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The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
The Career Guide
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The Career Guide

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The Career Guide features five simple tactics you can follow to start developing your career like some of EMC's most successful leaders and employees.

The Career Guide features five simple tactics you can follow to start developing your career like some of EMC's most successful leaders and employees.

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  • 1.    
  • 2. The Career GuideIntroduction  One  of  the  more  popular  tools  on  the  Global  Services  Career  Center  is  Career  TV,  a  series  of  video  podcasts  with  successful  leaders  and  employees  in  the  GS  organization.  (Learn  more  at  http://bit.ly/GSCareers.)    Career  TV  started  in  early  2010,  and  since  then,  we’ve  talked  to  a  lot  of  people  about  their  careers.    We  wanted  to  understand  what  it  takes  to  be  successful  in  EMC  Global  Services,  so  we  started  looking  for  trends  in  our  interviews.    We  found  that  people  who  are  successful  here  all  share  a  common  approach:  Daily  Development.    Like  the  Japanese  philosophy  of  continuous  improvement,  Daily  Development  involves  taking  small,  focused  steps  to  grow  your  career  ever  day.  Rather  than  thinking  about  career  development  as  an  event  (like  a  training  seminar  or  promotion),  successful  people  at  EMC  approach  career  development  as  a  series  of  learning  moments  that  result  in  big  changes  over  time.    How do you practice Daily Development?  This  book  is  a  short  guide  to  implementing  Daily  Development.  It  features  tactical,  actionable  steps  you  can  take  to  start  developing  your  career  like  some  of  EMC’s  most  successful  leaders  and  employees.    This  book  contains  five  sections:   1. Focused  Feedback   2. Micro-­‐Development   3. On-­‐the-­‐Job  Development   4. Professional  Relationships   5. Career  Karma    Let’s  get  started!  http://bit.ly/GSCareers     2  
  • 3. The Career Guide1. Focused Feedback  “Improve  your  communication  skills.”    If  you  received  that  feedback,  where  would  you  start?  What  would  you  work  on  first?  How  would  your  improve  your  communication  skills?    What  if  you  were  instead  told,  “Write  shorter  emails,”  or  “Provide  more  context.”  Would  that  help?    Feedback  is  far  more  useful  when  it’s  focused  on  specific  actions  and  behaviors.    Focused  feedback  is  the  foundation  of  Daily  Development.  It  provides  you  with  a  framework  for  continuous  improvement.  The  next  time  someone  tells  you  that  you  need  to  improve  your  communication  skills  (or  anything  else),  ask  them  for  specific  examples.    A  key  aspect  of  the  Daily  Development  approach  is  that  it’s  continuous  improvement.  Seek  ongoing  feedback  –  don’t  just  wait  for  your  annual  performance  review.      Every  time  you  work  on  a  project,  lead  a  meeting,  deliver  a  presentation,  or  do  anything  that  involves  skills  you’re  looking  to  develop,  ask  for  focused  feedback.    Feedback  isn’t  just  about  things  you  need  to  improve.  It’s  about  the  stuff  that  you’re  good  at,  too.    Martin  Seligman  and  Marcus  Buckingham  conducted  research  with  the  Gallup  Organization  on  what  sets  successful  people  apart  from  everyone  else.  They  found  that  that  successful  people  capitalize  on  what  they’re  good  at.      Your  weaknesses  may  hold  you  back,  but  your  strengths  are  what  will  get  you  ahead.    http://bit.ly/GSCareers     3  
  • 4. The Career Guide2. Micro-Development  “I  don’t  have  time.”    This  is  the  number  one  challenge  we  hear  from  people  about  career  development.      How  much  time  do  you  have?  An  hour  a  week?  That’s  less  than  15  minutes  a  day.    And  when  you  seek  feedback  that’s  focused  on  specific  actions  and  behaviors,  that’s  all  you  need!  Remember,  the  Daily  Development  approach  is  about  a  series  of  learning  moments  that  result  in  big  changes  over  time.    So  what  can  you  do  in  15  minutes?  You  could  read  an  article  or  white  paper.  You  could  brainstorm  with  a  peer,  read  a  chapter  of  book,  or  listen  to  a  podcast.  And  as  you’ll  learn  in  the  section  on  building  professional  relationships,  it’s  the  perfect  amount  of  time  to  grow  your  network,  too!    Here  are  two  great  resources  to  help  you  get  you  started:     • The  EMC  Blogging  Community  writes  about  a  variety  of  topics  important  to  EMC’s  business.  You’ll  find   articles  on  everything  from  marketing  to  cloud  computing  to  corporate  education.  Start  reading  at   www.emc.com/community.       • Powerlink  has  many  wonderful  career  resources,  including  book  summaries,  white  papers  and   podcasts.  Explore  all  they  have  to  offer  at  powerlink.emc.com.      http://bit.ly/GSCareers     4  
  • 5. The Career Guide3. On-the-Job Development  “A  ship  is  safe  in  port,  but  that’s  not  what  ships  were  made  for.”     -­‐  Dr.  Grace  Murray  Hopper,  US  Navy  Officer    One  of  the  recurring  themes  in  our  interviews  for  Career  TV  is  the  importance  of  getting  out  your  comfort  zone.  Real  career  growth  happens  when  you  apply  the  things  that  you’ve  learned  on  the  job.    You  can  grow  and  develop  in  your  current  role  by  taking  on  projects  and  assignments  that  stretch  your  skills  and  experience.  These  types  of  projects  are  called  stretch  assignments.    How  do  you  find  stretch  assignments?  Have  a  conversation  with  your  manager.      Your  manager’s  role  in  your  career  development  is  to  provide  you  with  opportunities  to  learn  and  grow.  Let  your  manager  know  that  you’re  looking  to  develop  a  specific  skill.    If  you’re  looking  to  improve  your  presentation  skills,  maybe  you  could  lead  a  team  meeting  or  deliver  training  on  a  business  topic.  If  you’re  looking  to  grow  your  leadership  skills,  you  might  ask  to  lead  a  team  project.    And  when  you’re  ready  to  move  into  a  new  role,  don’t  be  afraid  to  try  new  things,  move  into  new  job  families  and  other  organizations.  Some  of  the  biggest  career  growth  spurts  happen  when  you  try  things  radically  new.  http://bit.ly/GSCareers     5  
  • 6. The Career Guide4. Professional Relationships  Your  professional  network  is  one  of  your  most  powerful  career  tools.    The  people  in  your  network  can  provide  you  with  focused  feedback,  and  show  you  helpful  tools  and  resources.  They  can  help  you  find  on-­‐the-­‐job  learning  opportunities,  and  provide  you  with  guidance  as  push  yourself  out  of  your  comfort  zone.  And  when  the  time  comes  to  move  into  a  new  role,  they  can  help  you  with  that,  too.    “Can  I  learn  more  about  what  you  do  over  coffee?”    That  phrase  is  a  great  way  to  build  and  maintain  professional  relationships.  Reach  out  to  new  people  and  ask  them  if  they  have  15  minutes  to  talk  about  their  career.  Shoot  a  quick  note  to  peers  and  colleagues  you  haven’t  talked  to  in  a  while  and  ask  to  catch  up.    Ask  them  about  their  role  and  what  projects  they’re  work  on.  You  might  even  find  out  about  a  new  stretch  assignment  opportunity!    Your  network  is  no  longer  limited  to  the  people  that  you  sit  near  and  work  with.      Thanks  to  email  lists,  wikis,  blogs  and  discussion  forums  (like  one.emc.com),  you  can  connect  with  people  all  over  the  globe.  Instead  of  a  conversation  over  coffee,  pick  up  the  phone,  connect  by  webcam,  or  schedule  time  to  meet  the  next  time  you’re  in  town.    Your  professional  network  will  also  grow  organically  over  time  as  you  participate  in  more  stretch  assignment  and  on-­‐the-­‐job  development  projects.  Just  remember  to  keep  in  touch.    http://bit.ly/GSCareers     6  
  • 7. The Career Guide5. Career Karma  Total  Customer  Experience  is  an  integral  part  of  Global  Services.      We  hear  people  talk  about  it  in  various  ways:   • Put  the  customer  first.   • Support  the  business.   • Help  drive  your  manager’s  goals.    They’re  all  saying  the  same  thing:  Help  others  succeed  and  you  will  too.    That’s  Career  Karma.  If  you’re  an  employee,  help  improve  the  careers  (and  lives)  of  your  peers,  your  customers,  and  your  manager.  If  you’re  a  leader,  give  your  team  the  tools  and  resources  they  need  to  succeed.    Help  others  succeed  and  you  will  too.  http://bit.ly/GSCareers     7  
  • 8. The Career GuideLearn More  You  can  find  more  tools  and  resources  related  to  this  topic  and  many  more  on  the  Global  Service  Career  Center  at  http://bit.ly/GSCareers.    Cover  image  by  Stock  Exchange.  http://bit.ly/GSCareers     8  

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