lives Information is, in fact, our most precious resource. The challenge of educators is to help students make sense of a world described by soma as “information overload) (Rockman, 2004, 2) The issue is no longer one of not having enough information; it is just the opposite – too much information, in various formats and not all of equal value. Ina time of more than 17 million Internet sites, three billion Web pages, and more than a million items in a typical medium-sized academic library, the ability to act confidently (and not be paralyzed by informatio overload) is critical to academic success and personal self-directed learning (Rockman, 2004, 1)
  • The expanding quantity of information pose special challenges in accessing, evaluating, understanding and using information ??? The sheer abundance of information can not in itself create more informed citizens without a complementary understanding and capacity to use information effectively Information literacy is thus required because of the ongoing proliferation of information resources and the variable methods of access. Individuals are faced with diverse information choices in their studies, in the workplace, and in their lives. Information is available through community resources, special interest organisations, manufacturers and service providers, media, libraries, and the internet. Increasingly, information comes unfiltered. This raises questions about authenticity, validity, and reliability. Information is available through multiple media, including graphical, aural, and textual. These pose special challenges in evaluating, understanding and using information in an ethical and legal manner. The uncertain quality and expanding quantity of information also pose large challenges for society. sheer abundance of information and technology will not in itself create more informed citizens without a complementary understanding and capacity to use information effectively (Australian, 2004) Whatever else you bring to the 21st century workplace, however great your technical skills and however attractive your attitude and however deep your commitment to excellence, the bottom line is that to be successful, you need to acquire a high level information literacy (Rockman, s. 8) Effective use of information pose challenges because of the ongoing proliferation of information resources That is why the importance of information literacy is increasing
  • The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century is an international bestselling book by Thomas L. Friedman , analyzing the progress of globalization with an emphasis on the early 21st century
  • In a time of more than 17 million Internet sites, three billion Web pages, and more than a million items in a typical medium-sized academic library, the ability to act confidently (and not be paralyzed by information overload) is critical for success ?? We are awash with information. We are surrounded, prodded, consumed and overwhelmed by it... The total of all printed information doubles every five years. More information has been generated in the last three decades than in all the previous 5000 put together. We are in the midst of an information explosion. And, as is the nature with explosions, the casualties are mounting up. Psychologists are increasingly talking about a strange new ailment - Information fatigue syndrome. Print, film, magnetic, and optical strorage media produced about 5 exabytes of information in 2002 (92% of new information is stored on magnetic media, primarily hard disks) (Lyman and Varian 2003 , 1-2 ). The amount of information printed on paper is still increasing, but the vast majority of new info. İs stored on magnetic media)
  • Infoglut Part of this century's information challenge is already well understood by that minority of the world's population which is educated and privileged, as are we at this SCECSAL conference. We are all well aware of the growth in data, and analog and digital information facilitated by information technology, although the perception that there is a vast growth in data and information every year is now starting to be described as an 'information hallucination'. Yet the 'infoglut', 'datasmog', or even information fatigue experienced by the global minority is another reason for librarians to lead society, governments, and the other professions - in particular the teaching and academic professions - by evidence based advocacy that it is information literacy - not the tool of information technology - which is the key issue of the so-called information age.
  • CERN deki bir deneyin saniyede 40 terabytlık veri üreteceği tahmin ediliyor. (Yaşar’ın sunumu) Avrupa Nükleer Araştırma Merkezi, Cenevre (parçacık fiziği araştırmaları) How Much Information? 2003 Lyman & Varian How much new information per person? According to the Population Reference Bureau, the world population is 6.3 billion, thus almost 800 MB of recorded information is produced per person each year. It would take about 30 feet of books to store the equivalent of 800 MB of information on paper (Lyman and Varian 2003 , 2 ). World Wide Web contains about 170 terabytes of information on its surface; in volume this is seventeen times the size of the Library of Congress print collection (Lyman and Varian 2003 , 2 ). And some 92,000 terabytes of information on deep web (the database driven websites that create web pages on demand) (2 terabytes: An academic library’s collection, 10 terabytes: Print collection of LC Instant messaging generates five billion messages a day (750GB), or 274 Terabytes a year About 31 billion emails are sent daily, on the Internet and elsewhere. Email generates about 400,000 terabytes of new information each year worldwide There are about 2.9 million active weblogs (blogs) containing about 81 GB of information In March 2003, 2,078,051 book titles were available and for sale in some form. In all there were 4,123,094 book titles, including the “out of print” books according to the Books in Print records
  • " Information overload " is a term popularized by Alvin Toffler[ citation needed ] that refers to the difficulty a person can have understanding an issue and making decisions that can be caused by the presence of too much information. [ 1 ] The term itself is mentioned in a 1964 book by Bertram Gross , The Managing of Organizations. [ 2 ] Infoglut Information glut . Masses of continuously increasing information, so poorly catalogued or organized (or not organized at all) that it is almost impossible to navigate through them to search or draw any conclusion or meaning. See also information anxiety and information overload .
  • Psychologist Dr David Lewis, who was involved in preparing the report, suggested that a new phenomenon, information fatigue syndrome , had emerged as a direct result of the information revolution. Symptoms might include the paralysis of the analytical capacity, constant searches for more information, increased anxiety and sleeplessness, as well as increasing self-doubt in decision-making. —Nick Hudson, "Managers 'Suffering from Info Overload'," Press Association Newsfile , October 14, 1996 This disorder was first recognized in the 1990′s by a Dr. David Lewis who coined the term information fatigue syndrome. Anyone out there suffering from information overload? Bogged down with the technology that is supposed to be helping you? And just like burnout, symptoms of information fatigue syndrome include the following: increased anxiety increased stress sleeplessness increased self-doubt in decision making (Do I have the right information? Do I have enough information? Have I backed up my information?) Not only are many of us expected to keep up with the latest technology but we are overloaded with information from multiple sources…such as: email voice mail meetings faxes (does anyone use these anymore?) internet face book blackberries websites blogs have I missed any? How many of you go on vacation and take your blackberry or laptop with you?
  • Already libraries are creating RSS feeds for users to subscribe to, including updates on new items in a collection, new services, and new content in subscription databases. They are also republishing content on their sites (Maness, 2006, s. 6). It is conceivable that this syndication will replace browsing and searching through library websites for content. They (RSS feeds) will enable users to have a single, customized, personal library page that syndicates all the library content of interest to them and their research, eliminating irrelevant information. And users will, of course, control that page and that content (Maness, 2006, s. 6).
  • Nature Dergisinde yayımlanmış bir makale Wikipedia’nın Britannica’dan daha güvenilir olduğunu savunuyor.
  • (Godwin, 2006) These persons want to add web content themselves in uncontrolled ways It is reported that 57% of 12-17 year olds who use Internet could be considered Internet creators by creating a blog, web page, posting artwork, stories, or videos online, or some other kind of online remixing (Godwin, 2006) It is through developments commonly labelled Web 2.0 that the age of the amateur can be most clearly detected Tagging essentially enables users to create subject headings for the object at hand (kinds of organizing info., a apart of IL skills). Tagging allows users to add and change not only content (data), but conent describing content (metadata). In Flickr, users tag pictures. In Library Thing they tag books. In Library 2.0, users could tag the library’s collection and thereby participate in the cataloging process. Tagging simply makes lateral searching easier (Maness, 2006, s. 5). The catalog of Library 2.0 would enable users to follow both standardized and user-tagged subjects; whichever makes most sense to them. This tagged catalog is an open catalog, a customized, user-centered catalog, it is library science at its best (Maness, 2006, s. 6).
  • Peter Godwin (2006) It is a user-centered Web User-centered About user participation Makes it easier to communicate, collaborate and share information (Secker, 2008) Content created by users The line between the creation and consumption of content is blurred Web 2.0 is also called social software Web 2.0 technologies/tools are collaborative in nature, interactive and dynamic The social aspect of networks enabled through Web 2.0 are readily embraced by the Internet generation (Godwin, 2006, 273) New technologies associated with Web 2.0 allow everyone to participate in exploring, creating, spreading and commenting on information The trend toward user-driven content will grow with the use of blogging and other Web 2.0 tools (social networking, blogs, wikis, tagging, and folksonomies) Web 2.0 has been described as “an attitude not a technology” (Davis, 2005) Web 2.0 is a term often applied to a perceived ongoing transition of the World Wide Web from a collection of websites toa full-fledged computing platform seving web applications to end users (Wikipedia) Web 2.0 is fundamentally about user participation, remixing and tagging, featuring user generated content using simpler web tools which are easier for the end-user to learn For example, social networking sites like MySpace let individuals create their own profile and interests, express their views and connect with others via the Web Blogs are web pages used to post information like a journal or an instant message on the web Content is variable, unlimited and is formed by the blogger. It can be like a diary or a notebook Anyone is free to respond but they cannot alter the original content. This is the fundamental difference from the wiki The “blogosphere” has become like a global brain, a kind of collective intelligence and a vital part of online culture The immediacy and comprehensiveness of this blogosphere is becoming so great that it cannot be ignored as an information source Blogs are primary material which can be scholarly, but facilitate instant sharing of ideas and lively debate. The speed of the transaction differs fundamentally from journal publishing and peer review processes Web 2.0 tools and services are changing the way people use the Internet, making it easier to collaborate, communicate and share information (Secker, 2008, s.3) Web 2.0 encompasses ahuge range of tools but the features many of them share is that they are hosted remotely, they facilitate sharing and communication, they allow users to add content and that they are easy to use (Secker, 2008, s.3) and also free at the point of use. It is about using the Internet as a platfom to run software and services rather than your desktop PC, so most software tools are hosted remotely and can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection (Secker, 2008, s.3) Overall characteristics of social software or WEb 2.0 include: Development of social networks Content created by users rather than created by an organisation Development of user profiles Use of folksonomies or tagging to attach keywords created by users, to items toaid retrieval (Secker, 2008, s.4) It is a user-centered Web (Maness, 2006, s. 1) Web 2.0 technologies/tools: all had certain characteristics in common; they were collaborative in nature, interactive, dynamic, and the line between the creation and consumption of content in these environments was blurred (users created the content in these sites as much as they consumed it) (Maness, 2006, s. 1) New technologies associated with Web 2.0 allow everyone to participate in exploring, creating, spreading and commenting on information The trend toward user-driven content is growing with the use of Web 2.0 tools (social networking, blogs, wikis, tagging, and folksonomies) Users will be reading, creating and publishing more and more content The social aspect of networks enabled through Web 2.0 are readily embraced by the Internet generation (Godwin, 2006, 273) Personal web-pages are evolving into blogs, encyclopedias into Wikipedia, text-based tutorials into streaming media applications, taxonomies into “folksonomies”, and question-answer/email customer support infrastructures into instant messaging services (Maness, 2006, s. 1) Ultimately, blogs and wikis are relatively quick solutions for moving library collections and services into Web 2.0. this beginning of Library 2.0 makes collections and services more interactive and user-centered, enable information consumers to contact information producers and become co-producers themselves. It could be that Library 2.0 blurs the line between librarian and patron, creator and consumer, authority and novice. The potential for this dramatic change is very real and immediate, a fact that places an incredible amount of importance on IL. In a world where no information is inherently authoritative and valid, the critical thinking skills of IL are paramount to all other forms of learning (Maness, 2006, s. 5). It does not require much imagination to begin seeing a library as a social network itself. In fact, much of libraries’ role throughout history has been a communal gathering place, one of shared indentity, communication, and action. Social networking could enable librarians and patrons not only to intract, but to share and change resources dynamically in an electronic medium. Users can create accounts with the library network, see what other users have in common to their information needs, recommend resources to users, based on similar profiles, demographics, previously-accessed sources, and a host of data that users provide. And, of course, these networks would enable users to choose what is public and what is not, a notion that could help circumvent the privacy issues Library 2.0 raises (Maness, 2006, s. 5). Of all the social aspects of Web 2.0, it could be that the social network and its successors most greatly mirror that of the traditional library. Social networks, in some sense, are Library 2.0. the face of the library’s web-presence in the future may look very much like a social network interface (Maness, 2006, s. 5).
  • They may also be incresingly useful for esoteric subjects because of the absence of publishing concerns over cost and size. Global proliferation of blogs and wikis has enormous implications for libraries. Blogs may indeed be an even greater milestone in the history of publishing than web-pages. They enable the rapid production and consumption of Web-based publications (Maness, 2006, s. 4). The most obvious implication of blogs for libraries is that they are another form of publication and need to be treated as such. They lack editorial governance and the security this provides, but many are nonetheless integral productions in a body of knowledge, and the absence of them in a library collection could soon become unthinkable. This will, of course, greatly complicate collection development process or, perhaps the very notions of “reliable” and “authoritative”, so important to collection development, will need to be rethough in the wake of this innovation (Maness, 2006, s. 4). Wikis are essentially open web-pages, where anyone registered with the wiki can publish to it, amend it, and change it. Much as blogs, they are not of the same reliability as traditional resources, as the frequent discussions of Wikipedia (an online encyclopedia where any registered user can write, amend or otherwise edit articles) in the library world well note; but this of course does not eliminate their value, it merely changes librarianship, complicates collection development and IL instruction. The lack of peer review and editorship is a challenge to librarians, not in that users should avoid wikis, but only in that they should understand and be critical in depending on them. Wikis as items in a collection, and the associated instruction of users in the evaluation of them, are almost certainly part of the future of libraries (Maness, 2006, s. 4). In addition, a library wiki as a service can enable social interaction among librarians and patrons, essentially moving the study group room online. As users share information and ask questions, answer questions, and librarians do the same within a wiki, a record of these transactions is archived perheps for perpetuity. And these transcripts are in turn resouces for the library to provide as reference. Furthermore, wikis and blogs will almost certainly evolve into a more multi-media environment as well, where both synchronous and asynchronous audio and video collaborations will take place. Blogs are new forms of group study rooms (Maness, 2006, s. 5). Material can be mounted quickly and easily kept up to date. Problems of malicious editing have occured and this has led to the rules for certain pages being tightened up. Wikipedia’s popularity defies its critics and no doubt our users are giving it their seal of approval Librarians cannot afford to ignore Wikipedia or the use of wikis in general. Clearly they should be recommended for quick general information of hot topics, especially as a starting point (Creech, 2006) and “the associated instruction of users in the evaluation of them, are almost certainly part of the future of libraries” (Manes, 2006) They may also be incresingly useful for esoteric subjects because of the absence of publishing concerns over cost and size. Questions such as who began the wiki and for what purpose, the number of persons who seem to be editing, the amount of editing, the amount of editing in the pages you want to use, and whether the project is still being developed or is dead, are advisable (Valenza, 2006; Creech, 2006) A health warning should be given, with encouragement to check information given against another source. IL librarians have to explain how they are developed, using exercises showing how wikis are created and the types of information contained, and teaching awareness of its weakneses It merely changes IL instruction. The lack of peer review and editorship is a challenge to librarians, not in that users should avoid wikis, but only in that they should understand and be critical in depending on them. Questions such as who began the wiki and for what purpose, the number of persons who seem to be editing, the amount of editing, the amount of editing in the pages you want to use, and whether the project is still being developed or is dead, are advisable (Valenza, 2006; Creech, 2006) Librarians cannot afford to ignore Web 2.0 sources or their usage in general. Clearly they should be recommended for quick general information of hot topics, especially as a starting point (Creech, 2006) and “the associated instruction of users in the evaluation of them, are almost certainly part of the future of libraries” (Manes, 2006) A health warning should be given, with encouragement to check information given against another source. IL librarians have to explain how they are developed, using exercises showing how wikis are created and the types of information contained, and teaching awareness of its weakneses It merely changes IL instruction. The lack of peer review and editorship is a challenge to librarians, not in that users should avoid wikis, but only in that they should understand and be critical in depending on them. Personal web-pages are evolving into blogs, encyclopedias into Wikipedia, text-based tutorials into streaming media applications, taxonomies into “folksonomies”, and question-answer/email customer support infrastructures into instant messaging services (Maness, 2006, s. 1) The first generation of online library instruction was provided via text-based tutorials that are static and do not respond to users’ needs nor allow users to interact with one another. These however, have begun evolving into more interactive, media-rich tutorials, using animation programming and more sophisticated database quizzes. Libraries are already moving into Web 2.0, but the move has only just begun (Maness, 2006, s. 2) Library instruction delivered online has begun incorporating more interactive, media-rich facets. The static, text-based explanations coupled with a handout to be downloaded is being supplanted by more experiential tutorials (Maness, 2006, s. 4) Library 2.0 is a user-centered virtual community. It is socially rich electronic space (Maness, 2006, s. 2) Librarian 2.0 might act as a facilitator and provide support, he or she is not necessarily primarily responsible for creation of the content. Users interact with and create resources with one another and with librarians (Maness, 2006, s. 2) IL instructor 2.0 will know when users are lost, and will offer immediate, real-time assistance. For instance, as a user browses through certain resources, repeating steps and moving cyclically through a classification scheme or series of resources, a synchronous messaging service could be prompted to offer asistance (Maness, 2006, s. 3) IL instruction 2.0: Users training other users and contributing the creation and content of IL instruction programs and material Users sometimes one step forward then the librarians and they can take the initiave to make IL instruction to respond quickly the changing info. Resouces and Web 2.0 technologies and tools Web 2.0 technologies have played a significant role in our ability to keep up with the changing needs of library users (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) In the current library world –particularly in public institutions- we are accusttomed to focusing our services on those customers we already reach (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) Library 2.0 will be a meeting place, online or in the physical world, where library users’ needs will be fulfilled through entartainment, information, and the ability to create their own stuff to contribute to the ocean of content out there (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006, Stephens’dan aktarmış) No matter how hard we try, many of the services we offer are not being used by majority of our population (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) The Library 2.0 model gives library users a participatory role in the services libraries offer and the way they are used. Customers, should they desire, will be able to tailor library services to best meet their own needs (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) The Library 2.0 model seeks to harness our customer’s knowledge to supplement and improve library services. User comments, tags, and ratings feed user-created content back into these web sites. Ultimately, this creates a more informative product for subsequent users. Your library customers have favorite titles, authors, and genres. Allowing them to comment, write reviews, create their own tags and ratings, and share them with others through a more versatile OPAC interface will enhance your catalog. Customers want to know what their neighbors are reading, listening to, and watching. (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) Libraries have to evalve continuously to keep up with the changing needs of their users (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) Any service that successfully reaches users, is evaluated frequently, and makes use of customer input is a Library 2.0 service (Casey & Savastinuk, 2006) Many of these tutorials use Flash programming, screen-cast software, or streaming audio or video, and couple the media presentation with interactive quizzing; users respond to questions and the system responds in kind (Maness, 2006, s. 4) These tutorials are perhaps the first of library services to migrate into more the more socially rich Web 2.0. Most, if not all, however, do not generally provide a means by which users can interact with one another, nor directly with librarians. This fact marks a possible potential for the continued development of these tutorials. These could take the form of multi-media chat rooms or wikis, and users will interct with one another and the learning object at hand, much as they would in a classroom or instruction lab (Maness, 2006, s. 4) The time will almost certainly soon come when web-based instruction is nearly indistinguishable from face-to-face instruction; librarians and patrons will see and hear each other, and will share screens and files. In addition, the transcripts these sessions already provide will serve library science in ways that face-to-face instruction never did (Maness, 2006, s. 3) All together, the use of these Web 2.0 technologies and applications, along with others not here mentioned and others not yet invented, will constitute a meaningful and substantive change in the history of libraries. The library’s collection will change, becoming more interactive and fully accessible. The library’s services will change, focusing more on the facilitation of information transfer and IL rather than providing controlled access to it (Maness, 2006, s. 6). Library 2.0 will revolutionize the profession. Rather than creating systems and services for patrons, librarians will enable users to create them for themselves (Maness, 2006, s. 7). It is finally, also necessary to consider that the Web will continue to change rapidly for some time. Web 2.0 is an early one of many. Libraries must adapt to it, much as they did the Web orginally, and must continually adapt for the foreseeable future. In this “perpetual beta” (O’Reilly, 2005), any stability other than the acceptance of instability is insuffient (Maness, 2006, s. 7).
  • The teenage social site Myspace currently has over 100 million users, with perhaps 230.000 new accounts being added daily Facebook, the academic social networking site has over 40 million users since 2004. Some 200.000 new accounts being added daily Wikipedia has at least 9 million articles, of which 2.5 million are in English, some 2.5 billion page views per annum and 600.000 users Blog space is currently doubling every six mounths and Technorati is tracking over 100 million blogs (Valenza, 2006) In USA 8% of net users, or about 12 million American adults, kept a blog, and 39% of net users, or about 57 million American adults read blogs (Pew Report, 2006). The majority of these are under 30 years old This social network sites allow individuals to create profiles which can include personal interests, hobbies, and pictures. Each piece of information link the user to the others with similar interests, and thereby interest groups can be created. Flickr enables anyone to compile their own library of pictures and then share. LibraryThing even allows users to catalogue their books and share lists with each other Web users are reviewing films, recommending books, publishing journals, sharing files, and exchanging favourites Wikis have grown in number and importance since their beginning in 1995. They are founded on a piece of software allowing users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Critics have been quick to point to lack of editorial control, bias, inaccuracy and lack of academic credibility
  • (Rockman, 72) Keeping the prospective users (their characteristics) in mind is essential in the development of instructional programs especially when considering the use of electronic teaching tools such as on-line tutorials They were born during the computer age and grew up in a technological world They are a much more technically sophisticated generation than previous generations They are referred to as Generation Y, Echo Boomers, The Plug-and-Play-Generation, Millenials, The Game Boy Generation, The-Cut-and-Paste Generation (Rockman, 72) They come to higher education ready to accept on-line tutorials that deliver specific content within a self-paced, interactive, individualized instructional environment They appreciate the fact that these tutorials can be programmed to give immediate feedback and are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week 3. Ability to multitask: It is not unusual to view a student speaking on a cell-phone, sending off an instant message, and completing a research paper, all at thesame time. on-line tutorial developers need to explore how best to create the diverse paths from which these students can select Librarians must also critically examine this multitasking phenomenon Can some of these new communication paradigms be integrated into on-line efforts? Are there facets of instant messaging and on-line chats that can provide a more collaborative learning experience within the tutorials? (Rockman, 73) (Because their characteristics have an impact on the (on-line) tutorials) ?? (Without this insight one can run the risk of creating a tutorial with little relevance for its intended audience. Most of the students currently entering universities were born at about the same time as the Macintosh computer They grew up with the graphical user interface, mouse, and local area networks Later, they embraced home on-line information services, chat rooms, cell phones, and school computer labs Today, they also benefit from the wireless devices (ıt is important to keep these points in mind when considering the use of electronic teaching tools such as on-line tutorials. Making the best use of digital technologies requires an accurate understanding of the habits of current students and their preferred learning styles in order to effectively design and develop technological programs that will expand and enhance their learning of IL principles, whether in teaching or research institutions (Rockman, 245) Although these students may have taught themselves how to surf the Internet, download music, or send e-mail, they have not taught themselves to be efficientin their searches, to evalute th sources of the information they are downloading, or to synthesize the information in a meaningful way. These students are computer literate, but numerous studies have shown that they are not information literate.
  • Digital natives / digital imigrants
  • Of course not every student/individual in this age group fits this pattern, (but the analysis is useful as a guide to the challenge faced by librarians) Peter Godwin (2006) VLE- Virtual Learning Environment Google has become this generation’s reference desk (Oblinger and Hawkins, 2006) Google has become the favorite way of searching (and this has led to the use of a new verb “to google” The continuing Google phenomenon This generation believes it knows how to search by typing words into Google They want single search boxes like Amazon and Google which give instant satisfaction They expect library databases to be in their VLEs or wherever they want to work They find library databases too difficult and have no interest in learning about Boolean logic They like collaboration, working in teams and social networking They navigate the web by trial and error and ignore manuals and help sheets Research is self-directed and likely to be non-linear (because they have grown up with PCs and video games) They are happy multitasking They think that what is written down and on the web must be correct They are either confused or ignorant about ethical issues of the content they are using They will cut and paste rather than read and digest what they find The simplicity of its front page has compared favourably with that of databases and most library homepages (Egger-Sider and Devine, 2005) York (2005) concludes that the evidence that users prefer Google to library databases is confirmed by LibQUAL data for 2004 and other studies including the CREE study (Ingram etal, 2004). York proposes that “the resourses users want are indeed online and available through the library; they just can’t discover them”. Indeed there is still a lot of unhappiness with onlie catalogues and off-campus access. Salo (2006) also criticises unfriendly database interfaces
  • Ethical concerns have arisen over (how to cite Second Life)
  • Whatever else you bring to the 21st century workplace, however great your technical skills and however attractive your attitude and however deep your commitment to excellence, the bottom line is that to be successful, you need to acquire a high level information literacy (Rockman, s. 8) However, the need for guidance on how to use keywords, and more crucially, the ethical use and evaluation of material remains IL is much more than knowing how to open a Web browser and type a search term into Google The user still needs to know about reliable information sources, and put the information into context Many librarians have been more pragmatic and recognised that Google, and in particular Google Scholar, has a place in students’ information searching strategy Users will still require assistance through the information maze, particularly with the growth of content deriving from Web 2.0 applications
  • Eğitim kurumlarının Temel sorumlulukları: Toplumların gereksinim duyduğu insan gücünü yetiştirmek Formal eğitime yaşam boyu eğitime hazırlık süreci olarak bakılıyor Eğitim programları yaşam boyu öğrenme için gerekli becerileri kazandırmaya odaklanıyor Yeniden yapılandırılmaları lazım Bu becerilerin (yaşam boyu öğrenme becerilerinin) okulda kazandırılması önemli
  • Kullanıcı eğitimi – 1800 Kullanıcı eğitimi Türkiye - 1970 Bilgi okuryazarlığı – 1974 - ABD - Paul Zurkowski - NCLIS’a ( National Commission on Libraries and Information Science ) sunulan bir öneride kullanılmıştır
  • A Nation at Risk, 1983 (ABD) ALA Presidential Committee on Information Literacy: Final Report, 1989 (ABD) What work requires of schools: a SCANS report for America 2000, 1991 (ABD) Developing Lifelong Learners Through Undergraduate Education, 1994 (Avustralya) Dearing Report on Higher Education in the Learning Society, 1998 (UK) Students’ Bill of Information Rights, 1997 (Kanada) Ülkemizde TÜSİAD (1999) tarafından hazırlanan bir raporda ise ülkelerin kalkınmışlık düzeyini belirlemede kullanılan en önemli ölçütlerden birinin o ülkenin sahip olduğu insan kaynaklarının niteliği olduğu vurgulanmaktadır. Söz konusu raporda çağımız bireylerinde bulunması gereken temel beceriler şu şekilde belirtilmektedir: İletişim kurma, uyum sağlama, doğru bilgiye ulaşma, karar verme, sorumluluk alma, yaratıcılık gösterme, işbirliği yapma, sorun çözme, karmaşık sistemleri algılama ve kendini geliştirme. Günümüz toplumlarının gereksinim duyduğu insan profili, geçmişte gereksinim duyulan insan profilinden farklılık göstermeye başlamıştır. Bunun sonucu olarak günümüzde ihtiyaç duyulan insan profilini tanımlamaya yönelik çeşitli çalışmalar yapılmıştır. ABD’de yapılan bir çalışmada 21. yüzyıl bireylerinin başarılı bir iş performansı göstermeleri için etkin olmaları gereken alanlar şu şekilde belirlenmiştir (SCANS, 1991): Kaynak kullanımı (zaman, para, mekan, materyal ve insan gücü yönetimi). Kişilerarası ilişkiler (grup çalışması, iletişim kurma, bilgiyi paylaşma). Bilgi kullanımı (bilgiye ulaşma, bilgiyi değerlendirme, düzenleme, yorumlama ve iletme). Teknoloji kullanımı (her tür teknolojiden yararlanabilme, uygun teknolojinin seçimi, teknolojik problemleri çözme). Sistem analizi (toplumsal, örgütsel ve teknik sistemlerin nasıl çalıştığını anlama, bu sistemleri yönetebilme, sistem tasarımı ve bakımı).
  • Kullanıcı eğitimi – 1800 Kullanıcı eğitimi Türkiye - 1970 Bilgi okuryazarlığı – 1974 - ABD - Paul Zurkowski - NCLIS’a ( National Commission on Libraries and Information Science ) sunulan bir öneride kullanılmıştır
  • House of Representatives Committee for Long-term Strategies on Australia, 1991 (Avustralya) Education Training, and Research in the Information Society: A National Strategy, 1994 (Finlandiya) GOALS 2000: Educate America Act , 2000 (ABD) Ministry for Education and Research. Position paper, 2002 (Almanya)
  • NFIL - National Forum on Information Literacy (ABD) ALIA - Australian Information Literacy Forum FORMIST (Fransa) NordINFOlit – Nordic Forum for Information Literacy (İskandinavya) ENIL - European Network for Information Literacy ENSIL - European Network for School Libraries and Information Literacy European Forum for Information Literacy (EFIL) IAIL - International Alliance for Information Literacy
  • Avustralya, 1992-2001 İskandinavya – Creating Knowledge, 1999- İngiltere - LILAC (Librarian’s IL Annual Conference), 2005- İskoçya – eLit, 2002- Güney Amerika,1998- İspanya, 1997 Almanya ABD - ACRL
  • Kıbrıslılar dahil Türklerin sayısı yaklaşık 15 IFLA (Information Literacy Section – 2002) World Summit on the Information Society (UN) Cenevre 2003 / Tunus 2005 Prague Conference, 2003 (NFIL, UNESCO & NCLIS) Prague Declaration Alexandria Conference, 2005 (IFLA, UNESCO, NFIL & NCLIS) Alexandria Proclamation World Conference, 2009 (!)
  • Raporlar Educating Students to Think: The Role of the School Library Media Program, 1986 Information Power: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs Information Literacy: A Position Paper on Information Problem-Solving, 1994 Standartlar AASL & AECT, 1998 ANZIIL, 2004 IFLA, 2006 Eğitim programları
  • Raporlar Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities, 1995 (ABD) Learning for Life, 1998 (Avustralya) Standartlar ACRL, 2000 (ABD) CAUL, 2001 (Avustralya) Students’ Bill of Information Rights, 1995 (Kanada) CONPAB-IES, 2002 (Meksika) IFLA, 2006 Eğitim programları Başarılı uygulamalar için rehberler IIL – 2002 ANZIIL - 2004 Akreditasyon kurumlarının desteği
  • Bilgi okuryazarlığı öğretmenlerin sahip olması gereken temel beceriler arasında kabul edilmeye başlandı Öğretmen eğitimi programları ve performans beklentileri bilgi okuryazarlığını becerilerini içerek şekilde yeniden yapılandırılıyor Akreditasyon kurumlarının desteği
  • Kitaplar ve makaleler 1974-2002 arasında yaklaşık 5000 yayın (makale, bildiri, web sitesi) 1974’te 38 yayın, 2002’de 330 yayın 2002 yılında yayımlanan makale sayısı 287, 2003’de 278 Raporlar Information literacy: an international state-of-the art report (UNESCO, IFLA) International Guidelines on Information Literacy (IFLA) Veritabanları International Information Literacy Resources Directory (UNESCO/IFLA) veritabanı Dergiler Journal of Information Literacy – JIL (CILIP, 2007- ) Journal of eLiteracy – Jelit (2004 - 2005) Communications in Information Literacy – CIL (2007- ) Bibliyografyalar Information Literacy Selective Bibliography http://www.fiu.edu/%7Elibrary/ili/biblio.htm Information Literacy – Sources of Information http://www.his.se/templates/vanligwebbsida1.aspx?id=7868 Information Literacy: An Annotated Bibliography http://lacuny.cuny.edu/institute/2001/bibliography.html Directory of Online Resources for Information Literacy http://bulldogs.tlu.edu/mdibble/doril/ Reference Services Review (annual lists of articles, 1996- ) Information Literacy 1973-2002: A Selected Literature Review (2002). Library Trends, 51(2), 242-259 Web siteleri Information Literacy Website www.informationliteracy.org.uk ACRL Information Literacy Page http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/acrlinfolit/informationliteracy.htm CARL – Information Literacy Portal (Canada) Information Literacy on the WWW http://www.fiu.edu/~library/ili/iliweb.html Weblogs http://dis.shef.ac.uk/literacy/ http://information-literacy.blogspot.com/ http://blogformist.enssib.fr Tartışma Listeleri INFOLIT Information Literacy Discussion List – AASL & ACRL ILI-L Information Literacy Instruction Discussion List – ALA InfoLIT-L Information Literacy Section Discussion List – IFLA aliaINFOLIT – ALIA (Avustralya) Edudoc – (Belçika) Lis-infoliteracy – (UK)
  • ALA Presidential Committe on Information Literacy, 1987 (ABD) SCONUL Working Group on Information Literacy (UK) CILIP Information Literacy Group, 2004 (UK) CAUL Information Literacy Group (Avustralya) Federation of Library Associations of Brazil – Information Literacy Committee (Brezilya) Library Association of Ireland – Working Group on Information Literacy, 2005 (İrlanda) Canadian Library Association – Information Literacy Interest Group (Kanada) ILL - Institute of Information Literacy, 1998 (ACRL – ABD) ANZIIL - Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy, 2004 (Avustralya)
  • This paper / presentation is an attempt to provide an overview of the current issues and challenges of providing IL instruction

Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemi Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Bilgi Okuryazarlığının Önemi
    • Prof. Dr. Serap Kurbanoğlu
    • [email_address]
    • Hacettepe Üniversitesi
    • Bilgi ve Belge Yönetimi Bölümü
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 2.
    • Information literacy is the ability of transforming
    • i nformation into knowledge
    • Gwen Gawit
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 3. Bilgi okuryazarlığı
    • Bilgi okuryazarlığı, bilgi problemlerini çözme becerisidir
    • (ALA, 2000)
    • Bilgi okuryazarlığı, bilgi gereksinimini tanımlama, gereksinim duyulan bilgiyi bulma, değerlendirme, etkin şekilde kullanma ve iletme becerisidir
    • (ALA, 1989)
    • Bilgi okuryazarı birey, problem çözmek ve karar vermek için gereksinim duyulan bilgiyi bulma ve kullanma gibi becerilere sahip olan bireydir
    • (Burchial,1976)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 4. Bilgi okuryazarlığı
    • Bilgi okuryazarlığı işte verimlilik ve etkinlik sağlamanın ötesinde, demokrasinin varlığını koruması için gereklidir
    • (Owens, 1976)
    • Bilgi okuryazarlığı katılımcı yurttaşlık, sosyal kabul görme, yeni bilgi üretimi, kişisel ve kurumsal gelişim ve yaşam boyu öğrenme için ön şarttır
    • (Bundy, 2004)
    • B ilgi okuryazarlığı, bireylerin kişisel, sosyal, mesleki ve eğitime yönelik hedeflerine ulaşmalarını sağlamak için yaşamın her alanında bilgiyi etkin şekilde arama, değerlendirme, kullanma ve yaratma becerisidir
    • ( Alexandria Proclamation , 2005).
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 5. Bilgi okuryazarı bireyin özellikleri
    • doğru ve yeterli bilginin karar vermedeki önemini bilir,
    • bilgi gereksinimini fark eder,
    • bilgi gereksinimine dayalı sorular formüle eder,
    • olası bilgi kaynaklarını belirler,
    • başarılı araştırma stratejileri geliştirir,
    • bilgi kaynaklarına erişir,
    • bilgiyi değerlendirir,
    • bilgiyi düzenler,
    • yeni bilgiyi mevcut bilgisiyle bütünleştirir,
    • (Doyle, 1992)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 6. Bilgi okuryazarı bireyin özellikleri
    • bilgiyi problem çözmek amacıyla kullanır
    • eleştirel düşünme becerisine sahiptir
    • bağımsız ve etkin bir bilgi tüketicisidir
    • bilginin nasıl düzenlendiğini bilir
    • bilgiyi nereden bulacağını ve nasıl kullanacağını bilir
    • bilgi üreticisidir
    • kendi kendine öğrenme becerisine sahiptir
    • kendini yönlendirme becerisine sahiptir
    • değişime kolay ayak uydurur
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 7. Kavramın evrimi
    • Eldeki tanımlar taşıdıkları ortak özelliklerin yanı sıra bazı farklılıklar da göstermektedir
    • Tanımların zaman içindeki gelişimi incelendiğinde elde edilecek en çarpıcı bulgu kapsamın giderek genişlediğidir
    • Bunun başlıca iki nedeni vardır:
      • Kavram kargaşasına engel olmak için daha fazla ayrıntı belirtme ihtiyacı
      • Değişime ayak uydurması zorunlu olan bu kavramın evrilmeye devam etmesidir.
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 8. Kavramın evrimi
    • Eldeki tanımlar bilgi okuryazarlığının
      • eleştirel düşünce ve bilginin etik kullanımı ve demokratik haklar alanlarına doğru genişlediğini
      • sürekli eğitim, yaşam boyu öğrenme, kendi kendine öğrenme kavramlarıyla ilişkilendirildiğini
      • bilginin çeşitli formatlarda olabileceğine dikkat çektiğini
      • teknoloji becerilerini de içerdiğini
      • eğitim, iş yaşamı ve günlük yaşamda başarıyı etkilediğini
      • kişisel, mesleki, sosyal gelişimle ilişkilendirildiğini göstermektedir
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 9. Kavram kargaşası Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara Görsel okuryazarlık Medya okuryazarlığı Bilgisayar okuryazarlığı Ağ okuryazarlığı
  • 10.
    • it is not the strongest of the species that survive,
    • nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change Charles Darwin
    • yaşamlarını sürdürmeyi başaran canlılar
    • ne en güçlüler ne de en zekiler değil,
    • değişikliğe en iyi uyum sağlayabilenlerdir
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 11. 21. yüzyıl Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara teknoloji yaşam tarzı beklentiler gereksinimler iş ortamları iş tanımları meslekler bilgi DEĞİŞİM
  • 12. D eğişim in yansımaları
    • Değişime ayak uydurmak zorunlu
    • Ayak uyduramayanlar rekabet güçlerini yitiriyor
    • Değişimden etkilenmeyen meslek ya da birey yok
    • Diplomaların ömrü kısaldı
    • Günümüz toplumları gereksinimlerini sorgulamaya başladı
    • Gereksinim duyulan iş gücü yeniden tanımlandı
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 13. Çağın bireylerinde bulunması gereken temel beceriler
    • Kaynak kullanımı
    • Kişilerarası ilişkiler
    • Bilgi kullanımı
    • Teknoloji kullanımı
    • Sistem analizi
    • (SCANS, 1991)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 14. Çağın bireylerinde bulunması gereken temel beceriler
    • İletişim kurma
    • Uyum sağlama
    • Doğru bilgiye ulaşma
    • Karar verme
    • Sorumluluk alma
    • Yaratıcılık gösterme
    • İşbirliği yapma
    • Sorun çözme
    • Karmaşık sistemleri algılama
    • Kendini geliştirme
    • (TÜSİAD, 1999)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 15. Öğrencilerde bulunması gereken temel beceriler
    • Bilgiye ulaşma
    • Ulaştığı bilgiyi seçme, örgütleme ve kullanma
    • Problem çözme
    • Teknolojiyi etkili olarak kullanma
    • İletişim kurma ve grup çalışması yapma
    • (ISTE, 1998)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 16. Üniversite mezunlarında bulunması gereken temel beceriler
    • Kuramı ve uygulamayı ilişkilendirebilme
    • Problem çözme
    • Bilgi teknolojilerini kullanabilme
    • Bilgi okuryazarlığı
    • Takım çalışması yapabilme
    • Sözlü ve yazılı iletişim
    • (Orr, Appleton ve Wallin, 2001)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 17. Değişime ayak uydurmak Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara Mevcut bilginin yenilenmesi gereksinimi Mevcut becerilerin geliştirilmesi gereksinimi Yaşam boyu öğrenme gereksinimi
  • 18. Yaşam boyu öğrenme
    • Bireylerin yaşam sürelerince içinde bulunacakları her türlü rol, ortam ve çevre için gereksinim duyacakları tüm bilgi, değer ve becerileri sağlamalarına olanak tanıyan süreçtir
    • Yaşam boyunca devam eden ve bir süreklilik gösteren, formal veya informal her türlü öğrenme eylemidir
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 19. Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara Yaşam boyu öğrenme Bağımsız öğrenme Bilgi okuryazarlığı
  • 20. Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemi
    • Yaşam boyu öğrenmenin temel şartıdır
    • Kişisel, mesleki ve entellektüel gelişime yardımcı olur
    • Gelişmeleri anlama ve kavramaya yardımcı olur
    • Değişime ayak uydurmayı kolaylaştırır
    • Bilgi toplumuna uyumu kolaylaştırır
    • Öngörü kazandırır
    • Rekabet gücünü artırır
    • İş bulmayı kolaylaştırır
    • Sosyal dışlanmayı engeller
    • Bireylerin kendi yaşamları üzerindeki kontrolünü artırır
    • Yeni bilgi üretimi için gereklidir
    • Sosyo-ekonomik gelişime katkı sağlar
    • Nitelikli iş gücü oluşumunu sağlar
    • Daha güçlü toplumlar yaratır
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 21. Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemini artıran gelişmeler
    • Bilgi miktarındaki artış
    • Bilginin niteliğindeki belirsizlik
    • Yeni neslin özellikleri
    • Etik sorunlar
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 22. Bilgi miktarındaki artış
    • Bilgi, insanlığın sahip olduğu en değerli kaynak
    • Sorun artık yeterli bilgiye sahip olamamak değil, tam tersi çok fazla bilgi olması
    • Günümüz bireyleri, okulda, iş yerinde, günlük hayatta çok çeşitli bilgi seçenekleri ile karşı karşıya
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 23. Bilgi miktarındaki artış
    • Seçenek çok fazla
      • Bilgi Sağlayıcılar: Özel ve tüzel kurumlar, servis sağlayıcılar, kütüphaneler, medya, Internet
      • Form: Metin, grafik, görsel, işitsel
      • Erişim yöntemleri
    • Sorun tüm bu seçeneklerle başa çıkabilmekte
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 24.
    • Never before in the history of the planet have so many people –on their own- had the ability to find so much information about so many things and about so many other people
    • J. L. Friedman, 2005
    • Dünya tarihinde daha önce hiçbir zaman
    • bu kadar çok insan kendi başına bu kadar çok şey
    • ve bu kadar çok insan hakkında
    • bu kadar çok bilgi bulma olanağına sahip olmadı
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 25. Bilgi patlaması
    • Günümüzde basılı bilgi miktarı her 5 yılda bir ikiye katlanıyor (Bundy, 1999)
    • Son 30 yılda üretilen bilgi miktarı daha önceki 5000 yılda üretilenden daha fazla (Bundy, 1999)
    • 2002 yılında 5 exabayt yeni bilgi üretilmiş (Lyman and Varian 2003 )
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 26.
    • 1 Kilobayt 1.024 bayt
    • 1 Megabayt 1.048.576 bayt
    • 1 Gigabayt 1.073.741.824 bayt
    • 1 Terabayt 1.099.511.627.776 bayt
    • 1 Petabayt 1,125,899,906,842,624 bayt
    • 1 Exabayt 1,152,921,504,606.846,976 bayt
    • 1 Zettabayt 1,180,591,620,717,411,303,424 bayt
    • 1 Yottabayt 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 bayt
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 27. 5 exabayt’ın büyüklüğü nedir?
    • Kongre Kütüphanesindeki 19 milyon kitap ve basılı materyal koleksiyonu sayılsal ortama aktarılsa 10 terabayt bilgi içerir.
    • 5 exabayt, Kongre Kütüphanesi büyüklüğünde 500.000 kütüphanenin basılı koleksiyonunu içerir
    • (Lyman and Varian 2003)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 28. Ne kadar bilgi?
    • Yeni üretilen bilginin % 92’si manyetik ortamda, çoğunlukla hard disk’lerde depolanıyor
    • Elektronik bilginin 1999 ve 2002 yılları arasında yılda % 30 oranında arttığı hesaplanmış
    • Elektronik bilgi 1999 ile 2002 yılları arasında ikiye katlanmış. Bu da her yıl Kongre Kütüphanesi büyüklüğünde 37,000 yeni kütüphane koleksiyonunu içerecek kadar bilgi demek
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 29. Ne kadar bilgi?
    • World Wide Web yüzeyde 170 terabayt bilgi içeriyor. Kongre Kütüphanesi basılı koleksiyonunun 17 misli (2 terabayt bir üniversite kütüphanesinin içeriği)
    • Derin Web’in (Invisible Web) yüzeysel Web’den 400-450 kez daha büyük olduğu tahmin ediliyor (yaklaşık 91.850 terabayt)
    • Günde yaklaşık 31 milyar elektronik mesaj üretiliyor. Yılda yaklaşık 400,000 terabayt
      • (Lyman ve Varian, 2003)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 30. Aşırı bilgi yüklemesi
    • Fazla miktarda bilgi nedeniyle bireyin bir konuyu anlamakta ve o konuda karar vermekte güçlük çekmesi
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 31. Bilgi yorgunluğu sendromu
    • 1990 yılında psikolog Dr. David Lewis tarafından tanımlanmış
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 32. Bilgi yorgunluğu sendromu
    • Semptomları:
      • analitik düşünme yetisinde kayıp
      • artan düzeyde kaygı
      • artan düzeyde stres
      • uykusuzluk
      • sürekli daha fazla bilgi arama eğilimi
      • karar verememe (kararlarından şüphe duyma)
    • Nedenleri:
      • doğru bilgiye ulaştığından şüphe duyma
      • yeterli bilgiye ulaştığından şüphe duyma
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 33. Bilginin niteliğindeki belirsizlik
    • Filitrelenmeden kullanıcıya ulaşan bilgi miktarı giderek artıyor
    • Bu durum bilginin değeri ve güvenilirliği konusundaki soruları artırıyor
    • Web 2.0 içerik yaratma konusunda kullanıcı katılımını teşvik eden ve bunun için sayısız olanak ve araç sunan bir ortam
    • Web 2.0 isteyen herkese Internet üzerine bilgi koyma, yayma ve yorum yapma olanağı tanıyor
    • Web 2.0 araçları ile birlikte kullanıcılar tarafından üretilen içerik hızla artıyor
      • Blog’lar
      • Wiki’ler
      • Sosyal ağlar (MySpace, Facebook)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 34.
    • Peter, Thomas Edison ile ilgili paragrafın hakkında...
    • Ne olmuş ona?
    • Wikipedia’dan kelime kelime kopya etmişsin. Orijinal çalışmalar yapmanızı bekliyorum.
    • Wikipedia’daki bölümü benim yazmadığımı kim söylüyor?
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 35. Wikiality
    • Truth by consensus
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 36. Amatörler çağı
    • Amatör yazarlar
    • Amatör editörler
    • Amatör eleştirmenler
    • Amatör yorumcular
    • Amatör kullanıcılar
    • Amatör bilgi arayıcılar
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara Şimdi seninle ilgili bir Wikipedia makalesi yaratacağım
  • 37. Web 2.0 Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 38. Yayıncılık tarihinde yeni bir çığır
    • Web 2.0 bilginin hızlı şekilde üretilmesine ve yayınlanmasına ve tüketilmesine olanak sağlıyor
    • Üretim hızları en önemli avantajları
    • Web 2.0 ürünleri yeni yayıncılık ürünleri olarak görülmeli
    • Hakem ve editör değerlendirmesinden geçmemiş olmaları taşıdıkları en önemli dezavantaj
    • Geleneksel yayıncılık ürünlerinin güvenirliğini taşımıyorlar, ancak, bu değersiz oldukları anlamına da gelmiyor
    • Doğaları gereği açık ve demokratik bilgi ortamları, ancak bu güvenilir oldukları anlamına gelmiyor
    • Kullanıcıların bu kaynaklara yönelik eleştirileri anlaması ve kullanırken göz önünde bulundurmaları önemli
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 39. Sayılarla Web 2.0
    • Myspace’in kullanıcı sayısı 100 milyonun üzerinde. Günde 230.000 civarında yeni üyelik söz konusu
    • Facebook’un kullanıcı sayısı 350 milyonun üzerinde. Günde 200.000 artıyor
    • Wikipedia 250 ayrı dilde 9 milyona yakın makale içeriyor. Bunların 2.5 milyonu İngilizce. 75.000 aktif katılımcısı var.
    • Blog sayısı her altı ayda bir ikiye katlanıyor. Technorati 100 milyonun üzerinde blog indeksliyor
    • ABD’de Internet kullanıcılarının
      • %51’i Web’de içerik üretmiş
      • Şirketlerin %70’i personal ihtiyacında LinkedIn’e başvuruyor.
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 40. Evet blog’unu da okuyabiliriz tabii ama bugün okul nasıldı bize anlatabilirsin... Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 41. Yeni bir nesil
      • Internet yokken herkes birbirine nasıl e-posta gönderiyordu?
    • Bilgisayar çağında doğdular ve teknoloji ile iç içe büyüdüler
    • Farklı kavramlar kullanılıyor
      • Internet Generation,
      • Generation Y,
      • Echo Boomers,
      • The Plug-and-Play-Generation,
      • Millenials,
      • The Game Boy Generation,
      • The-Cut-and-Paste Generation (Rockman, 72)
    • Teknoloji kullanımı açısından kendilerinden önceki nesilden çok daha ileri düzeydeler
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 42. Digital yerliler / Digital göçmenler
    • Sen benim Web sitemi yap, ben de senin ödevini yapayım.
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 43. Google nesli
    • Bilgi ararken ilk ve genellikle tek tercihleri Google (Google’da günde yaklaşık bir milyar arama yapılmakta) (Oblinger and Hawkins, 2006)
    • Google gibi tek penceresi olan bir arayüz kullanmayı tercih ediyor ve genellikle bir sözcük veya bir cümle ile arama yapıyorlar
    • Veri tabanlarını karmaşık buluyor, istediği heryerden erişemediği için hoşlanmıyor ve kullanmıyorlar (Godwin, 2006)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara Bence bilgisayar kullanmaya hazır. Google dedi!
  • 44. Internet nesli
    • Herşeyin web’den erişileceğine inanıyorlar
    • Wikipedia’yı temel başvuru kaynağı olarak kullanıyorlar
    • Web’de buldukları herşeyin doğru olduğuna inanıyorlar
    • Danışmıyor, yönlendirmeleri kullanmıyor, deneme yanılma yöntemiyle bilgi arıyorlar
    • Bilginin etik kullanımı konusunda ilgisiz veya bilgisizler
    • Bulduğunu okuyup sindirmek yerine kesip yapıştırıyorlar
    • Web 2.0 araçlarını kullanarak içerik yayınlanıyorlar
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 45. Artan etik sorunlar
    • Elektronik ortamdaki bilginin kopyalanması çok kolay
    • Bilginin kaynağının takip edilmesi zor (yazar kimliği, hiper linkler)
    • Olanaklar farkında olmadan intihale neden olabiliyor
    • Sosyal Web’deki bilginin aidiyetini saptamak güç olabiliyor
    • Bu yeni ortamlara gönderme yapılması gerektiği bilinmiyor (örn.: bloglar)
    • Yeni ortamlara nasıl gönderme yapılacağı bilinmiyor (Second life’a nasıl gönderme yaparım?)
    • Sosyal Web sunduğu bazı olanaklarla istenmeyen bilgi paylaşımına neden olabiliyor (Facebook çalışma grubu)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 46. Bilgi okuryazarlığı becerileri hiç bu kadar önemli olmamıştı
    • Bilgi artışı ile bilgi arama, ilgili bilgiye erişme, bilgiyi seçme konularındaki becerilere her zamankinden daha fazla gereksinim var
    • Niteliği belirsiz bilginin artışı eleştirel düşünce becerilerinin önemini artırıyor
    • Yeni neslin bilgi arama ve bilgi kaynaklarını kullanma konusundaki eğilimleri bilgi okuryazarlığı becerilerinin önemini artırıyor
    • Olanakların ve yeni ortamların etik davranışlar konusunda yarattığı karmaşanın çözülebilmesi için bilgi okuryazarlığı becerilerine ihtiyaç var
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 47. Bilgi okuryazarlığı eğitimi
    • eğitim kurumları
      • yüksek öğretim (meslek yüksek okulları)
      • ilk ve orta öğretim (meslek liseleri)
    • kütüphaneler
      • üniversite kütüphaneleri
      • okul kütüphaneleri
      • kurum kütüphaneleri
      • halk kütüphaneleri
    • işyerleri (hizmet içi eğitim, sürekli eğitim)
    • meslek örgütleri (dernekler)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 48. Türkiye’de bilgi okuryazarlığı çalışmaları
  • 49. Terimin ilk kullanımı
    • 1998
    • Türk Kütüphaneciler Derneği tarafından düzenlenen bir toplantıda kullanılmıştır
    • Toplantıda bu konuda bir bildiri sunulmuştur (Oya Gürdal)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 50. Ulusal raporlar
    • Türkiye’de Mesleki ve Teknik Eğitimin Yeniden Yapılandırılması, 1999 (TÜSİAD)
      • Ülkelerin kalkınmışlık düzeyini belirlemede kullanılan en önemli ölçütlerden biri o ülkenin sahip olduğu insan kaynaklarının niteliğidir
      • Çağımız bireylerinde bulunması gereken temel beceriler şunlardır: İletişim kurma, uyum sağlama, doğru bilgiye ulaşma, karar verme, sorumluluk alma, yaratıcılık gösterme, işbirliği yapma, sorun çözme, karmaşık sistemleri algılama ve kendini geliştirme
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 51. Ulusal raporlar
    • Bilişim Teknolojileri ve Politikaları Özel İhtisas Komisyonu Raporu , 2001
      • Ülkemizde bilgi okuryazarlığı düzeyi düşüktür
      • Her tür ve her düzeyden eğitim kurumunda bilgi okuryazarlığı eğitimi desteklenmelidir
      • Okul ve halk kütüphaneleri bilgi okuryazarlığı ve yaşam boyu öğrenmeyi desteklemek için geliştirilmelidir
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 52. Ulusal planlar ve politikalar
    • Sekizinci Beş Yıllık Kalkınma Planı (2001-2005)
      • Yaşam boyu eğitim
      • Problem çözme becerileri
    • Dokuzuncu Beş Yıllık Kalkınma Planı (2006-2010)
      • Yaşam boyu eğitim
      • Problem çözme becerileri
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 53. İşbirliği ve koordinasyon
    • İLİPG – Yaratıcı Kütüphane Girişimleri Tanıtım Grubu – Bilgi Okuryazarlığı Projesi
      • 2007
      • 15 okul (6 ilk öğretim, 9 lise)
      • İl Milli Eğitim Müdürlüğü, İLİPG (yabancı kültür merkezleri, üniversiteler, Türk Kütüphaneciler Derneği İstanbul Şubesi)
      • Amaç: Bilgi okuryazarlığının önemi konusunda toplumda farkındalık yaratmak, 12-18 yaş grubundaki gençlerin bilgi okuryazarlık becerilerinin gelişmesini sağlamak)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 54. Ulusal toplantılar
    • Kütüphane Haftası Programları
      • 2009 Ankara
      • 2008 İstanbul
      • 2007 Ankara
      • 2006 İzmir
      • 2004 Konya
      • 2002 Ankara
      • 1998 Ankara
    • BTIE Bilişim Teknolojileri Işığında Eğitim – Ankara -2000
    • 21. Yüzyıla Girerken Enformasyon Olgusu – Hatay – 2001
    • Birinci Uluslararası e- Öğrenme Konferansı – İstanbul - 2004
    • İLİPG - Elektronik Ortamda Bilgi Okuryazarlığı – İstanbul - 2008
    • Bilgi Okuryazarlığı Ulusal Konferansı – İstanbul - Mart 2009
    • 2. Ulusal Okul Kütüphanecileri Konferansı – İstanbul - Haziran 2009
    • 3. Ulusal Okul Kütüphanecileri Konferansı – Ankara - Haziran 2010
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 55. Uluslararası toplantılar
    • UNESCO Eğiticilerin Eğitimi Çalıştayı
      • Eylül 2008 – Hacettepe Üniversitesi – Ankara
      • 17 ülkeden 48 katılımcı
      • Katılımcıların temsil ettiği kurumlar: Kütüphaneler (okul, üniversite, halk)  eğitim kurumları,  araştırma enstitüleri, kütüphane dernekleri, belediyeler, bakanlıklar
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 56. İlk ve orta öğretimde bilgi okuryazarlığı çalışmaları
    • Milli Eğitim Bakanlığı – “Bilgi Erişim ve Araştırma Teknikleri” dersi (2002)
      • Orta öğretim
      • Haftada 2 saat
      • Seçmeli
      • Bilgiye erişim, bilgi kaynakları, araştırma teknikleri vs.
    • Eğitim programları
      • Özel okullar (TED Ankara Koleji, Tevfik Fikret Okulları, Eyüboğlu Okulları)
      • Devlet okulları ( İLİPG projesi)
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 57. Yüksek öğretimde bilgi okuryazarlığı çalışmaları
    • Araştırma yöntemleri dersleri
    • Kütüphane eğitim programları
      • Geleneksel kullanıcı eğitimi
        • İçerik (kütüphane merkezli)
        • Sunum (seminerler, tanıtım turları)
        • Materyaller (web sayfaları, broşürler)
      • Bilgi okuryazarlığı eğitimi
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 58. Öğretmen eğitimi
    • Ortak program
      • Araştırma yöntemleri vb.
      • Bilgisayar okuryazarlığı
    • H.Ü. Eğitim Fakültesi Proje
      • İlköğretim Matematik Bölümü son sınıf öğrencileri
    • Hizmetiçi eğitim programları
      • Tevfik Fikret Okulları (Ankara ve İzmir)
      • TED Ankara Koleji
      • Bilkent Lisesi
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 59. Kütüphanecilerin eğitimi
    • UNESCO Ankara Çalıştayı
    • H. Ü. Bilgi ve Belge Yönetimi Bölümü
      • Lisans (2006-2007)
        • Bilgi Okuryazarlığı
        • Eğitim Bilimlerine Giriş
      • Yüksek Lisans (2006-2007)
        • Bilgi Okuryazarlığında Program Geliştirme
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 60. Yayınlar
    • Makaleler
      • Türk Kütüphaneciliği
      • Bilgi Dünyası
      • H.Ü. Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi
    • Bildiriler
      • Kütüphane Haftaları
      • Ulusal ve uluslar arası toplantılar
    • Tezler (kütüphanecilik, eğitim, hemşirelik)
      • Doktora
      • Yüksek Lisans
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 61. Öneriler
    • Ulusal planlar ve politikaların içinde yer almasını sağlamak
    • Tanıtım yapmak ve farkındalık yaratmak
    • Bilgilendirme toplantıları yapmak
    • Ulusal standartları hazırlamak
    • Konunun önemine ve ihmal edilmesinin yaratacağı sorunlara değinen raporlar hazırlamak
    • Çalışma grupları oluşturmak (dernekler)
    • Kurumsallaşmak (bir bilgi okuryazarlığı enstitüsü kurmak)
    • Araştırmaları desteklemek, yayınları teşvik etmek
    • İşbirliği olanakları yaratmak
    • Forum oluşturmak
    • Tartışma listesi kurmak
    • Bibliyografya hazırlamak
    • Blog oluşturmak
    • Toplantıları düzenli aralarla yapmak
    • Çalıştaylar, eğitim programları düzenlemek
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 62. Kaynaklar
    • ALA. (2000). Information literacy: a position paper on information problem solving. Wisconsin: Wisconsin Educational Media Association.
    • ALA Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. (1989). Final report. Chicago:ALA.
    • Bundy, A. (ed). (2004). Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy Framework principles, standards and practise (2nd ed). Adeliane: Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy.
    • Friedman, J. L. (2005). The world is flat: a brief history of the twenty-first century. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    • Godwin, P. (2006). Information literacy in the age of amateurs: How Google and Web 2.0 affect librarians’ support of information literacy.
    • Godwin, P. (2007). The Web 2.0 challenge to Information Literacy. INFORUM 2007: 13th Conference on Professional Information Resources, Prague, May 22-24, 2007.
    • Godwin, P. & Parker, J. (2008). Information literacy meets Library 2.0 . London: Facet.
    • Lyman , P. & Varian , H. R. ( 2003 ). How much information? Ann Arbor,MI: University of Michigan.
    • Maness, J. M. (2006). Library 2.0 theory: Web 2.0 and its implications for libraries. Webology, 3(2). http://www.webology.ir/2006/v3n2/a25.html
    • Oblinger, D. G. & Hawkins, B. L. (2006). The myth about student competency ”our students are technologically competent”. Educause Review, 41(2). http://www.educause.edu/apps/er/erm06/erm0627.asp
    • Salo, D. (2006). Design speaks. Library Journal, 15 Oct. 2006.
    • Secker, J. (2008). Social software, libraries and distance learners: literature review . London: University of London
    • Valenza, J. (2006). Web 2.0 meets information fluency. Joyce Valenza’s NeverEnding Seacr, blog. http://joycevalenza.edublogs.org/tag/information-fluency/
    • Rockman, I. F. (2004). Integrating information literacy into the higher education curriculum: practical models for transformation. San Francisco: John Wiley.
    • Snavely, L. ve Cooper, N. (1997). The information literacy debate. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 23(1), 9-13.
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara
  • 63. Teşekkürler
    • Prof. Dr. Serap Kurbanoğlu
    • [email_address]
    • Hacettepe Üniversitesi
    • Bilgi ve Belge Yönetimi Bölümü
    Mayıs 2011 - Empatic - Ankara